The Anonymous Widower

The Space In A Class 707 Train

This morning I got into an empty Class 707 train at Waterloo station and took these pictures.

They do show the wide aisle and the spacious lobbies by the wide double doors.

I think all suburban trains should be given lots of space like this.

  • It allows for a lot of standees.
  • A high proportion of passengers get a seat.
  • Passengers can circulate from car-to-car to find a seat or perhaps people they know.
  • The space helps quick exit and entry to the train.

Unfortunately, not all suburban trains have such spacious interiors.

These are a selection.

Note these pictures show London Overground’s Class 710 and Class 378 trains and Crossrail’s Class 345 trains.

Seating along the side may not be to everybody’s taste, but it does get a large number of passengers into a train.

Siemans and Bomnardier use very different philosophies, but achieve the same result.

 

October 28, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | 1 Comment

The Footbridges Over The Railway At Lincoln

Both footbridges at Lincoln station over the railway are now complete.

This Google Map shows their location.

These pictures show the bridge at the High Street level crossing, which is the nearest one to the station.

It is not your average footbridge with lifts across a railway.

These pictures show the bridge at the Brayford Wharf East level Crossing, which is the one further to the West.

I like this unusually-designed bridge.

It is not step-free, but it does offer shelter whilst you wait for the level crossing to open.

Conclusion

Lincoln has now got two unusual footbridges over the railway.

 

October 25, 2019 Posted by | Transport, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

A Selection Of Train Noses

I have put together a selection of pictures of train noses.

They are in order of introduction into service.

Class 43 Locomotive

The nose of a Class 43 locomotive was designed by Sir Kenneth Grange.

Various articles on the Internet, say that he thought British Rail’s original design was ugly and that he used the wind tunnel at Imperial College to produce one of the world’s most recognised train noses.

  • He tipped the lab technician a fiver for help in using the tunnel
  • Pilkington came had developed large armoured glass windows, which allowed the locomotives window for two crew.
  • He suggested that British Rail removed the buffers. Did that improve the aerodynamics, with the chisel nose shown in the pictures?

The fiver must be one of the best spent, in the history of train design.

In How Much Power Is Needed To Run A Train At 125 mph?, I did a simple calculation using these assumptions.

  • To cruise at 125 mph needs both engines running flat out producing 3,400 kW.
  • Two locomotives and eight Mark 3 carriages are a ten-car InterCity 125 train.

This means that the train needs 2.83 kWh per vehicle mile.

Class 91 Locomotive

These pictures show the nose of a Class 91 locomotive.

Note, the Class 43 locomotive for comparison and that the Driving Van Trailers have an identical body shell.

It does seem to me, that looking closely at both locomotives and the driving van trailers, that the Class 43s  look to have a smoother and more aerodynamic shape.

Class 800/801/802 Train

These pictures show the nose of a Class 800 train.

In How Much Power Is Needed To Run A Train At 125 mph?, I did a simple calculation to find out the energy consumption of a Class 801 train.

I have found this on this page on the RailUKForums web site.

A 130m Electric IEP Unit on a journey from Kings Cross to Newcastle under the conditions defined in Annex B shall consume no more than 4600kWh.

This is a Class 801 train.

  • It has five cars.
  • Kings Cross to Newcastle is 268.6 miles.
  • Most of this journey will be at 125 mph.
  • The trains have regenerative braking.
  • I don’t know how many stops are included

This gives a usage figure of 3.42 kWh per vehicle mile.

It is a surprising answer, as it could be a higher energy consumption, than that of the InterCity 125.

I should say that I don’t fully trust my calculations, but I’m fairly sure that the energy use of both an Intercity 125 and a Class 801 train are in the region of 3 kWh per vehicle mile.

Class 717 Train

Aerodynamically, the Class 700, 707 and 717 trains have the same front.

But they do seem to be rather upright!

Class 710 Train

This group of pictures show a Class 710 train.

Could these Aventra trains have been designed around improved aerodynamics?

  • They certainly have a more-raked windscreen than the Class 717 train.
  • The cab may be narrower than the major part of the train.
  • The headlights and windscreen seem to be fared into the cab, just as Colin Chapman and other car designers would have done.
  • There seems to be sculpting of the side of the nose, to promote better laminar flow around the cab. Does this cut turbulence and the energy needed to power the train?
  • Bombardier make aircraft and must have some good aerodynamicists and access to wind tunnels big enough for a large scale model of an Aventra cab.

If you get up close to the cab, as I did at Gospel Oak station, it seems to me that Bombardier have taken great care to create a cab, that is a compromise between efficient aerodynamics and good visibility for the driver.

Class 345 Train

These pictures shows the cab of a Class 345 train.

The two Aventras seem to be very similar.

Class 195 And Class 331 Trains

CAF’s Class 195 and Class 331 trains appear to have identical noses.

They seem to be more upright than the Aventras.

Class 755 Train

Class 755 trains are Stadler’s 100 mph bi-mode trains.

It is surprising how they seem to follow similar designs to Bombardier’s Aventras.

  • The recessed windscreen.
  • The large air intake at the front.

I can’t wait to get a picture of a Class 755 train alongside one of Greater Anglia’s new Class 720 trains, which are Aventras.

 

 

 

 

 

October 14, 2019 Posted by | Transport, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Boeing Left Safety Features Off MAX Jet

The title of this post is the same as that of this article in today’s copy of The Times.

It appears Boeing had a similar problem to that on the Boeing 737 MAX, on the KC-36A Pegasus, so they fitted an MCAS system.

This paragraph in the Wikipedia entry gives full details.

On 22 March 2019, the USAF announced it was reviewing KC-46 training after the Boeing 737 MAX groundings, as the KC-46 uses a similar Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) to that implicated in two 737 MAX crashes. However, the KC-46 is based on the Boeing 767-2C and its system takes input from dual redundant angle of attack sensors; it will disengage with stick input by the pilot. The Air Force stated that “The KC-46 has protections that ensure pilot manual inputs have override priority” and that it “does not fly the models of aircraft involved in the recent accidents” and that it is “reviewing our procedures and training as part of our normal and ongoing review process.

Note that there are dual redundant angle of attack sensors and the pilot takes control from the MCAS system, in the traditional manner.

These two features are not fitted on a 737 MAX.

Was the cost too great to maintain sales?

October 1, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Wrong Kind Of Bleach?

This article on Railnews is entitled 9 September: News In Brief.

It has the following sub-title.

Wrong Bleach Took Caledonian Sleepers Out Of Service

This is the first sentence.

Cleabers who used the wrong specification of bleach in the toilets and shower rooms on Caledonian Sleepers caused significant damage after the chemicals reacted with stainless steel pipes,

To my knowledge stainless steel, especially when it contains increased levels of chromium and some molybdenum, can be very proof to attack from most substances.

Look at this Butler Shba cutlery made in Sheffield from stainless steel with black Delrin plastic handles, which have seen continuous use in my household for fifty years.

Now that’s what I call stainless steel!

Perhaps, the Spanish used the wrong type of stainless steel?

Delrin is a form of polyoxymethylene, which is an engineering plastic.

This plastic has a wide spectrum of usage, including in zips, bagpipes and metered dose inhalers, to name just three of hundreds.

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Climbing Stairs Two At A Time

This set of stairs is at Syon Lane station.

It is typical of many sets of stairs in London and all over the UK.

I have recently found that it is easier and faster for me to climb stairs like these, two steps at a time.

Sometimes, I will climb up the right side of the stairs pulling myself with my good right arm.

I can understand, why when using my good arm, it is easier and faster, as I am pushing with two limbs and pulling with one.

But the surprise is that if I walk up the middle of the stairs, it’s easier too!

Is it down to the fact that most stairs are to the same standard, which was designed to fit the mechanics of the average human.

I suspect too, that practice helps.

September 8, 2019 Posted by | World | , , , | Leave a comment

The New Bathgate Depot

As I passed through Bathgate station, I took these photographs of the new Bathgate depot.

This Google Map shows the station with its extension car parking and the depot.

Note how the layout is so much simpler, than most depots in the UK, which were designed over a hundred years ago.

September 3, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

My First Ride In An Inter7City Train

These are some pictures I took of a ride between Edinburgh and Leuchars station.

In some ways, I wasn’t particularly impressed and the interiors were not up to the standard of some InterCity125 trains and Mark 3 coaches I’ve ridden lately.

These are some other pictures of Inter7City trains, I took on my recent trip to Scotland.

They may look nice and are what the public wanted, but would the right new trains have been better.

 

August 21, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Traction System Of A Class 385 Train

This document on the Hitachi web site is entitled Development of Class 385 Semi-customised/Standard Commuter Rolling Stock for Global Markets.

The Hitachi document gives a schematic of the traction system of a Class 385 train.

This is the description, that accompanies the diagram.

Railway businesses in the UK include ROSCOs, TOCs, and track maintenance and management companies. The TOCs pay fees, called track access charges, which are based on the weight of rolling stock and the distance travelled, and are obliged to pay the track maintenance and management company for the electrical power consumed in train operation. Because lighter trains put less load on the track, they incur lower track access charges. As lighter trains also consume less electrical power, there was strong demand from the TOC to make the rolling stock lighter, right from the pre-contract stage.

There are two types of Class 385, a four-car train set and a three-car train set. The four-car train set has two motor cars (M) and two trailer cars (T) in what is called a 2M2T configuration. For a three-car train set, in contrast, sufficient traction capacity is provided by 1.5 M cars. Accordingly, the Class 385 adopts a system in which the traction unit (converter) is split into two drive systems, with each car having two motor bogies that are controlled separately (see Fig. 4). This means that three-car train sets can have a 1.5M1.5T configuration in which one of the bogies on one of the two M cars is a trailer bogie, thereby eliminating two traction motors and one traction unit drive system. This configuration reduces the weight of a three-car train set by approximately 1.5 tonnes.

Next time you design a train, will you stand more chancw of getting the order, if you think out of the box?

August 10, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

The Lengths Of Hitachi Class 800/801/802 Trains

Hitachi’s Class 800/801/802 trains are part of the AT-300 family of trains, with 26 metre long cars.

  • A five-car train is 130 metres long
  • A nine-car train is 234 metres long.

Current trains and ones the Hitachi trains are going to replace have the following lengths.

I think the Hitachi trains will fit platforms designed for these trains well.

Perhaps a five-car train might be a bit short for a eight-car BR standard 160 metre log train. But a six-car Hitachi train is 156 metres long.

Conclusion

Twenty-six metre long carriages seem to work well against BR’s historic standards based on a twenty-metre cars.

August 10, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment