The Anonymous Widower

Trains Ordered For 2021 Launch Of ‘High-Quality, Low Fare’ London – Edinburgh Service

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Railway Gazette.

This is the first paragraph.

FirstGroup has finalised an order for five Hitachi AT300 electric trainsets which it will use to launch a London – Edinburgh open access service in autumn 2021.

The trains are Class 802 trains, similar to those used by FirstGroup companies; Hull Trains and Great Western Railway.

These are some points from the article.

  • FirstGroup is targeting the two-thirds of passengers, who fly between London and Edinburgh.
  • They are also targeting business passengers, as the first train arrives in Edinburgh at 10:00.
  • The trains are five-cars.
  • The trains are one class with onboard catering, air-conditioning, power sockets and free wi-fi.
  • Stops will be five trains per day with stops at Stevenage, Newcastle and Morpeth.
  • The trains will take around four hours.
  • The service will start in Autumn 2021.

These are my observations.

Earlier Start

I suspect that the service can’t start earlier, due to one of the following.

  • The lead time in building the trains.
  • Completion of the new Werrington Junction.
  • Completion of the sorting of Kings Cross.
  • Completion of the works at Stevenage station.

The track works will probably be needed to create the extra paths needed on the East Coast Main Line.

Electric-Only Trains

Most other Class 802 trains are bi-mode trains, but will these be electric-only?

Capacity Issues

If the trains prove too small, they can just add extra carriages or two trains can run as a pair.

Timetables

Trains will probably take nine hours for a round-trip, allowing 30 minutes for turnround.

This would mean that two trains leaving London and Edinburgh at six, would arrive back at home after two round trips around midnight.

Conclusion

I think it will be a successful service.

March 22, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Werrington Dive-Under – 8th November 2018

In Issue 865 of Rail Magazine, there is an article, which is entitled NR Primed To Start Work On £200m ECML Dive-Under.

This is said about construction of the dive-under.

Devegetation has already commenced in the area, while work compounds and access roads are due to be constructed before the end of the year (when the main construction sequence is expected to begin).

The dive-under is expected to enter service in 2021.

The article also says that the Cock Lane footbridge will be replaced with a longer truss bridge to span the widened alignment.

These pictures show the current Cock Lane footbridge.

Whilst I took the pictures there was a lot of noise from chain saws and other machinery, as the vegetation was cleared.

The Track Layout

Note how the tracks are divided into a set of two on the Western side and three on the Eastern.

The Western pair are the so-called Stamford lines, which go off to the West through Stamford station.

A diagram in Rail Magazine shows how they will be moved apart and twenty-five metres to the West. This will enable the two new tracks to be laid between them, which will then dive under the East Coast Main Line and connect to the Great Northern Great Eastern Joint Line towards Spalding, Sleaford and Doncaster.

This Google Map shows the Cock Lane Bridge as it crosses the tracks.

The Cock Lane Bridge is at the bottom of the map.

Doing The Work

It looks a simple plan, that NR believes could be executed with a nine-day closure of the East Coast Main Line. This would be needed to tunnel under the three tracks of the main line.

But I suspect that Network Rail could have a series of cunning plans to keep a limited service going.

  • There will probably be a number of bi-mode Class 800 trains available.
  • Some of the sixteen InterCity 125 trains could be retained.

The diesels and bi-modes could be able to use the Great Northern Great Eastern Joint Line and other routes without electrification to sneak through.

They might also use an interim layout of lines at Werrington to keep the service going.

Extra Electrification

It appears to me that not all tracks are electrified.

The Northbound Stamford Line certainly has electrification, but it appears that the Southbound doesn’t.

Given that in the next decade, it is likely that battery/electric or electro-diesel trains or locomotives will use the route throughStamford station to Leicester and Nuneaton, would it be worthwhile to fully electrify the Stamford Lines.

This image captured from a Network Rail video, clearly shows the new Cock Lane footbridge and that the following lines are electrified.

  • The Northbound Stamford Line on the left.
  • The three tracks of the East Coast Main Line on the right.

The actual dive-under and the Southbound Stamford Line appear not to have electrification.

Retention Of Diesel Trains

But surely, if there are a few extra diesel trains around for a couple of years or at least until the end of 2019, would it help to sort out some of the other problems on the East Coast Main Line.

 

November 8, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Grayling Gives Green Light To Network Rail ECML Improvements

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

This Google Map shows the Werrington area, just North of Peterborough on the East Coast Main Line.

 

Network Rail have a web page, which describes the Werrington Grade Separation in detail.

This is said.

We will build a new two-track railway line, just over 3km in length, under the East Coast Main Line at Werrington Junction that will enable high-speed trains to pass over the Great Northern Great Eastern Line. North of the Cock Lane footbridge the Stamford Lines would be widened to the west to create four tracks. The central pair of tracks would then dive into a new underpass, below the ECML, and rise to meet the GNGE line approximately 600m after Lincoln Road.

This Google Map shows the Cock Lane footbridge over the East Coast Main Line.

Note the large number of tracks on the East Coast Main line. Those on the |Western side are the Stamford Lines.

This Google Map shows Northern end of the route, where it joins the Great Northern Great Eastern Joint Line.

From the video below, it looks like the new double-track railway crosses the Werrington Parkway and Lincoln Road under new bridges.

Note that video is good, but you will end up on the Network Rail web site, when it finishes. Why can’t they use YouTube like everyone else?

It is certainly a comprehensive scheme, which will stop freight trains slowing the expresses on the East Coast Main Line.

Line Speed And Gauge

The Great Northern Great Eastern Joint Railway has an operating speed of 75 mph and a loading gauge of W10.

From watching the video, the gauge appears to be at least W10 and it appears that the train is not going slowly.

Certainly, it will accommodate the largest freight trains, but will we see passenger services between Peterborough and Lincoln saving time?

Peterborough And Lincoln Passenger Services

Currently, these services are timed for a Class 153 train and it takes 78-80 minutes with five stops.

Building The New Track

I suspect that  the scheme has been designed so that it can be built without causing major disruption to the trains on the East Coast Main Line.

The single-track Acton Dive Under was successfully built with only minor disruption to Great Western Main Line services, so Network Rail have good form in this area. I talked about this in The Acton Dive-Under From The Noel Road Bridge.

August 15, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment