The Anonymous Widower

Platform Layout On Crossrail

My post on Custom House station got me asking the question – In how many Crossrail stations, will there be a central island platform with two platform faces or a shared area possibly with platform edge doors serving both lines, rather than two separate platforms with the tracks together in the middle?

Crossrail is effectively a two-track railway and only a few stations have more than two platforms that will be used by Crossrail trains.

This is an index of all Crossrail stations, with links to their page on the Crossrail web site and Wikipedia.

Note that at present not all stations, have their own page on the Crossrail web site.

Abbey Wood Station – An existing station with two new Crossrail platforms. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Acton Main Line – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Bond Street – A new two-platform station with possibly a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Brentwood – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Burnham – An existing two-platform station with an island platform. Wikipedia

Canary Wharf – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Chadwell Heath – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Custom House – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Ealing Broadway Station – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer, that will be rebuilt. Wikipedia

Farringdon – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Gidea Park – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Hanwell – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and subway transfer. Wikipedia

Harold Wood – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Hayes and Harlington – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer, that will be rebuilt. Wikipedia

Iver – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Langley – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer. Wikipedia

Liverpool Street – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Maidenhead – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and subway transfer.

Manor Park – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

Maryland – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

Old Oak Common – A new station to be designed and built after Crossrail is completed.

Paddington – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Reading – A large existing station, which has been future-proofed to act as a terminal for Crossrail.

Seven Kings – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

Slough – A large existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

Shenfield – An existing station with three separate Crossrail platforms and subway transfer.

Southall – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer, that will be rebuilt.

Stratford – A large existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and subway transfer.

Taplow – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

Tottenham Court Road – A new two-platform station with possibly a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Twyford – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer.

West Drayton – An existing station with two/three separate Crossrail platforms and bridge/subway transfer.

West Ealing – An existing station with two separate Crossrail platforms and bridge transfer, that will be rebuilt.

Whitechapel – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

Woolwich – A new two-platform station with a shared area between them. – Crossrail Wikipedia

July 7, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , | Leave a comment

Custom House Station – 5th July 2015

Custom House station has been progressing and now even has some glass in the windows.

You can also see that the Crossrail trains will go either side of the central building. It now appears that this is the preferred way to design a new station.

At Custom House station it will mean that passengers arriving at the station from Excel or on the DLR, would appear to go to the same platform, which will have two faces; one for Central London and one for Kent.

When you consider that London Underground deep-level stations since the 1930s have been designed this way with a central platform, it puzzles me, why we have such uninspiring recent station designs like the Thameslink platforms at St. Pancras.

Where you have a two-track railway, the layout must be more affordable, as you only need one set of lifts/escalators/stairs and other services.

On the other hand, you need a bridge over the tracks or a subway beneath them, where the railway is on the surface. Obviously in some places the geography of the area, will make this easier. For example if a station is in a cutting or there is a road bridge.

At Custom House a large proportion of passengers will arrive at First Floor level either from Excel or after taking a short escalator up from the DLR, so there will only need to be access from the street up to the First Floor circulation area, from where I took these pictures. At present the DLR uses steps and a lift. I’m sure the completed station will use an elegant solution with probably escalators instead of stairs.

July 6, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , , | 2 Comments

A Circular Walk From Royal Oak Station

When I wrote about my last visit to Royal Oak and the Westbourne Park Footbridge in October last year, I said this.

It will be fascinating to go back here, to see the area, as the railway and its infrastructure progresses.

So this morning, I went back and took these pictures, to see if they could add to what I saw yesterday.

Things have moved on apace.

1. Royal Oak station is no longer the rusting ruin it was last year and all of the glass is now clear and immaculate.

2. Crossrail has also dropped the height of the blue security fence, which means tall people can get good pictures of the Crossrail site from the platform of Royal Oak station.

3. It is now clear that the arches support the slip road up to the Westway and that they may have once supported an old railway line.

4. I was pleased to see the lith-style information displayed in a poster. It must help with putting information in places, which are too small or not suitable for a full size lith. It all goes to show how good, Legible London is.

According to Wikipedia, it is now the world’s largest pedestrian wayfinding project. So if Ipswich can have one, why can’t any number of important capital and tourist cities.

5. Crossrail’s Royal Oak Portal is now clearly visible from the Westbourne Park Footbridge and the pictures show what a tight squeeze the double-track railway is between the Westway and the Metropolitan Line.

6. I don’t think it will be long before they start laying track, as this will make it easier to get men and materials in and out of the tunnels.

7. I have read that between the portal and the existing bus garage, the area will be used to store trains and also turn back those running to Paddington. The bus garage extension is being built over the sidings.

Crossrail is certainly coming together in Westbourne Park, where it squeezes between the Westway and the Great Western Main Line.

 

 

July 5, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , | Leave a comment

Crossrail’s Royal Oak Portal

Unlike the Crossrail tunnel portals at Abbey Wood and Stratford, the portal at Royal Oak is rather hidden away under the Westway, with no suitable vantage point to see the site. This Google Map shows the tunnel portal from Royal Oak station to the footbridge at Westbourne Park, where I took these pictures.

Royal Oak Tunnel Portal

Royal Oak Tunnel Portal

It shows the cramped nature of the site, which is just 21m. wide. This is an enlarged image of the ramp leading down to the start of the tunnel under London.

An Enlarged View

An Enlarged View

The only pictures I can find on the web with a proper explanation are in this article on the London Reconnections web site. In that article a picture is labelled as the remains of the arches and they are shown under the Westway and facing South. They are probably the arches in these pictures I took from the train.

I am not sure, but it looks like the arches support the access ramp that lead up to the Westway. But they are not shown in this architectural drawing from Acanthus, which shows the area around the Ventilation shaft they have designed for Crossrail.

Crossrail Ventilation Shaft By Acanthus

Crossrail Ventilation Shaft By Acanthus

This Google Map shows the current access with relation to the two bridges and Royal Oak station.

Access To The Westway

Access To The Westway

Note the long pipes, which I assume are either covering conveyors that remove the spoil for the tunnels or are to there to pump fresh air into the tunnels.

The station has recently been renovated, but once Crossrail is complete to the North of the station, are we going to see a comprehensive redevelopment of the area.

All will be revealed in time.

 

 

July 5, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Extending Westbourne Park Bus Garage

I have noticed this structure grow over the last few months and have wandered what it is.

It now looks like it might be the extension to the bus parking area talked about in this article on Tower Transit in Wikipedia. This is said.

A new 180m bus parking area is to be built on a raised platform over railway lines as part of the Crossrail project.

This Google Map shows the garage squeezed under the Westway.

Westbourne Park Bus Garage

Westbourne Park Bus Garage

I think the Google Map was taken some time ago, as all that appears visible is probably the foundations furthest away from the bus garage.

It’s probably a sensible use for the site, where no-one would probably want to live sandwiched between the Westway and the Great Western Main Line.

It’s also a very good way of using the air space over the railway to effectively create new land.

 

July 4, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , | 1 Comment

Southall Station – 4th July 2015

These pictures were taken at Southall station.

Ealing Council has also given planning permission for the new station and also for West Ealing station as is reported in this article on rail.co.uk.

 

July 4, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , | 2 Comments

Acton Dive Under – 4th July 2015

I took these pictures as I passed the Acton Dive Under.

On this page on the Crossrail site, this is said.

The start of excavation follows nearly two years of work to re-configure the freight yard. The work on the dive-under is being managed by Network Rail and is expected to last until 2016.

Progress would appear to be in line with that statement.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see this work finished earlier than expected, as surely when the Acton Dive  Under is complete, this must make the operation of the railway easier, as freight trains crossing from the sidings at Acton will cause less disruption.

July 4, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

West Ealing Station – 4th July 2015

Work has started on the creation of the bay platform for the Greenford Branch at West Ealing station.

Some of these pictures were taken from a train that stopped at the station. The window intrudes on the right.

Ealing Council has also given planning permission for the new station and also for Southall station as is reported in this article on rail.co.uk.

It certainly appears that the builders have got of the marks quickly!

Could this be because it would make planning Crossrail and the station works easier, with the Greenford Branch just working a four times-per-hour shuttle to a bay platform well out of the way?

July 4, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , | 2 Comments

We Need A Bertrand Russell Solution To The Problem Of Expansion Of Airports In The South East?

I don’t know where I got the quote from, but I once heard that Betrand Russell had said.

Necessity may be the mother of invention, but pressure is the father of genius.

What we need to do, is accept that Heathrow will eventually get that third runway, but that we’re going to delay it as long as possible.

In the meantime we apply restrictions on Heathrow, so that it becomes a much better neighbour. The report recommends these restrictions, if a third runway is built.

  • No night flights between 11:30 pm. and 06:00 am.
  • No fourth runway ever.
  • A restrictive noise envelope around the airport with a noise levy to insulate homes and schools.
  • An independent noise authority to regulate flight paths.
  • Possibly adding a congestion charge for cars around the airport to o cut pollution levels.
  • Any additional capacity doesn’t breach European Union air quality limits.

I would go further.

  • It wouldn’t be a possibility of a congestion charge, but one would be applied all along the western side of the M25 and on any road near the airport, so that roads could be improved to take non-airport traffic away from the airport.
  • Even more restricted short term parking at the Airport.
  • I would make night flights more restrictive, but I would relax it somewhat for aircraft that met very much quieter noise standards.

I would also legislate to impose these conditions by December 2019. I have chosen this date, as that is when the full Crossrail network is scheduled to open to Heathrow.

But no sticks work without carrots to get idiots to do what you want, so how about.

  • Crossrail is currently planning to run 4 trains per hour to Heathrow, but not to Terminal 5. Crossrail should be upgraded to call at all terminals and provision should be made to increase the frequency if necessary.
  • Development of Old Oak Common station, with direct services using Crossrail from Heathrow to the Midlands and the North.
  • Accelerated development of alternative rail routes into Heathrow from the South and West.
  • Extend Crossrail from Abbey Wood to Ebbsfleet International, so that passengers have one-change access to Eurostar.
  • A free return ticket to anywhere on Crossrail for all passengers.

If we got the balance right, I suspect that it would accelerate innovation on the part of airlines to provide new and more efficient services for passengers.

We also mustn’t underestimate the effect that Crossrail will have on improving the efficiency of Heathrow and possibly in the reduction of vehicular traffic and air pollution in the region of the airport.

Crossrail though will have a very big negative effect on Gatwick, as why if you had the choice would you use the airport, given that Heathrow will have the better links to Central London.

 

July 1, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

At Last, A Station For Crossrail With Style

With the exception of Canary Wharf and Custom House stations, a lot of the designs have been poorly-received by architectural critics.

So I was surprised and pleased to see this piece on the Crossrail web site describing the new West Ealing station. This picture of the new station building is shown.

West Ealing Station

West Ealing Station

It has style and I also believe that it is designed to fit the purpose for which station buildings are now needed. All a station building needs to be today is a shelter for the barriers, ticket machines, staff and perhaps a retail kiosk or two. Get the people flow through them correct and they can be even smaller and more affordable.

It is interesting to look at the layout of the lines. This Google Map shows the situation at present.

West Ealing Current Layout

West Ealing Current Layout

Note the Greenford Branch curving away to the North. This branch is probably an operational headache for rail managers, as the trains currently have to join the line to get to their terminus at Paddington station. After West Ealing station has been rebuilt, there will be a bay platform for trains on the branch. It is shown in this drawing I found on the Internet.

West Ealing New Layout

West Ealing New Layout

You have to wonder if the Greenford Branch will be developed and Wikipedia has a section on the branch’s future. Should it be electrified and should as Ealing Council have suggested the line be extended to Clapham Junction via the West London Line?

Undoubtedly, it should be electrified and the published plan of four trains per hour would certainly improve matters. But as with many things, we’re waiting for Crossrail and the plans for Old Oak Common to be vcompleted.

It does seem to me that the design for West Ealing station has set a new standard for Crossrail stations.

But as the first comment received has shown, there is a problem with access to the station from the South. This Google Map shows an enlarged view of the current station.

An Enlarged View Of West Ealing Station

An Enlarged View Of West Ealing Station

Note how the supermarket and the car parks, backed by the two fast lines of the Great Western Main Line create a barrier that is impenetrable to any access to the station. Even if access were possible, it would be a long walk between Alexandria Road and the new station.

It strikes me that the only way better southern access to the station could have been enabled, would have been if the new station had been designed in conjunction with the supermarket, when that was developed.

It should be noted that at present West Ealing station has no car parking and do many of the locals feel that this should be provided in the new station?

To sum up, West Ealing station has problems in resolving some design issues, as it was not properly designed, when the supermarket and the land south of the railway was developed.

In my view, it illustrates one of the problems of the surface sections of Crossrail, They have been left to rot for years, when they should have been upgraded well before construction of the line started.

June 20, 2015 Posted by | Travel | , , | 2 Comments

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