The Anonymous Widower

More Frequent Trains And A New Station For The London Overground

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

This is a summary of what Ian says.

  • The new Surrey Canal Road station will be built and called New Bermondsey.
  • A second entrance will be built at Surrey Quays station.
  • Updated signalling will allow the frequency of trains  through the core section of the East London Line to rise from sixteen trains per hour (tph) to twenty.
  • The service between Highbury & Islington and Crystal Palace stations will be increased from four to six tph.
  • The service between Dalston Junction and Clapham Junction stations will be increased from four to six tph.

Ian says this about the link between funding and project delivery.

.The funding under the HIF needs to be spent by 2023, so that’s the deadline for the upgrades to be delivered.

It is a substantial upgrade, which is supported by a Government grant of £80.3million to help in the construction of 14,000 homes.

These are my thoughts.

New Bermondsey Station

I covered building this station in Would This Be The Easiest Station To Build In The UK?.

These pictures were taken in 2015.

The station is close to Millwall FC’s stadium  and this Google Map shows the relationship between the stadium and the station.

The stadium is at the top of the map and the station is in the South-East corner of the map and will be built over Surrey Canal Road.

The Second Entrance At Surrey Quays Station

Ian says this about the second entrance at Surrey Quays station.

The very cramped Surrey Quays station gets a second entrance, which will run under the main road and be based on the north side, where the shopping centre car park is today. That avoids crossing two busy roads, which can take some time if you’re waiting for the lights to change.

This Google Map shows the area around the station.

Ian’s description fits well!

Extra Trains

Both the Clapham Junction and Crystal Palace routes take around 40-45 minutes with a generous turnround time, giving a round trip time of two hours.

  • This would mean that currently both these routes both need eight trains.
  • Increase the frequency to six tph and both routes need twelve trains.
  • This means that another eight trains will be needed to boost the frequency from four tph to six on both routes.

The extra trains should preferably be Class 378 trains, as these are certified for working through the Thames Tunnel, whereas the new Class 710 trains are not.

  • Six Class 710 trains are destined for the Watford DC Line, where they will replace the current Class 378 trains, which will go to the East London Line.
  • There are also six five-car Class 710 trains on order to boost services on the North and West London Lines, which could allow a few five-car Class 378 trains to more to the East london Line.

If Bombardier can deliver the Class 710 trains, then I don’t see have any problems in finding enough trains for the East London Line.

In fact, if London Overground decided to run more services through the Thames Tunnel, they probably have enough trains to run 24 tph on the East London Line, if they should wish.

Would It Be Better To Turn Both 6 tph Services At Highbury & Islington Station?

The East London Line has its own dedicated tracks between Dalston Junction and Highbury & Islington stations, with an intermediate stop at Canonbury station.

  • Currently, there are eight tph between Dalston Junction and Highbury & Islington
  • If the Crystal Palace service is increased by two tph, the frequency will increase to ten tph  between Dalston Junction and Highbury & Islington.
  • If the Clapham Junction service is increased by two tph and turns back at Highbury & Islington station, the frequency will increase to twelve tph between Dalston Junction and Highbury & Islington.

To travellers like me, who live halfway between Canonbury and Dalston Junction station, the increased frequency could be very welcome.

  • If I’m coming from the West on the North London Line, I will often change trains at Canonbury, take one stop to Dalston Junction and then take a bus to my house.
  • From the East, I’ll use the cross-platform interchange at Canonbury, and go home via Dalston Junction and a bus.
  • Tranport for London have recently halved the bus service between my house and Highbury & Islington station, so I tend to use the  Canonbury change more often.

The increase in frequency between Canonbury and Dalston Junction stations, will mean that those changing to go South will have less time to wait.

It would surely help at Dalston Junction station, in that if both six tph services, went through to Highbury & Islington, as passengers would sort themselves out better in busy times, as to which platform to use.

  • Platform 1 – 12 tph to Canonbury and Highbury & Islington
  • Plstform 2 – 4 tph to and from Surray Quays and New Cross
  • Platform 3 – 4 tph to and from Surray Quays and West Croydon
  • Platform 4 – 12 trains to Surray Quays and Crystal Palace or Clapham Junction

\s Platforms 3 and 4 share a spacious island platform, effectively it will be a  16 tph Southbound platform.

South of Dalston Junction station, there will be the same increase to 20 tph, no matter where the individual services turn back.

I suspect too, that there if twelve tph by-passed Dalston Junction station, as they do in the through platforms, that operationally, it might be easier.

 

August 18, 2019 - Posted by | Transport | , , , , ,

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