The Anonymous Widower

Extending The Elizabeth Line – Connecting Great Western Main Line Services To The Central Tunnel

If say it was ever needed to run a train between Oxford or Swindon stations and the Central Tunnel of the Elizabeth Line, three things must be possible.

Trains Would Have To Be Compatible With The Central Tunnel Of The Elizabeth Line

As any train would have to be compatible with the platform-edge doors in the central tunnel of the Elizabeth Line, the trains would have to be dimensionally identical to the current Class 345 trains.

  • Nine cars
  • Possibility of lengthening to ten cars.
  • 204.73 metres long.
  • 6 sets of doors per carriage
  • Ability to run under full digital signalling.

I covered this in detail in Extending The Elizabeth Line – High Speed Trains On The Elizabeth Line.

Trains Would Need A 125 mph Capability To Travel On The Fast Lines Of The Great Western Main Line

They would be designed for a higher speed of at least 110 or 125 mph, to enable running on the fast lines.

The faster running would ease scheduling of the trains.

Effectively, the train would be a Class 345 train with more features and considerably more grunt.

Trains Must Be Able To Connect Between The Fast Lines And The Central Tunnel Of The Elizabeth Line At Royal Oak

This map from cartometro.com shows the track layout at Royal Oak.

Note.

  1. The Elizabeth Line is shown in purple.
  2. Great Western Railway (GWR)  tracks are shown in black.
  3. Where the Elizabeth Line shares the tracks with GWR services the tracks are shown in black and purple.

This map shows an enlargement of Kensal Green East Junction in the North-West corner of the previous map.

Note.

  1. The top pair of lines lead to the Elizabeth Line Depot at Old Oak Common.
  2. the pair of lines that are shown in black and purple handle Elizabeth Line and GWR local services.
  3. The pair of black lines are the Great Western Main Line.
  4. North Pole Depot is used by GWR for their Hitachi trains.

 

This map shows an enlargement between Ladbroke Grove Junction and Royal Oak.

Note.

  1. In the South-East corner of the map is Subway junction, which appears to have two crossovers for maximum flexibility.
  2. To the East of Subway junction the curved line indicates the Royal Oak Portal of the Elizabeth Line Central Tunnel.
  3. To the West of Subway junction, there is Paddington New Yard, where there is five tracks labelled CRL Eastbound, Turnback C, Turnback B, Turnback A and CRL Westbound from North to South.
  4. Turnback C, Turnback B and Turnback A are the three turnback sidings, where trains are turned back East through the Elizabeth Line Central Tunnel.
  5. CRL Eastbound and CRL Westbound can be followed across the map to the black and purple lines of the Elizabeth Line to the West of Ladbroke Grove junction.
  6. At present the Western section of the Elizabeth Line terminates in Paddington station. Crossovers at Portobello junction appear to connect the Western section of the Elizabeth Line into Paddington station.
  7. More crossovers also appear to connect the Great Western Main Line to the CRL Eastbound and CRL Westbound through Paddington New Yard.

I am fairly sure that the track layout at Royal Oak allows trains to go both ways between Great Western Main Line and the Elizabeth Line Central Tunnel.

September 3, 2022 - Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , ,

8 Comments »

  1. IMO it would be better to arrange cross platform interchange at Reading between GWR and Elizabeth line trains. The latter is mostly for commuters, and the former long distance [with few doors] and running them through the core would result in half empty trains in the rush hour and delayed ingress and egress.

    Comment by R. Mark Clayton | September 3, 2022 | Reply

  2. If you can run back-to-back services through London like Oxford and Southend, you effectively create extra platforms in Paddington and Liverpool Street, where space is at a premium.

    Whether you do or not depends on passenger numbers, which can be ascertained by analysing the tickets sold and used. If you go to a full contactless system, you get more and better information.

    Comment by AnonW | September 3, 2022 | Reply

  3. What do you mean by saying the trains would need more grunt.

    Comment by lawrenceedwardwilsonhotmailcom | September 4, 2022 | Reply

    • Just a bit more power to get up to higher speeds.

      Comment by AnonW | September 4, 2022 | Reply

      • Makes sense, thanks .

        Comment by lawrenceedwardwilsonhotmailcom | September 4, 2022

  4. Relieving pressuring at Paddington & Liverpool Street would be welcome. I grew up in Oxford and I believe services through central London towards the east would be popular. I have zero knowledge about the practicalities of implementing such a service, but I know I would definitely use it.

    Comment by Andy | September 4, 2022 | Reply

  5. TfL and GWR will know what the actual destination of passengers from Oxford, so they could run trains appropriately. If Dear Old Vicky can handle 33 tph, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Central Tunnel of the Lizzie Line be able to handle 36 tph or even 40 tph. With frequencies like that, which are used in several places including Moscow, the problem is not handling the frequency, but having enough platforms to turn the trains. So four tph to places like Oxford and Southend helps to raise the frequency in the Central Tunnel.

    Comment by AnonW | September 4, 2022 | Reply

  6. […] I discuss this in Extending The Elizabeth Line – Connecting Great Western Main Line Services To The Central Tunn…. […]

    Pingback by Extending The Elizabeth Line – High Speed Trains On The Elizabeth Line « The Anonymous Widower | September 6, 2022 | Reply


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