The Anonymous Widower

Vivarail Reveals New D-Trains Will Be Available In 2018

This is the title of an article in Rail Magazine.

I don’t know about the Class 230 train.

It could be an interesting concept, but when I read my brochure of the Class 319 Flex train, I fear it has got very strong competition.

  • The 319 Flex, is a true 100 mph bi-mode train.
  • There are 86 Class 319 trains, that could be converted.
  • The Class 319 train has proven reliability.
  • There is a large volume of knowledge about refurbishing, upgrading and converting Class 319 trains.
  • Four 319 Flex trains will be available this year.

If more trains to convert are needed, there are other classes.

May 18, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Hybrid Trains In The Former East Germany

In my travels from Göttingen, most of the local trains were diesel multiple units as local lines like the South Harz Railway are not electrified. On the other hand, the main lines through Göttingen, are all electrified.

In September 2016, I wrote German Trains With Batteries, which indicated a project in Germany to create hybrid trans, based at technical universities in Chemnitz and Dresden.

As some of the journeys I took in diesel trains, were under electrification, it would certainly appear that the German’s approach is sensible.

There would also appear to be lots of lines without electrification and diesel passenger services all over the area.

If the universities can come up with an economic and practical solution, there are certainly a lot of places to use these hybrid trains.

I think it is interesting to compare the German approach with that of Porterbrook/Northern with their development of the Class 319 Flex train.

  • The Germans are starting with a diesel Desiro Classic, whereas the British are starting with an electric Class 319 train.
  • Batteries are an important part of the German solution, but may not be part of the British one.
  • The German trains are nowhere near as old as the thirty-years-old British ones.

But the objectives of the two projects are to improve passenger services without doing a lot of expensive electrification.

 

 

May 8, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Last ‘319s’ On Thameslink This Summer

The title of this post is the title of an article in the May 2017 Edition of Modern Railways.

This is the first paragraph of the article.

Govia Thameslink Railway plans to withdraw its last Class 319s by the end of June, allowing it to operate a full Class 700 service on Thameslink this summer.

According to Wikipedia on the 28th April 2017, Thameslink still have thirty-five examples (319/0 – 13 and 319/4 – 22) and there are twelve examples Off Lease (319/2 – 1,319/3- 6 and 319/4 – 5)

So it looks like there could be a maximum of forty-seven trains released, of the following types.

In Riding In A Clean Class 319/4 Train, I wrote about riding in a particularly nice Class 319/4 train. If any of the other twenty-six are in as good a condition, operators will want to take them over.

There’s certainly enough trains to keep the refurbishment line busy for four or five years.

There is also plenty of scope for speculation about the specification of the refurbished trains and where the trains will see service.

  • How many will end up as bi-mode Class 319 Flex trains?
  • How many will retain their third rail capability?
  • How many will retain their First Class seats?
  • How many will get wi-fi?
  • How many will end up in a reserve fleet to cover for train shortages? Think level crossing accidents!
  • Will any have a luxury interior, so they can be used as special event trains and shuttles? Think Edinburgh to St. Andrews for the Open or Manchester to Aintree for the Grand National!
  • Will any be bought for use in non-passenger roles? Think 100 mph parcel carriers bringing goods into and out of big city stations at three in the morning!
  • Will any be bought by Network Rail for engineering purposes? Think testing and checking overhead and third-rail electrification!

Uses will be demand-led and I suspect some will be very surprising.

Operators have never had a train that is both a 100 mph electric train and a 90 mph diesel train, which is available, affordable and proven.

I shall discuss a few of the ideas in detail.

Parcels Trains

Currently, Royal Mail uses the closely-related Class 325 trains to move parcels traffic around the country. These trains have the following specification.

  • They are four-car electric units.
  • They can run as four, eight and twelve car units.
  • They are 100 mph dual-voltage trains.
  • Each car can carry twelve tonnes.
  • They use the same running gear as the Class 319 trains.

If they have a problem it is that they can only run on electrified lines, so they seem to be confined to the West and East Coast Main Lines.

Royal Mail and their train operator DB Cargo UK, might be interested in some more trains. They might even have use for some Class 319 Flex trains for routes with no or partial electrification.

In A Station At Doncaster Sheffield Airport, I talked of Peel Group’s plans to develop the Airport.

I said this.

It should also be stated that Doncaster Sheffield Airport has air cargo ambitions.

Consider.

  • It has a massive runway, that was able to accept the Space Shuttle in an emergency.
  • The airport has lots of space for cargo terminals.
  • The largest cargo planes, that exist only in the minds of Airbus and Boeing engineers would be welcome.
  • The Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway, which is a major freight route between the South East and the North passes the airport.
  • Plans exist to create a network of high speed package carrying trains. I’d use Doncaster Shjeffield Airport as a hub.
  • Amazon already fly freight to and from the Airport. Deliveries could leave the United States in the evening and be in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Liverpool, London and Manchester  for a morning delivery.

It looks like the Peel Group have a plan to create a transport interchange for both passengers and freight for a cost of millions, not billions. But it were to be worth spending billions, I’m certain that they can obtain it.

Could Class 319 trains be the trains delivering the parcels to main-line stations all over the country for onward distribution?

There must also be specialist and possibly perishable cargoes like fish and flowers, perhaps between Cornwall and London. Some of the cargoes now go in the large space in the locomotives of the InterCity 125s , but these trains are being phased out.

Could a Class 319 Flex train substitue with honour?

The Luxury Go-Anywhere Shuttle Train

Look at the venues for the Open Championship and they seem to be tucked away. But supposing there was an all Class 319 Flex train fitted with all First Class seating and a bar, it would make a very good alternative to get spectators to the venue in style.

Other venues within the trains range would include.

  • Aintree, Ascvot, Chelternham, Doncaster, Epsom, Goodwood, Haydock Park, Newbury, Newmarket, Sandown Park and York racecourses.
  • Glastonbury for the Festival
  • Henley for the Regatta.
  • Important football and rugby matches.

Travel First Class in any InterCity 125 and you realise the standard that can be applied to a Mark 3 coach.

Reserve Trains

Greater Anglia are often short of a train or two, with the cause often being a level crossing accident.

Their way round the problem is to hire in two Class 68 locomotives and some elderly coaches.

But surely, a better way, would be to have an appropriate number of Class 319 Flex trains available for hire with a driver!

They could deputise for a 100 mph electric train and an up to 90 mph diesel train.

Network Rail Use

Network Rail have a highly-instrumented InterCity 125 called the New Measurement Train, which is used to test the condition of the tracks all over the UK.

But it can only test those tracks where an InterCity 125 train is allowed.

If Network Rail ever need to create a smaller version of the train and especially one to test both overhead and third-rail electrification systems, a Class 319 train would be a candidate.

Conclusion

Porterbrook’s Sales and Marketing Department are going to have fun!

 

 

 

 

 

April 28, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Why Can’t A Train Be More Like A Tram?

This is the title of a two-part article by Ian Walmsley in the May 2017 edition of Modern Railways.

Part 1 – How Hard Can It Be?

In the First Part, which is entitled How Hard Can It Be?, he contrasts tram operation with typical heavy rail operation.

He starts the First Part with this paragraph.

After a career in trains, I wish they could be more like trams, at least for the short-distance commuting market. Big windows, low-back seats, super-cool looking front ends, terrific acceleration and braking, all at half the price. Meanwhile commuter trains are bogged down with legislation, defensive driving and restrictive practice.

He also compares trams and heavy rail with the London Underground, which has the frequency and speed of a tram to get the needed capacity. This is another quote.

Heavy-rail’s answer to capacity is to take a few seats out or declassify a First Class compartment, going faster is too difficult.

These points are also made.

  • A turn-up-and-go frequency is made possible by a continuous stream of trams doing the same thing, uninterrupted by inter-city or freight intruders.
  • Frequent stops on a tram mean rapid acceleration is essential, so a high proportion of axles must be motored.
  • In many heavy rail services, the culture of caution has removed any urgency from the process.
  • Separation of light from heavy rail is essential for safety reasons.
  • Trams can take tight corners which helps system designers.
  • Trams save money by driving on sight.
  • Lots of safety regulations apply to heavy rail,but not trams.

He also uses a lot of pictures from the Bordeaux trams, which I wrote about in Bordeaux’s Trams. These trams run catenary-free in the City Centre.

High-Cacapity Cross-City Heavy Rail Lines

It is interesting to note that cross-city heavy rail lines are getting to the following ideals.

  • High frequency of upwards of sixteen trains per hour (tph).
  • High-capacity trains
  • Heavy-rail standards of train and safety.
  • Slightly lower levels of passenger comfort.
  • Step-free access.
  • Several stops in the City Centre.
  • Interchange with trams, metros and other heavy rail services.
  • Separation from freight services.
  • Separation from most inter-city services.

Have the best features of a tram line been added to heavy rail?

Worldwide, these lines include.

There are obviously others.

Crossrail with up to 30 tph, platform edge doors, fast stopping and accelerating Class 345 trains, and links to several main lines from London could become the world standard for this type of heavy rail link.

30 tph would be considered average for the London Underground and modern signalling improvements and faster stopping trains, will raise frequencies on these cross-city lines.

All of these lines have central tunnels, but this isn’t a prerequisite.

Manchester is achieving the same objective of a high-capacity cross-city rail link with the Ordsall Chord.

Part 2 – Tram-Train, Are You Sure You Really Wnt |To Do This?,

In the Second Part, which is entitled  Tram-Train, Are You Sure You Really Wnt |To Do This?,

Ian starts the Second Part with this paragraph.

Anyone with a professional interest in public transport must have been to Karlsruhe in Germany, or at least heard of it.

He then wittily describes an encounter with the diesel tram-train in Nordhausen, which I shall be visiting within a week or so.

He was not impressed!

I like the concept of a tram-train, where the same rail vehicle starts out in the suburbs or the next town as a train, goes through the City Centre as a tram and then goes to a destination on the other side of the city.

But you could also argue that Merseyrail’s Northern Line and London Underground’s Piccadilly and Central Lines achieve the same purpose, by running at all times as a rail line, with the centre section in a tunnel under the City.

The Sheffield Tram-Train Project

Ian then goes on to talk about the Sheffield Tram-Train Project. He says this about the route extension from Meadowhall to Rotherham.

This route extension runs just over three miles and after a series of delays, it will not open until 2018, 10 years, after the first proposal, six after the scheme approval. The cost is £58million. That’s 21 million Rotherham – Meadowhall single fares, for which the existing journey time is six minutes. Bargain.

He also says that because Nick Clegg was a Sheffield MP, the project should stay in Sheffield.

I will add some observations of my own on the Sheffield -Rotherham tram-train.

  • The Class 399 tram-train is a variant of the tram-trains used in Karlsruhe – Good
  • The route, doesn’t connect to Sheffield station – Bad
  • The frequency is only a miserly three tph – Bad
  • The route is too short – Bad

Hopefully, the bad points don’t result in a system that nobody wants.

The Expert View Of Rotherham’s Problems

There is an article in the Yorkshire Post, which is entitled Rotherham could get new rail station, which gives detail from a consutant’s report of how to improve services in the town.

  • Rotherham Parkgate station should be developed as an inter-regional station, at a cost of up to £53.2 million
  • Rotherham Central station would be be more about local services.
  • Rotherham should have one tph to Leeds and Manchester, three tph  to Doncaster and six tph to Sheffield.

The consultant’s estimate was that this investment could benefit the area by up to £100million.

Ian’s Conclusion

Ian says this and I am coming to agree with him.

I, like many others, have been a fan of tram-train, but a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.

The more I think about it, the more I think trams and trains have their place and mixing them up is fraught with problems.

As I said earlier, I’m off to Karlsruhe ad I’ll see how they’re getting on with the enormous hole in their budget; the new tunnel on the Karleruhe Stadtbahn.

Imagine building a cut-and-cover down Oxford Street in London.

Train Like A Tram

Ian finishes with two further sections, the first of which is Train Like A Tram.

He says this.

Heavy rail needs to recaspture a sense of urgency and realise that more speed = more trains = more capacity. Risk analysis should allow the use of low-back seats and plastics; based on the lower average speeds. All axles need to be motored for tram-like acceleration and lots of regenerative braking.

I agree with what he says, but I’m surprised that he doesn’t mention Zwickau.

In that German town, an extension was built from the Hauptbahnhof to a new station in the town centre. I wrote about Zwickau’s unique system in Riding The Vogtlandbahn 

Standard two-car diesel multiple units, run alongside Zwickau’s trams on a dedicated route according to similar operational rules on the three kilometre route.

Surely, there is scope to do this in the UK, on existing and new branch lines or spurs.

  • The route must be short.
  • All stops would be built like tram stops.
  • Trains would be independently-powered by diesel, battery or fuel cell.
  • Signalling would be heavy-rail.

In my view this sort of system would be ideal for serving Glasgow, Leeds-Bradford and Liverpool Airports, where off main line running would be done across open country that could be appropriately fenced.

Tram Like A Train

Ian finishes his final section, where he talks about the likelihood of more tram-train systems following Sheffield, with this.

I suspect that the number of follow-on vehicles in the foreseeable future will be about the same as the number of battery EMUs based on the last research trial. 

Don’t feel too bad though; do we really want the national rail system full of 50 mph-limited trams?

I feel that Ian and myself would have different views about battery EMUs.

What Do You Do With A Problem Like Rotherham?

I mentioned a consultant’s report earlier and the easiest way to get their recommended frequency of trains through Rotherham would be to expand the electrification network, by wiring the following lines.

  • Sheffield to Doncaster
  • Leeds to Colton Junction
  • Leeds to Selby
  • Fitzwilliam to Sheffield

As some of these lines were built or rebuilt recently for the Selby Coalfield, I suspect electrification would be starting from decent documentatyion.

Until the electrification is complete Class 319 Flex trains could work the routes.

 

 

 

April 28, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

From Leeds To Rotherham

This was not what you would call a quality journey.

By train it took 56 minutes, which is about nine minutes longer than it would take in the average car according to various web sites.

There are also nine stops in another Cook’s Tour of Yorkshire.

It was also in a Class 142 train or Pacer.

The map clipped from Wikipedia shows the Wakefield Line, which is the route the train took.

These pictures were taken on the journey.

In this day and age for a journey of an hour a better train is needed, especially as the two end points are Leeds and Sheffield,where the two cities have a joint population of about 1.3 million.

The fastest trains between Leeds and Sheffield are run by CrossCountry and take forty minutes using the Wakefield Line.

As the fastest Rotherham Central to Sheffield trains take 14 minutes, I think it is reasonable to assume, that the right train could do Leeds to Rotherham Central in 26 minutes.

This route could become a Northern Connect route, run by new Class 195 trains.

As the route is electrified between Leeds and Fitzwilliam station, I wonder if this could be a route for a Class 319 Flex train.

Both trains are 100 mph units, as against the 75 mph of the Class 142 train, which probably defines the timetable.

From my observations, the route is not particularly arduous and I suspect that either train could do the journey in just over forty minutes, even with all the stops.

Certainly, the current service is truly dreadful and inadequate.

It appears that the overhead wires are going up for the tram-train to Sheffield. Or at least the gantries!

April 22, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Class 319 Flex Train And A Railbaar

When I wrote Could There Be A Battery-Powered Class 319 Flex Train?, not much information had been published on the Railbaar, but a Railbaar could be another tool to use with a Class 319 Flex train.

This is a paragraph from the advance copy I have of Porterbrook’s brochure for the Class 319 Flex train.

By way of an example, Porterbrook determined that the most arduous route would be Manchester Piccadilly to Buxton, which has a steep gradient and multiple stops along its 25 mile route (8 miles of which is electrified). This analysis was included to give confidence that the Class 319 Flex would be comparable to existing Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) technology across a range of different routes, stopping patterns and gradients.

Elsewhere in the brochure, they say this.

A large battery option was shown to be heavy, would require a lot of space and have long recharge times.

On the other hand, they have stated that batteries could be used to augment diesel power.

Challenging Rail Lines Up Steep Gradients in the UK

Lines like the Buxton Line are not unusual in the UK. The following challenging.

  1. Bromsgrove to Barnt Green up the infamous Lickey Incline – non-stop
  2. Bolton to Blackburn up the Ribble Valley Line – 4 intermediate stops
  3. Blackburn to Clitheroe up the Ribble Valley Line – 3 intermediate stops
  4. Rose Grove to Colne up the East Lancashire Line – 5 intermediate stops
  5. Exeter St. Davids to Barnstaple up the Tarka Line – 10 intermediate stops
  6. Plymouth to Gunnislake up the Tamar Valley Line – 7 intermediate stops
  7. Cardiff Central to Aberdate up the Aberdare Branch of the Methyr Line – 13 intermediate stops
  8. Cardiff Central to Ebbw Vale Town up the Ebbw Valley Railway – 5 intermediate stops
  9. Cardiff Central to Merthyr Tydfil up the Merthyr Line – 13 intermediate stops
  10. Cardiff Central to Rhymney up the Rhymney Line – 16 intermediate stops
  11. Cardiff Central to Treherbert up the Rhondda Line – 16 intermediate stops

Our Victorian engineers never let a steep gradient get in the way of where they wanted to build a railway.

Could These Lines Be Electrified?

Only the Lickey Incline (1) is currently being electrified. This is a description of the incline from Wikipedia.

The Lickey Incline, south of Birmingham, is the steepest sustained main-line railway incline in Great Britain. The climb is a gradient of 1 in 37.7 (2.65% or 26.5‰ or 1.52°) for a continuous distance of two miles (3.2 km)

Youtube has a great deal of modern and historic video of the Lickey Incline. Some recent footage shows freight trains climbing the incline with the assistance of a banking engine at the rear.

I doubt if the two lines in Devon (5 and 6) will ever be electrified, The Campaign for the Protection of Rural England will never allow overhead wiring gantries to despoil the landscape along the routes, some of which is in a National Park.

If the Class 319 Flex train does a good job with the three Lancashire Lines around Blackburn (2,3 and 4), the decision to electrify will be pushed a decade or more into the future. I could certainly see, Bombardier, Stadler and perhaps a couple of other companies building a train based on the experience with a Class 319 Flex train, as a replacement.

Politicians will decide whether the Cardiff Valley Lines (7 to 11) are electrified, but I have a feeling that someone somewhere will have a better alternative to full traditional electrification.

The Cardiff Valley Lines

Consider these facts about the rail service on the Cardiff Valley Lines

  • The lines are a vital lifeline to those that live in the South Wales Valleys.
  • The area is not without its attraction, for those who like to be in the hills.
  • Traffic on the lines varies throughout the day.
  • Traffic up the Valleys is highest in the evening commuting Peak and after a big sporting event in Cardiff.
  • Four-car trains are needed on the route.
  • The current diesel trains are elderly and unreliable.
  • There are plans to open new lines and stations and extend some of the existing lines further to the North.

But above all jobs and business and housing developments are needed in the Valleys.

An improved rail service could benefit a large number of people and interests.

The Class 319 Flex Train

The Class 319 Flex train started operational service  thirty years ago as a 100 mph express commuter train running on the Thameslink route from Bedford to Brighton.

It may be a comparatively old train, but it has the following characteristics.

  • It is based on the legendary Mark 3 coach, as used on the InterCity 125.
  • It is four-cars.
  • It is a dual-voltage train.
  • Two rail-proven MAN diesels and an ABB alternator provide electric power away from electrification.
  • It is a 100 mph train on an electrified main line.
  • It has a speed of around 90 mph on diesel power.
  • Drivers have told me, that the brakes are superb.
  • It has a good reputation for reliability.
  • It meets all the current disabled regulations.

But about all, like all Mark 3-based stock, it scrubs up well to any desired standard. In What Train Is This?, I showed the interior of a refurburbished thirty-year-old Class 150 train. Unrefurbished examples are typical of the stock that work the challenging lines.

Use Of A Railbaar With A Class 319 Flex Train

Porterbrook have said that the train’s electrical layout with a DC busbar connecting all xars, lends itself to adding a battery, which could be charged using the diesel power.

A typical layout of the Class 319 Flex train could be as follows.

  • DTOC – A driving car with a diesel engine/alternator set underneath.
  • PMOS – A motor car with a pantograph.
  • TOSL – A trailer car with a toilet.
  • DTOS – A driving car with a diesel engine/alternator set underneath.

I suspect that the battery would go under the TOSL.

The connection points for a Railbaar would be on the uncluttered roof of this car.

Railbaar would be a good add-on for a Class 319 Flex train, working an extension or branch line from an electrified line.

Possible Class 319 Flex Train Problems

The Class 319 train has two possible problems; the body is made of steel and the braking is not regenerative.

Despite being steel, their weight at 140 tonnes is lighter than many aluminium bodied trains, but they don’t have all the equipment like air-conditioning.

On the other hand, a similar train to a Class 319, survived the Oxshott Incident, where a 24-tonne cement mixer truck fell off a bridge onto the roof of the train.

Some Class 321 trains, which are similar to the Class 319 train, have been rebuilt with regenerative braking, so if that becomes a necessity for the Class 319 Flex train, I suspect an engineering solution is possible. Especially, as there is over a hundred Class 321 trains, which will be coming off-lease soon.

The Class 319 Flex Train And The Cardiff Valley Lines

There are eighty-six Class 319 trains, so there would be no problems finding a donor train to convert into a trial train for the Cardiff Valley Lines, if the Class 319 Flex train performs successfully on the Buxton Line.

  • On the Buxton Line, trains climb 150 metres in 15 kilometres from the electrified station at Hazel Grove to Buxton.
  • On the Merthyr Line, trains climb 168 metres in about 30 kilometres from Cardiff to Merthyr Tydfil.

So it looks like Buxton is steeper, but the Merthyr Line is longer.

I suspect that a Class 319 Flex train will go into service on a trial basis in South Wales, to test performance and customer reaction.

If nothing, it will help define the specification for the trains that can work the Cardiff Valley Lines.

Energy Needed To Raise A Train To Merthyr Tydfil

I will make these assumptions.

  • Merthyr Tydfil has an altitude of 179 metres.
  • Cardiff Central station has an altitude of 11 metres.
  • The train must be raised 168 metres
  • A Class 319 train has a weight of 140 tonnes.
  • A Class 319 train has a seated capacity of 319.
  • A suitable battery would weigh about 2 tonnes.

Raising an empty  four-car train similar to a Class 319 train, from Cardiff Central to Merthyr Tydfil will require 23,856,000 Kg-m or 65  KwH of energy.

Assuming a full load of 319 passengers at 80 Kg a time and that adds another 4,287,360 Kg-m or 12 KwH of energy.

My calculations are very rough.

The passengers get out at the top, so they are not energy that will be regenerated on the way down.

An Electrification Scheme For The Cardiff Valley Lines

The Cardiff Valley Lines were built with the main purpose of bringing coal from the valleys to the port of Cardiff for distribution and export by ship.

Now passengers are much more important, with commuting , leisure and tourism prominent.

Coming down is never a problem and a battery electric train with good brakes could handle a full load of passengers with few problems.

Going up is the problem, as the evening peak or a big rugby match in Cardiff can result in a full train having to be hauled up the valleys.

Similar problems are encountered on all the lines in my list to a certain extent, but without seeing the figures, I suspect the Cardiff Valley Lines are some of the most challenging.

Porterbrook have said, that they are not against using batteries on a Class 319 Flex train as a boost on difficult climbs.

So I think that a Class 319 Flex train fitted with an appropriate-sized battery could be a starting point.

But there is one big problem with a Class 319 Flex train. The Class 319 trains do not have regenerative braking, which could be used to charge the batteries on the way down from the valleys.

However, the very similar Class 321 train is being fitted with regenerative braking, so a possible Class 321 Flex train could charge the batteries on the way down.

When the train arrived in Cardiff, it could attach to a Railbaar to make sure that when it left to climb up into the valleys, the batteries were fully charged.

I think that in all these ramblings, there will be a solution, where all the various technologies come together in a bespoke solution.

  • Four-car train.
  • Electric drive.
  • 25 KVAC overhead to work electrified routes on the South Wales Main Line, at 100 mph.
  • Onboard rail-proven diesel engines and alternators, which would be used accordingly and probably automatically!
  • Two diesel power units would be used, so that one failure wouldn’t leave a stranded train.
  • Batteries with a capacity of around 100 KwH
  • Powerful regenerative braking
  • Railbaars in Cardiff and other low-altitude terminal stations, could be used if diesel charging can’t be used.
  • Well-driven trains to an energy efficient timetable.

Obviously, any electrification of the Cardiff ends of the routes would be welcome and less diesel-power would be needed.

Conclusions

Railbaar would be a good add-on for a Class 319 Flex train, working an extension or branch line from an electrified line.

A Class 319 Flex train with a battery and regenerative braking could be very useful on challenging routes like the Cardiff Valley Lines.

With these applications,  strategically placed Railbaars could add to the resilience and efficiency of the system.

The bespoke solution, that I have outlined, is very close to the specification of a Class 319 Flex train with a battery and regenerative braking.

I can’t wait to ride a Class 319 Flex train on a proving run to Merthyr Tydfil.

 

 

 

 

 

April 12, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Along The Avocet Line

I took these pictures on a trip from Exeter to Exmouth and back on the Avocet Line.

These are my thoughts under various topics.

Exmouth

Exmouth reminded me of the seaside town, where I spent a fair bit of my childhood; Felixstowe.

  • They are both coastal towns.
  • Exmouth has the larger population of 34,400 to Felixstowe’s 23,000.
  • Both have adequate shopping centres, although Exmouth has a large Marks and Spencer Simply Food by the station.

I didn’t get to the beach.

The Starcross And Exmouth Ferry

There is a ferry between Starcross station and Exmouth, which seems to be well used.

Exmouth Station And The Train Service

Exmouth station was rebuilt in 1986 and it is a one-platform station with facilities and a large Marks and Spencer Simply Food.

The only problem is the trains themselves, as their frequency, which is generally two trains per hour, is acceptable.

But two Class 143 trains coupled together is inadequate, for a summer’s day when passengers have buggies, bicycles and lots of young children.

Monkerton Station

Monkerton station is a proposed new station on the Avocet Line, that would be built between Polsloe Bridge and Digby & Sowton.

The Seaside Special

Exmouth station and the Avocet Line powerfully makes the case for a Seaside Special train.

  • Four cars.
  • Independently-powered by diesel or perhaps batteries in the future.
  • A range of perhaps thirty miles.
  • Lots of space for buggies, bicycles and large suitcases.
  • Step-across access between platform and train.

I’m sure Greater Anglia and Great Western Railway, with help from other train operating companies could come up with workable specification.

Get the specification right and it might be the short distance commuter train, where a proportion of passengers want to bring bicycles.

With the current developments in train refurbishment, the new Class 319 Flex and Class 230 trains might be the place to start.

 

 

 

April 7, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Interchange At Burscough

Burscough in Lancashire is a large village, where the Manchester to Southport Line and the Ormskirk Branch Line cross.

This Google Map shows the two stations; Burscough Bridge on the line to Manchester and Burscough Junction on the line through Ormskirk.

The maps show shadows of railway embankments, which are the remains of the Burscough Curves, that once connected Ormkirk station in the South and Preston station in the North to Southport in the West.

In Extra Services To Southport On Merseyrail’s Northern Line, my calculations brought me to the following conclusions.

Combining Merseyrail’s Northern Line services to Southport and Ormskirk in a loop via a reinstated South Burscough Curve, means the following.

  • Southport gets eight trains per hour (tph) to and from Liverpool – 4 tph via Formby and 4 tph via Ormskirk.
  • Ormskirk gets four tph to and from Liverpool.
  • All stations on the Northern Line get four direct or single-change tph from Hunts Cross, Southport and Liverpool Central stations.
  • Ormskirk to Southport and all intermediate stations get 4 tph in both directions.
  • The service can be run by less trains than needed for independent operation from Liverpool to Southport and Otmskirk.

Southport to Ormskirk needs third-rail electrification.

There were a some subsidiary conclusions.

  • Ormskirk station can be based on a single platform with a passing loop, which could allow Liverpool-Preston services.
  • Ormskirk station could still run the current Ormskirk to Preston service.
  • The third-rail electrification between Southport and Burscough Bridge stations could be used by Class 319 Flex train,.working services between Southport and Manchester.
  • Southport could become an all electric station.

I suspect that others could do much better.

So it does show that British Rail dropped everyone deep in the doo-dah, by closing the South Burscough Curve to passenger trains in 1962.

Walking Between Burscough Bridge And Burscough Junction Stations

This set of pictures shows how I walked between to Burscough Junction station from Burscough Bridge station after arriving from Southport.

I did the walk in time, but with one tph between Ormskirk and Preston, I wonder how many people try it and then wait for nearly an hour to catch a train.

Pictures Of The Burscough Curves

From the train, I took these pictures of the Burscough Curves.

At least the bridges appear to be there.

Electrification Of The Burscough Curves

There are three bridges in the tangle of lines around Burscough, that could have electrified lines go underneath.

  1. The bridge at Burscough Bridge station.
  2. The bridge at Burscough Junction station.
  3. The bridge where the two rail lines cross.

Looking at the pictures of bridges 1 and 2, I think that they would have to be rebuilt for 25 KVAC overhead electrification, but only at great inconvenience to the local community.

I also suspect that bridge 3 is rather old but in good condition. Is it low as well?

Third-rail electrification around the South Burscough Curve to allow Southport to Ormskirk services, would be fine, if Health and Safety would allow it as an extension to Merseyrail’s Northern Line.

The Class 319 Flex Train

I must give a brief list of the characteristics of the Class 319 Flex train.

  • Four cars
  • Full dual-voltage electrical system, enabling running on 750 VDC third-rail or 25 KVAC overhead electrification.
  • On-board rail-proven diesel engines for lines without electrification.
  • The Class 319 Flex is a 100 mph train using electrification.
  • The Class 319 Flex is a 90 mph train using diesel.
  • It is probably reasonable that at each stop, they save at least a minute compared to a Pacer or a Class 150 train.
  • They can deputise for electric Class 319 trains on electrified lines.

They are compatible with the West Coast Main Line and Merseyrail’s third-rail network.

Electrification Of Southport To Manchester

If Burscough Bridge to Southport were to be electrified using third-rail for Merseyrail, then it would probably be sensible to use it for the trains on the Manchester to Southport service, on the section of line they would share.

Currently trains take the following times.

  • Southport to Burscough Bridge – 12 minutes.
  • Burscough Bridge to Wigan Wallgate – 16 minutes.
  • Wigan Wallgate to Bolton – 17 minutes
  • Wigan Wallgate to Salford Crescent via Atherton – 34 minutes

By the end of this year, Bolton should be electrified to Manchester Piccadilly, Victoria and Airport stations.

Dual voltage Class 319 trains could probably work from Manchester to Southport with a voltage changeover at Burscough Bridge, if overhead electrification went that far.

But that is unlikely to happen in the near future.

Southport To Manchester By Class 319 Flex

But as Northern will have Class 319 Flex trains with a dual-voltage capability and on-board diesel engines to bridge any electrification gaps, we could be seeing Southport to Manchester services running as follows.

  • Southport to Burscough Bridge – 750 VDC third rail.
  • Burscough Bridge to Bolton or Salford Crescent – diesel.
  • Bolton or Salford Crescent to Manchester – 25 KVAC overhead.

Hopefully, extra electrification in the  future, will shorten the diesel leg.

Southport To Wigan Wallgate By Class 319 Flex

Before looking at times for the full journeys from Southport, I will look at the possible times that can be achieved by a Class 319 Flex train between Southport and Wigan Wallgate.

For this estimate, I will use or assume the following.

  • Current timings betweens Southport to Wigan Wallgate are probably timed for a 75 mph Pacer.
  • Fast services, which go to Manchester Airport,  take 28 minutes and stop five times
  • Slow services, which go to Manchester Victoria, take 36 minutes and stop eight times
  • There is no electrification .
  • The service will be run on diesel power.
  • There are no other services between Southport and Wigan Wallgate.

I have taken a detailed look at the line on a map and it is a fairly straight double track railway with a couple of level crossings.

It is reasonable to assume that the Class 319 Flex train with its faster stops could save five and eight minutes for fast and slow services respectively.

This compares with five and six minutes if you adjust times by the speed of the trains.

So it would be reasonable to assume that a fast service between Southport and Wigan Wallgate will take perhaps between 22-23 minutes, with a slow service taking 28-29 minutes.

If Southport to Burscough Bridge were to be electrified for Merseyrail Northern Line services, I think it is reasonable to assume that these figures could be reduced by a couple of minutes.

Add in a few selective improvements and the removal of the level crossings and I would expect that Class 319 Flex trains could achieve the following times between Southport and Wigan Wallgate.

  • A fast service with five stops in twenty minutes, which is a reduction of eight minutes.
  • A slow service with eight stops in twenty-five minutes, which is a reduction of eleven minutes.

Would Northern be tempted to run four tph on the route?

Kirkby To Wigan Wallgate By Class 319 Flex

Can the same logic, that I have applied to the Southport to Wigan Wallgate route be applied to Kirkby to Wigan Wallgate?

For this estimate, I will use or assume the following.

  • Current timings betweens Kirkby to Wigan Wallgate are probably timed for a 75 mph Pacer.
  • Services take 24 minutes and stop four times
  • There is only one tph, which after Wigan Wallgate goes on to Manchester Victoria.
  • There is no electrification .
  • The service will be run on diesel power.
  • There are no other services between Kirkby and Wigan Wallgate.

I have taken a detailed look at the line on a map and it is a fairly straight railway with a mixture of single and double track, a longish tunnel and some stone overbridges. It could be difficult to electrify.

It is reasonable to assume that the Class 319 Flex train with its faster stops could save four minutes on the jorney.

This is the same, if you adjust times by the speed of the trains.

A time of twenty minutes between Kirkby and Wigan Wallgate, should be easy to attain.

Southport To Manchester Airport By Class 319 Flex

For this estimate, I will use or assume the following.

  • On current timings Southport to Manchester Airport takes 88 minutes, which is probably timed for a 75 mph Pacer.
  • Manchester to Preston electrification via Bolton is completed.
  • The service goes via Bolton
  • Southport to Bolton will be run on diesel.
  • Bolton to Manchester Airport will use the wires.
  • Southport to Wigan Wallgate can be done in twenty minutes.

From Wigan Wallgate  to Bolton, consider the following factors.

  • There will only be a maximum of two scheduled passenger trains between Southport and Bolton on any part of the route, if you include Kirkby services.
  • There is just two stops.
  • The current time is 17 minutes.

Dropping the time in proportion to the train speed gives about 14 minutes

But the biggest savings will come out of the 43 minutes from Bolton to Manchester Airport, which will be electrified.

Unfortunately, I can’t find any reliable estimate of the electrified timing between Bolton and Manchester Airport.

An estimate based on train speed, says that a Class 319 running using electricity could do the journey in 36 minutes.

Adding up the various legs gives 20+14+36=70

So we could be looking at a saving of a eighteen minutes or so from Southport to Manchester Airport.

Currently, the service takes 88 minutes, which means an out-and-back service is probably twenty minutes or more over three hours.

But knock a eighteen minutes off each leg and the out-and-back time could be well under three hours.

An hourly service between Southport and Manchester Airport could probably be achieved with just three trains in a time dropping around seventy minutes.

Northern would love that!

Southport To Manchester Victoria By Class 319 Flex

For this estimate, I will use or assume the following.

  • On current timings Southport to Manchester Victoria takes 79 minutes, which is probably timed for a 75 mph Pacer.
  • The service goes via Atherton
  • Wigan Wallgate to Manchester Victoria takes 41 minutes with 8 stops.
  • Southport to Salford Crescent will be run on diesel.
  • Salford Crescent to Manchester Victoria will use the wires.
  • Southport to Wigan Wallgate can be done in twenty minutes, which means that 61 minutes is possible for Southport to Manchester Victoria

There isn’t the scope for saving time because of electrification, as the wired area is short,

But consider.

  • The Class 319 train was designed as a 100 mph commuter special, so it must be able to save at least a minute at most of the stops, by good driving making use of the train’s excellent brakes and acceleration.
  • Southport to Salford Crescent via Atherton only carries two tph, if you include the Kirkby services.

Two estimates can be generated.

  • Saving a minute a stop gives a time of 53 minutes.
  • Applying a rough calculation based on the increased performance of the Class 319 Flex train gives a time of 54 minutes.

If I were the boss of Northern, I’d be dreaming of a journey time of sixty minutes between Southport and Manchester Victoria.

It’s not impossible, providing that the Class 319 Flex trains can cut the time on the Southport end of the line.

Why Not Electrify Both Routes To Wigan Wallgate From Manchester?

There are two routes between Manchester and Wigan Wallgate station.

  • The soon to be partially-electrified route via Bolton.
  • The Atherton Line from Salford Crescent.

If these routes were to be electrified, it would mean that all Southport and Kirkby services to and from Manchester would be electrified South of Wigan Wallgate.

This would mean various service improvements.

  • All Southport and Kirkby services would be run by four-car Class 319 Flex trains.
  • Southport to Manchester Airport would be under seventy minutes.
  • Southport to Manchester Piccadilly would be under sixty minutes.
  • Southport to Manchester Victoria could be around fifty minutes.
  • Kirkby to Manchester Victoria could also be around fifty minutes.
  • Extra services could probably be run to intermediate stations, to give a highly-desirable four tph.

I don’t known how much freight and other traffic there is on these routes, but as they are both electrified at their Manchester ends, I don’t think that electrification would be that difficult.

Electrification from Manchester to Wigan Wallgate and using Class 319 Flex trains might be a simpler and more affordable strategy than electrifying all the way to Southport and Kirkby.

As both routes connect Salford Crescent and Wigan Wallgate stations, there’s even scope to divert services during any blockades, needed for the electrification.

How Will Ormskirk To Preston Services Be Affected?

The first part of this section starts with a repeat of what I said in Could Kirkdale Station Become A Busy Interchange On Merseyrail?

The current service between Ormskirk and Preston, is an occasional hourly train along the line. Often it is just a single Class 153 train, although last time it was two.

It was also surprisingly clean and full.

But the line deserves better.

  • The frequency of trains should be at least 2 tph to Preston
  • They should also connect better with trains to Liverpool and Southport.
  • Could the trains go beyond Preston?

Perhaps the solution is to link trains between somewhere like Kirkdale and Colne or Blackpool.

I suspect that Merseyrail have their own ideas.

The current service takes 30 minutes between Ormskirk and reston and its likely with some track improvements, that a Class 319 Flex train could reduce this time to perhaps 20-22 minutes.

This time saving would be an advantage, as it would allow a train to shuttle between the two stations maintaining an hourly clockface schedule, which could be timed to arrive at a convenient point in the schedule of trains going between Liverpool and Southport.

There are probably three main patterns for the Preston train.

  1. They shuttle Preston-Ormskirk-Southport-Ormskirk-Preston using reverses at Ormskirk(2) and Southport.
  2. They shuttle Preston-Ormskirk-Southport-Preston using reverses at Ormskirk and Southport and a reinstated North Burscough Curve.
  3. They shuttle between Preston and Ormskirk as now.

Option 1 would just take longer than an hour to return to Preston and the driver would have to do a lot of walking.

Option 2 would probably have the problems of Option 1 and the expense of reinstating the North Burscough Curve.

Option 3 would probably work with perhaps a passing loop added to the current platform layout, as I proposed in Extra Services To Southport On Merseyrail’s Northern Line.

In the following consider that the long platform at Ormskirk is divided into two.

  • The Liverpool platform is the part of the platform that handles trains to and from Liverpool
  • The Preston platform is the part of the platform that handles trains to and from Preston

This could be the sequence of arrivals and departures.

  • xx:00 – Train arrives from Preston into the Preston Platform and drops passengers for Liverpool and Southport.
  • xx:04 – Train arrives from Southport and waits at the entry to the passing loop behind the train from Preston.
  • xx:05 – Train arrives from Liverpool into the Liverpool Platform and departs for Southport after dropping and picking up passengers.
  • xx:08 – Train from Southport uses the passing loop to move to the Liverpool Platform and departs for Liverpool after dropping and picking up passengers.
  • xx:10 – Train departs for Preston from Preston Platform, after picking up passengers from Liverpool and Southport.

In this set of movements, the only driver who has to change ends, would be the driver of the Preston shuttle train and they would have ten minutes or so in which to do the walk.

Get the sequence right and passengers would only wait for a few minutes, whilst changing trains.

The only complication would be that the train from Liverpool would have to pass the train from Southport waiting to enter the station.

It would need some form of double passing loop, which is probably standard practice.

There are obviously other solutions, that use the current single platform at Ormskirk, without the need to add any new infrastructure at the station except for some appropriate track and signalling changes.

Conclusions

To my untrained eye, it looks like reinstating the two Burscough Curves wouldn’t be the most difficult of projects.

But electrifying through the area, could be tricky for the following reasons.

  • Some of the bridges might need to be rebuilt for overhead electrification.
  • Merseyrail would want third-rail electrification to allow Ormskirk and Southport services to be run as a loop for maximum efficiency.
  • Health and Safety.

And critics wonder why Network Rail are so costly and slow with electrification.

But there is one place for more electrification.

Services to Southport and Kirkby would be improved, if the routes to Wigan Wallgate from Bolton and Salford Crescent were both both fully electrified.

This would bring Manchester Piccadilly and Victoria within an hour of both Southport and Kirkby.

To sum up the following should be done.

  • Reinstate the South Burscough Curve.
  • Electrify Ormskirk to Southport using third-rail electrification.
  • Electrify Bolton to Wigan Wallgate using overhead electrification.
  • Electrify Salford Crescent to Wigan Wallgate using overhead electrification.
  • Northern would also need to acquire some more Class 319 Flex trains.

In the interim, it looks like that just running the services between Manchester and Southport using the Class 319 Flex trains will give Northern and its customers a lot of benefits.

In the future, Northern might like to replace the stop-gap Class 319 Flex trains with bi-mode versions of their new Class 331 trains.

 

March 25, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Heritage Railways And Class 319 Flex Trains

Heritage Railways In The UK

Wikipedia introduces their Heritage Railway entry by saying this.

A heritage railway is a railway kept to carry living history rail traffic in order to re-create or preserve railway scenes of the past. Often heritage railways are old railway lines preserved in a state which depicts a certain period, or periods, in the history of railway systems.

But that doesn’t mean heritage railways in the UK are not run to the best professional standards.

The Class 319 Flex Train

The Class 319 Flex Train is an electro-diesel  version of the Class 319 Train, originally built in the 1980s to serve the Thameslink routes.

These trains are almost as old as the classic Range Rovers., but they have probably been looked after to much higher standards.

Some trains have recently undergone a light refurbishment and are now working electric services for Northern in North-West England.

Northern would run more of the trains, if Network Rail had been able to stick to their electrification timetable.

So Northern and the train rolling stock leasing company; Porterbrook have decided to create the electro-diesel version by installing two rail-proven MAN diesels and an ABB alternator. The train will be able to generate its own electricity and thus work lines without electrification.

I have seen an advance copy of the brochure and the train combines the 100 mph capability of the original trains with the ability to work the very stiff Buxton Line.

Porterbrook describe the train as a Go-Anywhere Solution.

Through Services Onto Heritage Lines

I don’t know how many heritage lines run services that are habitually used by commuters going to school, college or on business, but there have been and might still are be heritage lines where this happens.

The next sections give my thoughts on possible connections and services.

Severn Valley Railway

The Severn Valley Railway runs for a distance of 16 miles between Kidderminster Town and Brignorth stations.

At Kidderminster, there is a connection to the Birmingham to Worcester Line.

This Google Map shows the two adjoining Kidderminster stations.

There is a section called Other Operational Extensions in the Wikipedia entry for the Severn Valley Railway, where this is said.

The General Manager, Nick Ralls has confirmed that Chiltern Railways have approached the Severn Valley Railway with a view to extending a number of its peak-time Marylebone to Kidderminster services to Bewdley to alleviate road congestion in the Kidderminster/Stourport/Bewdley area. This has raised questions regarding car parking limitations near Bewdley station. Should this go ahead the distinction between a heritage railway and a contemporary railway operation would be blurred. In conjunction with this there have been suggestions for locating a Park and Ride facility near Foley Park Halt. Investigations are in-hand to construct a station to serve a conference centre and hotel to be located at the West Midlands Safari Park.

Consider.

  • According to Wikipedia, it is a future aspiration of Network Rail to electrify the entire Birmingham to Worcester via Kidderminster Line, as well as the Chiltern Main Line to London Marylebone.
  • If Chiltern Railways could run to Bewdley station, surely a Class 319 Flex train could run a service to the Severn Valley Railway from anywhere between Kidderminster and Birmingham.
  • If the electrification ever happens, a Class 319 Flex train could run under the wires to Kidderminster and then use diesel power to Bewdley or even Brignorth.

When does a heritage and tourist railway become a commuter route?

Swanage Railway

The Swanage Railway are working on  a connection to the main line at Wareham station.

This Google Map shows Wareham station in the North East corner, with the South Western Main Line running across the image.

Wareham Station And The Swanage Railway

Wareham Station And The Swanage Railway

In the South West corner of the map, a junction can be seen, where the Swanage Railway joins from the South.

As the Class 319 Flex train would probably be a train fully-certified to go on any line, where the Class 319 train can run, it could run from say Poole or Bournemouth stations to the terminus of the Swanage Railway at Swanage via the iconic Corfe Castle.

  • I think that Bournemouth station could turnback a local service to Swanage station.
  • The Class 319 Flex train would use the third-rail electrification on the main line.
  • On the main line, it would be a 100 mph train, just like the Class 444 trains working the line to Waterloo.
  • The train would use diesel power to Swanage.
  • I don’t think much new infrastructure would be needed, once the connection at Wareham is finished.Is a Class 319 train old enough to count as heritage? I suppose it’s fake with a couple of modern German diesels!

It could work as both a local train service and a tourist attraction.

 

March 22, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Could There Be A Battery-Powered Class 319 Flex Train?

In the advance copy of the brochure for the Class 319 Flex train, that Porterbrook have sent me, there is a few comments about using batteries on the train.

This strong statement is Porterbrook’s view on a battery-option for the train.

A large battery option was shown to be heavy, would require a lot of space and have long recharge times.

But Porterbrook are also quoted in the article in Rail Magazine, which is entitled Flex… and flexibility, as saying.

Batteries are definitely doable, but rail will have to overcome the current range limitations for traction power. We think traction battery technology will give you a range of around 20km to 30km [12-18 miles] before needing recharging, and this is not enough for most operators.

But a lot of uses of a battery train are for very short distances.

  • Moving a train in a depot.
  • Moving a train to an electrically-dead siding for overnight parking.
  • Moving a train to a safe evacuation place like the next station after an electrification failure.
  • Moving a train over an electrically-dead section of line.
  • Running on very short branch lines without electrification.
  • Running to a temporary station.
  • Remote start-up of the train.

As the Class 319 train is a DC train, fitting batteries would not need an expensive voltage converter.

Electrically-Dead Stations

The new Health and Safety  regulations as regards electricity in stations are causing Network Rail serious problems and great expense with electrification.

A train with a limited battery option may offer significant safety advantages in that if it had a range of six mile or so on full batteries then stations could be built without electrification.

Third rail systems are often broken in stations for a short distance, so that staff can safely cross the tracks. They are also broken at level crossings.

Most trains including all Class 319 trains have contact shoes at both end of the train and can bridge a short gap.

An onboard battery would allow the trains to bridge larger gaps.

The problem with overhead electrification is that the pantograph must be lowered and raised at the correct times. But this is one of those problems that could be done automatically and safely by systems linked to GPS.

There’s certainly a patent with the name of Pantograph Control Via GPS.

No overhead wires in a station with a rich architectural heritage, may lead to easier and more affordable electrification.

Think Hebden Bridge!

Very Short Branch Lines

Several  branch lines that have been proposed for electrification are less than six miles in length.

  • Brentford – 4 miles
  • Greenford – 2.7 miles
  • Henley – 4.5 miles
  • Levenmouth Rail Link – 5 miles
  • Windsor – 2.5 miles

So if 20 to 30 km. (12-18 mile) range mentioned by Porterbrook is serious, a Class 319 Flex train with batteries instead of diesel engines should be able to handle short branch lines with ease, provided that the batteries could be charged on the main line or in an electrified bay platform.

As electrificastion procedes more opportunities will present themselves.

This Google Map shows the distance between Leeds Bradford Airport and the Harrogate Line.

The Harrogate Line is likely to be electrified in the next tranch of electrification, as most of the other suburban lines from Leeds are already electrified.

The distance between the Airport and the Harrogate Line is probably about a mile, so Class 319 trains fitted with an affordable battery could manage this line.

Battery Technology Will Improve

It should be born in mind that battery technology will get better, thus range will increase for a battery if a given physical size.

A guaranteed twenty mile range would bring these routes into the list of possible routes for a Class 319 train with batteries.

  • Braintree – 6.4 miles
  • Coventry to Nuneaton – 10 miles
  • Marlow – 7.25 miles
  • Windermere – 10 miles

Braintree is interesting, as it needs a passing loop and the cheapest way to do this would be to remove the electrification, update the track and signalling and use an independently-powered train.

Battery Technology On Other Trains

Simpler battery systems like this will be able to be applied to a large number of modern electric trains on UK railways.

Note that I haven’t included the Alstom, CAF, Hitachi, Siemens and Stadler trains running now or in the future.

Will they sit on their hands and watch the other manufacturers’ trains get more efficient? You bet they won’t!

It is also worth noting that some of these trains, unlike the Class 319 trains, have regenerative braking, which could store their braking-generated energy in the battery, rather than returning it to the electrification.

Conclusion

Porterbrook have let a big genie out of the bottle.

 

 

 

March 22, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , | 4 Comments