The Anonymous Widower

Ryanair Expects Boeing 737 Max Jet Clearance Soon

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Ryanair has said it expects the controversial Boeing 737 Max plane to be allowed to fly again in the US in the next month or so.

You won’t catch me booking a flight, with any airline, that flies any of these planes for at least thirty years.

I actually feel, that technology will overtake these planes long before that.

  • They are still made traditionally from aluminium, unlike the competing Airbus A320, which is made from composite, which offers weight and aerodynamic advantages.
  • There is no way, the 737 MAX could be converted to zero-carbon flying.
  • Zero-carbon aircraft will be flying by 2030.

I also think, that it when passengers have a choice, they will avoid the aircraft.

October 10, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Get Set For Max Return, Says Boeing

The title of this post is the same as this article in The Times.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Boeing is to fire up its 737 Max production line by May as it seeks to return the aircraft to service by the middle of the year.

Two points from the article.

  • Some suppliers have been asked to start shipping parts from April.
  • Boeing’s share price has risen, by 34.3%

But given the shadow over air travel caused by COVID-19, is restarting production a wise move?

I certainly don’t trust the Boeing 737 MAX!

But then if you live in London, I don’t think, you will need to fly in one, as there are a good selection of short haul trains and airlines that fly the smaller Airbuses.

I probably won’t fly short-haul again, until an airline starts flying electric aircraft.

March 26, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 3 Comments

Test Pilot Case Turns Up Problems To Max

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on The Times.

This is the two introductory paragraphs.

The double-whammy of the 737 Max crisis and the coronavirus pandemic has shredded Boeing’s share price, but the aviation giant could soon find itself fighting on yet another front.

Federal investigators are trying to build a criminal case against Mark Forkner, the former Max test pilot, if they believe they can prove allegations that he misled American air safety officials about the jet’s safety, it was reported yesterday.

It looks to me, that Boeing is getting deeper in the mire.

I’m keeping well away from the company and their products.

March 14, 2020 Posted by | Business, Transport | , | Leave a comment

Boeing: US Regulator Admits ‘Mistake’ Over Aircraft Crashes

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the first three paragraphs.

US aviation regulators allowed Boeing’s 737 Max aircraft to continue flying despite knowing there was a risk of further crashes.

Analysis after the first crash last year predicted there could be up to 15 disasters over the lifetime of the aircraft without design changes.

Despite this, the Federal Aviation Administration did not ground the Max until a second crash five months later.

The FAA chief said it was a mistake.

I would class it as a very big mistake.

When are Boeing going to come to the conclusion, that they can’t stretch the fifty-year-old design of the Boeing 737 and they need a new modern design?

 

 

December 12, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | 3 Comments

Max Delays Force Job Cuts At Ryanair

The title of this post is the same as that5 of this article on The Times.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Ryanair is to close bases and cut jobs because of the continuing delay in delivering the grounded Boeing 737 Max.

It obviously was going to happen, as if you haven’t got the planes, you’ll have to cut routes and that needs less staff and fewer bases.

November 5, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | 2 Comments

Boeing Staff Texted About 737 Max Issue In 2016

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

What is in the texts is another reason not to trust the design of these airliners.

October 19, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | 4 Comments

Boeing Left Safety Features Off MAX Jet

The title of this post is the same as that of this article in today’s copy of The Times.

It appears Boeing had a similar problem to that on the Boeing 737 MAX, on the KC-36A Pegasus, so they fitted an MCAS system.

This paragraph in the Wikipedia entry gives full details.

On 22 March 2019, the USAF announced it was reviewing KC-46 training after the Boeing 737 MAX groundings, as the KC-46 uses a similar Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) to that implicated in two 737 MAX crashes. However, the KC-46 is based on the Boeing 767-2C and its system takes input from dual redundant angle of attack sensors; it will disengage with stick input by the pilot. The Air Force stated that “The KC-46 has protections that ensure pilot manual inputs have override priority” and that it “does not fly the models of aircraft involved in the recent accidents” and that it is “reviewing our procedures and training as part of our normal and ongoing review process.

Note that there are dual redundant angle of attack sensors and the pilot takes control from the MCAS system, in the traditional manner.

These two features are not fitted on a 737 MAX.

Was the cost too great to maintain sales?

October 1, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Boeing ‘Misjudged 737 Max Pilot Reactions’

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Boeing needs to pay more heed to how pilots react to emergencies in its safety assessment of the 737 Max plane, US transport chiefs have said.

That is very true. But worldwide there are thousands of pilots who are certified to fly a 737.

If Boeing had designed the plane correctly, it would be a strength, and a very strong reason, why airlines would buy the plane.

Pilots  don’t want to kill anybody! Especially themselves!!” And they tend to be very risk averse!

So how many of those thousands of pilots would trust a 737 MAX?

If one has a serious incident, I’m sure social media will be buzzing.

 

September 26, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | 2 Comments

Flights For Sale On Deathtrap’ 737s

The title of this post, is the same as that on an article on the front page of today’s Sunday Times.

Apparently, TUI, United Airlines and some other airlines have booked passengers on Boeing 737 MAX 8 airlines for later in the year.

I certainly won’t fly these airlines until the Boeing 737 MAX scandal is over.

August 18, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | 7 Comments

Another Problem For The Boeing 737 MAX 8?

This article on the BBC is entitled Russia Bird Strike: Plane Crash-Lands After Hitting Gulls.

The aircraft involved in the accident was an Airbus A321-211, which was flying Ural Airlines Flight 178.

This model of Airbus 311 has CFM56 engines.

So what has that got to do with the Boeing 737 MAX 8?

|Especially as the Boeing aircraft is powered by the successor to the CFM56, the LEAP engine.

This engine is also offered on the latest baby Airbus; the A320neo.

As the Ural Airlines crash was the second bird strike that brought down a baby Airbus after US Airways Flight 1549, I wouldn’t be surprised to see see  certification authorities, making sure that this type of aircraft can land safely a double engine failure., providing the plane has enough height.

Airbus seems to have proven, that good airmanship can handle an Airbus A320, when it is flying as a glider.

Given the questioned  nature of the design of the computerised controls in a Boeing 737 MAX, the authorities might take a lot of convincing, that these aircraft can be handled safely in similar circumstances.

I think it should also be born in mind, that although the pilot of US Airways Flight 1549i; Chesley Sullenberger was very experienced, the two Russian pilots were much less so, but were still able to carry out a successful emergency landing without any fire and only comparatively minor injuries to those on board.

If you think I’m being alarmist about bird strikes, read the Wikipedia entry for bird strike.

This is a paragraph.

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) reported 65,139 bird strikes for 2011–14, and the Federal Aviation Authority counted 177,269 wildlife strike reports on civil aircraft between 1990 and 2015, growing 38% in 7 years from 2009 to 2015. Birds accounted for 97%.

We must not get complacent!

I hope that ICAO, the FAA and other authorities are collecting the data on bird strikes in a comprehensive manner and thoroughly analysing it, so that airports with serious problems are identified, so that they can improve their countermeasures.

 

 

August 17, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment