The Anonymous Widower

Walking Down Renwick Road To Barking Riverside

This morning, I walked down Renwick Road to Barking Riverside.

This Google Map shows the area.

I started walking from Thames Road, turned South into Renwick Road and then walked to the bottom of the map.

  • On the West side of the road is a Nature Reserve and the massive Barking sub station, which is a major distribution point for East London’s electricity.
  • On the East side of the road  is Barking Riverside Campus, which is a large school catering for a wide age range.

It appears that the Barking Riverside Extension of the Gospel Oak to Barking Line, will run between the campus and Renwick Road, according to this map.

The location of Barking Riverside station is at the end of the branch line that comes South from the Barking to Tilbury Line.

I took these pictures as I walked.

There are certainly a lot of large electricity pylons over the area.

I will be taking this walk, several times in the next few years to see how it changes, as the station is built.

February 5, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

The Hundred Mile City

I heard about The Hundred Mile City on the BBC London News

It will never happen!

  • Can you imagine all London Boroughs agreeing to it?
  • Negotiation would be like Brexit squared.
  • Armies of Nimbys and the Council For The Fossilisation Of England would have a field day.
  • Linear cities were proposed for Londonn to Southampton and Ipswich to Felixstowe in the 1960s.

On the other hand, as a child, I had dreams of a circular railway through where I lived in Cockfosters, as getting to Central London was fast, but getting to my friends and relatives in Edgware and Enfield was slow.

Note that the plans involve a circular monorail. Monorails are not very common, except at theme parks. That is an idea from well into the last century.

Today, we would use tram-trains, as they are so much more functional and easily extended.

 

February 5, 2019 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , | 3 Comments

Building Under The Wires At Barking Riverside

I went to Barking Riverside yesterday, where they are building over 10,000 housing units and took these pictures where the EL1 buses from Barking station turn round.

As the pictures show, there are a lot of high voltage cables running over the site.

The East London Transit

The EL1, EL2 and EL3 buses  of the East London Transit connect the area to Barking station.

When I last came to this area, the buses weren’t to the high standard of New Routemasters.

February 5, 2019 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , | Leave a comment

Towers At Lewisham Station – 2nd February 2019

Lewisham station is becoming increasingly surrounded by tower blocks.

With the Bakerloo Line Extension planned to reach the new station around 2030, surely it is time to rebuild the station with more blocks over the tracks.

February 3, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Kidbrooke Village

Kidbrooke Village is a new housing estate next to Kidbrooke station. Previously, the site was occupied by the Ferrier Estate.

The estate has over five thousand units and several towers.

I think we’re going to see a lot more developments like this.

  • Good quality housing (Hopefully!)
  • Local employment.
  • Shops
  • Parkland

I think that a railway station with a frequent well-connected service is essential. Kidbroke has a train every ten minutes in both directions, with a choice of three London terminals.

Developers like a rail service, as it makes units easier to sell or rent and the amount of car parking can be reduced.

Hopefully Kidbrooke will be turned into a thriving community.

 

February 2, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Wake Up To Money – New Stations

I generally listen to this program on BBC Radio 5, before getting out of bed.

Today they asked for smaller ideas that would benefit, so I sent this message.

It costs around £10million to build a decent station on an existing railway line. We should be building tens of them to serve new developments and existing towns. Most new ones seem to be successful. James in Dalston

It was read out.

Various factors are also working in favour of new stations.

Successful New Stations

Success breeds success and there have been several examples of new station openings in the last decade, that have been very successful.

Other developments and existing towns want to have a similar success.

Innovative Design

Station design is getting better and more innovative, with features and modules cropping up all over the country.

Single-Platform Stations

Single-platform stations, like Cranbrook in Devon and Galashiels in the Borders, which both opened in recent years, have shown that single-platform stations are a more affordable alternative to an all-singing-and-dancing station with two platforms and an expensive step-free bridge.

New Trains With Fast Dwell Times

The new generation of trains like Aventras, Desiro Cities and Flirts are designed to slow from line speed, execute a station stop and get back to line speed, in a shorter time, than previous trains.

This has been achieved by.

  • Faster acceleration
  • Better braking
  • Level access between train and platform
  • Wide lobbies on trains
  • Better platform design
  • Walk-through trains
  • Better information on trains
  • Better staff organisation

Whereas a decade or two ago, an extra station stop would cause havoc with the timetable, it is now easier to add a stop at a new or existing station.

Developers Are Often In Favour

Developers seem to be moving away from a philosophy, that everybody using their office, commercial or housing development will come by car.

One developer told me, that you actually get a premium price if a housing development has its own train station.

Conclusion

I think that is very likely in the next few years, the number of new stations built will increase.

January 23, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | 2 Comments

The Combined Car Park And Storage Battery

I don’t drive these days, but I did for well over forty years.

If I was still driving now and still lived in Suffolk, I’d be looking seriously at an electric car as an everyday runabout, as rarely in the last twenty years, have I had the need to do a long journey, that I couldn’t do by train.

So my electric car would probably sit in a car park space at Cambridge North station, attached to a charger, a lot of the time. But with better batteries and vehicle-to-grid systems, there will come a time, when you will park your battery vehicle and tell it you’ll be returning in a few hours or days and you’ll need say four hours of charge on return. Obviously, if your circumstances change, you will have an app on your phone to make adjustments.

Suppose your average car had a 30 kWh battery, this would mean that the 450 space car park at Cambridge North station, if say 300 spaces were for electric cars would have a electricity storage capacity of around 0.9MWh.

So if the wind wasn’t blowing or the sun wasn’t shining, then there’s probably about half a MWh of electricity that can be borrowed and still allow drivers to get home.

It may all sound terribly complicated, but electricity put into batteries at night or other quiet times, gets used when it’s needed.

Batteries and other forms of energy storage will be everywhere; in houses, offices, public buildings, wind and solar farms, and in every electric vehicle.

There are 31.,6million cars alone in the UK and how many are quietly sitting in car parks and garages or at the side of the street, for most of the day.

The Car Park As A Power Station

There will be multi-story car-parks reserved for electric cars.

  • Each parking space will have a charging point.
  • The roof will of course have solar panels.
  • I would expect that in a few years time the connection between car and charger will be automatic.
  • The parking charge would be based on a mixture of time parked and energy passed to or from the battery.
  • Car parks would probably also be paid by National Grid dependent on how much energy they can make available automatically.

The control system for all this lot, would do my head in! But it would mean that all generated energy was either used or stored!

In some ways a car pack for electric cars would become a small power station.

Examples Of Car Parks

These car-parks would have some interesting applications.

Airports

Airports like Heathrow have a pollution problem and it’s not just the planes, but masses of diesel and petrol vehicles.

  • To encourage more passengers to drive electric vehicles to an airport, why not make the closest car parks electric car only?
  • Long-term car parks for electric vehicles could be a massive storage battery, which would be used to help power the airport.
  • Car parks for electric cars would be less polluted.
  • Car parks for electric cars could be under the ground with runways and taxiways on top.

Everyone would be a winner.

  • Passengers’ electric cars would be earning an energy storage charge from the National Grid.
  • The Airport would have a reliable back-up power source.
  • There would be much less pollution at the Airport.
  • National Grid would gain additional much-needed energy storage.

There will be a lot of thought going in to making airport parking more efficient and affordable for electric cars.

Business Parks And Offices

Much of the logic for airports would apply.

But I do feel, that companies with medium and large-sized fleets of vehicles will go electric, as they can then integrate energy management across their premises and fleet.

Town And City Centres

Towns and cities with a pollution problem like London, will surely use the best car parks as bribes to get more electric vehicles into the centre.

Residential Developments

The mind boggles at what could be done in residential developments.

  • Cars could go to and from parking automatically.
  • Every house would come with energy storage plus that in the car.
  • The development would appear car-free.
  • Cars could be in shared ownership with the development.
  • There could be automatic trolleys running through the development delivering parcels.

The market will determine what is needed.

Conclusion

Creating car parks solely for electric cars will create energy storage units at points of employment, living, shopping and transport.

January 6, 2019 Posted by | Transport, Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

London Overground Extension To Barking Riverside Gets Go Ahead

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on IanVisits.

This is an important extension, as it unlocks a valuable housing site at Barking Riverside, where 10,800 homes will be built.

A Cost Comparison

It is going to cost £263million, which works out at £24,000 for each house and flat.

By comparison, the billion pound Northern Line Extension to Battersea will serve around 50,000 houses, or £20,000 for each.

And the Lea Valley Rail Programme is a £170million project, that will serve 10,000 homes at Meridian Water with a new Meridian Water station. This is slightly cheaper at £17,000 per home, but a double-track railway was already in place.

Note that in all these schemes, the developers have made contributions. Some have been larger than others.

There are a surprisingly close set of figures for cost per home, considering that the developments will probably be at different points on the luxury spectrum.

So if we are building a large housing development in London, of say 10,000 homes, should we be prepared to spend around £200million on providing decent rail or some other fast and accessible public transport access?

At the smaller end, if say a developer is building five hundred new homes, this could mean it is worth spending up to ten million on updating an existing station. The new Lea Bridge station seems to have cost around this sum and seems to be supporting hundreds of homes.

Proposed Developments In London

So how does this figure fit in with proposed developments in London?

Brent Cross Cricklewood

Brent Cross Cricklewood is described like this in Wikipedia.

Brent Cross Cricklewood is a planned new town centre development in Hendon and Cricklewood, London, United Kingdom. The development is planned to cost around £4.5 billion to construct and will include 7,500 homes, 4,000,000 sq ft (370,000 m2) of offices, four parks, transport improvements and a 592,000 sq ft (55,000 m2) extension of Brent Cross Shopping Centre. The developers of the scheme are Hammerson and Standard Life.

Construction was planned to start in 2018 and be completed in 2021-22, but in March 2018 a delay was announced to January 2019.

It will be served by a new Brent Cross West station.

Wikipedia also says that £500million could be spent on transport developments, including new roads and rebuilding of stations

Kensal Green Gas Works

This site will be redeveloped with 3,500 homes, according to documents on the Internet.

It also sits beside the Great Western Main Line and Crossrail, but no station is currently planned.

But applying the the formula, should mean that on a site like this, £70million should be available for public transport developments.

Southall Gas Works

The Southall Gas Works site has planning permission for 3,750 homes.

The site is close to Southall station, which will be on Crossrail.

Plans exist to update Southall station, but the plans look very inadequate.

In my view this site would e ideal for a driverless shuttle that took residents and visitors too and from the station.

Sites Outside London

My knowledge of the country outside of London is not so good, but some new stations have been built to support new housing and other developments.

It certainly seems, that in the UK, we’re building stations and new lines to improve the accessibility of developments.

December 27, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 3 Comments

Tottenham Hale Station Becomes Clearer

I went to Tottenham Hale station this morning and took these two series of pictures.

These were of the station itself.

Note.

  1. The new step-free footbridge.
  2. The giant box of the new station under the scaffolding.
  3. The angular roof of the bus station.

These pictures show the construction site of a new tower on the other site of the tracks.

Note.

  1. A 32-storey tower is going on the site, so the foundations will be deep.
  2. The third track and the new platform 3 at Tottenham Hale station.
  3. The concrete structure between the tracks and the tower could be demolished.

This Google Map shows the area.

The new tower is going into the green space in the bottom-right of the map.

West Anglia Four-Tracking

It is an ambition of Newtwork Rail, Greater Anglia and Stansted Airport to have four tracks on the West Anglia Main Line.

It very much looks as if, the building of this tower will enable a fourth track to be threaded through alongside the third track being constructed at the present time for the new service between Stratford to Meridian Water stations.

I think though, that the bridge could be a bigger problem, as this picture shows.

Could it be considered a bridge on crutches?

But a well-designed replacement bridge would probably allow a fourth track to be laid underneath!

November 12, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 4 Comments

The City Of London Reaches For The Sky And Keeps More Feet On The Ground

This article on Construction News is entitled City of London To ‘Encourage’ New Skyscrapers.

This is the first two paragraphs.

The City of London Corporation has opened the door to a new wave of towers and an overhaul of one of its main routes as part of draft new local and transport plans.

The local authority wants to encourage the development of new towers able to provide an “iconic image of the City” that will enhance its global standing in the finance, professional services and commerce sectors.

The main route to be upgraded will be Bishopsgate between Liverpool Street station and London Bridge.

  • Pedestrians will have more priority.
  • Cycling and walking will be improved.
  • The public realm will be upgraded.

It the Peak hours, it could become one the busiest walking and cycling routes in the world.

  • At the Northern End, there is Liverpool Street station and Crossrail.
  • At the Southern End, there is London Bridge, London Bridge station, Southwark Cathedral and the River Thames.
  • Just to the West, is the massive Bank station complex.
  • Just to the East, is the soon-to-be-redeveloped Fenchurch Street station.

In addition, the road is fringed on either side with alleys, side streets and the impressive Leadenhall Market, many of which are full of restaurants, cafes, pubs and retail outlets.

Conclusion

In the article, Brexit wasn’t mentioned once, but a large increase in employment wasn’t.

Has the City of London, just put several handfuls of fingers up to the selfish plans of others?

 

 

November 6, 2018 Posted by | Business, Finance, World | , , | Leave a comment