The Anonymous Widower

The London Tube Map Gets A New Line

This picture shows the latest London tube map, which now shows the Thameslink network.

Note.

  1. There is a lot of new pink or red-and-white lines everywhere.
  2. The lines are numerous in the South-East corner of the map.
  3. Crossrail is not shown.

These pictures show areas in greater detail.

I am surprised that the whole of the Thameslink network has been added.

 

February 17, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , | 2 Comments

Thoughts On The Closure Of The Northern Line At Bank To Complete The Upgrade To Bank Station

The Bank Station Upgrade is a major project that will increase the capacity of Bank station by forty percent.

This document on the Transport for London web site gives details of the project.

It was originally planned that sometime in late 2021, the Northern Line will be closed through Bank station.

The document says this.

We will need to close part of the Northern line Bank branch in 2021, between Kennington and Moorgate, to connect new and existing sections of tunnel safely. Trains will run less frequently on those sections of the Bank branch that are still open. Check back here for details.

This would mean that Bank, London Bridge, Borough and Elephant & Castle stations will be closed on the Northern Line.

To help passengers, TfL say, they will do the following.

  • Run 33% more trains on the Northern line Charing Cross branch
  • Review bus use and consider enhancing services where necessary
  • Investigate scope for passengers to use alternative National Rail services, such as Waterloo to London Bridge, and London Bridge to Cannon Street
  • Review available walking space on the Moorgate to London Bridge pedestrian corridor.

These are my thoughts.

The New Cannon Street Entrance To Bank Station

This visualisation shows the new Cannon Street entrance to Bank station.

Note.

  1. South is to the right and we’re looking from roughly the North-West.
  2. The existing twin bores of the Northern Line on the far side of the visualisation.
  3. The escalator connection to the District and Circle Lines at Monument station Starts at the Southern end of these two narrow platforms.
  4. The new single bore of the new Southbound tunnel on the near side of the visualisation.
  5. The triple escalators descending from the new Cannon Street entrance to one of the four cross-walks between the Northern Line platforms.
  6. The current Eastern ends of these cross-walks are shown in The Southbound Northern Line Platform At Bank Station.

But where is the Docklands Light Railway (DLR)?

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows the lines at Bank station.

Note.

  1. The two existing Northern Line Platforms 3 and 4 are shown in black.
  2. The Central Line is shown in red.
  3. The DLR is shown in turquoise and sneaks under the Northern Line into Platforms 9 and 10.
  4. Platforms 7 and 8 are the platforms of the Waterloo and City Line.
  5. It would appear that the escalator connection between Bank and Monument stations goes between the existing tracks of the Northern Line.

So where is the Docklands Light Railway?

  • As Platforms 3 and 9 appear to be close together with Platform 9, the deeper of the two, I suspect we can’t see  the Docklands Light Railway in the visualisation, as it is hidden behind and underneath everything else.
  • I also suspect that the triple escalators between the new Northern Line cross-walks descend in the space at the Southern ends of Platforms 9 and 10.

This is the Northern end of the visualisation I showed earlier

Note.

  1. North is to the left.
  2. The two tracks and the narrow island platform of the current Northern Line on the far side of the visualisation.
  3. The two staircases leading up from Northern Line to a lobby, where passengers can walk North to the Central Line.
  4. The double escalator barrel going down to the DLR.
  5. The travelator that will connect the Northern and Central Lines
  6. The three cross passages linking the DLR escalators to the lobby between the Central and Northern Lines.
  7. The most Southerly of these cross passages has a lift to the DLR.

The new Southbound platform of the Northern Line, would appear to be to the West of the Docklands Light Railway.

It appears to be a very tight fit.

These pictures show the current status of the new entrance.

There would appear to be still a lot to be done.

This TfL image shows how it will look in 2022.

Ducking And Diving

No-one ducks and dives like Londoners. So rest assured, that if someone needs to get from A to B and the obvious route is blocked, Londoners will always get through. And if all else fails, a black cab will find a way, usually driven by a Londoner or someone infected with the ducking and diving virus.

Crossrail

As ever Crossrail is the herd of elephants in the London railway system.

The Northern Line is possibly the most important North-South route across Central London with two branches through the centre; Bank and Charing Cross.

But Crossrail connects to these  North-South routes.

  • Lea Valley Lines at Stratford
  • East London Line at Whitechapel
  • Lea Valley and West Anglia Lines at Stratford
  • Northern Line Bank Branch at Moorgate/Liverpool Street
  • Northern and City Line at Moorgate/Liverpool Street
  • Thameslink at Farringdon
  • Northern Line Charing Cross Branch at Tottenham Court Road
  • Jubilee Line at Bond Street
  • Bakerloo Line at Paddington

Crossrail will give a lot of opportunities for ducking and diving.

Under original plans Crossrail was supposed to open in 2019, with the Bank station closure for the upgrade in 2021.

This phasing certainly seemed a good idea at the time.

  • Crossrail will be able to offer alternative routes during the closure.
  • If the Crossrail stations are substantially complete, they can release workers to finish Bank station.

I wonder, if it would be sensible to not upgrade the tracks through Bank station until Crossrail opens through Moorgate/Liverpool Street.

As I wrote in Your First Crossrail Service May Arrive In Time For Christmas, Crossrail could open this year.

So are we being prepared for the mother of all cunning plans?

  • Crossrail between Paddington and Abbey Wood opens before Christmas.
  • The closure of the Bank branch to allow the Bank station upgrade happens at a convenient time after the opening of Crossrail through Moorgate/Liverpool Street.
  • Moorgate continues to have a limited Northern Line service to the North.
  • Crossrail continues work on the other branches.

Note.

  1. There is a crossover to the North of Moorgate station, which might allow Moorgate to work as a two-platform terminal station handling up to 4 or 6 trains per hour (tph).
  2. If Crossrail is running at Moorgate, the station should be step-free to and from the deep-level platforms.
  3. Transport for London are looking at walking routes on the Moorgate and London Bridge route.
  4. During the closure of the Northern Line through Bank, passengers for the City will go to Moorgate and walk or perhaps take a bus.

It is my view, that Crossrail must be open, before the Northern Line through Bank station is closed to allow work to be completed.

A Demonstration of the Northern Line Capacity At Moorgate When Working As A Terminal Station

Yesterday, which was a Sunday, the Northern Line was closed between Moorgate and London Bridge stations.

  • After a walk, I returned home from Moorgate station via Angel station, where I got a 38 bus.
  • I was surprised to find that trains on the Northern Line were leaving Moorgate station for the North every four to five minutes.

This would seem to indicate that frequencies of between 12 and 15 tph are possible.

Current frequencies through Bank station are 24 tph in the Peak and 20 tph in the Off Peak, so it will be a substantial reduction. But it is better, than my original estimate earlier in this section.

33% More Trains on the Northern Line Charing Cross Branch

Currently, the Charing Cross branch has a capacity of twenty-four tph and handles the following services in the Peak.

  • 10 tph between Edgware and Kennington
  • 2 tph between Edgware and Morden
  • 10 tph between High Barnet and Kennington
  • 2 tph between High Barnet and Morden

And these services in the Off Peak.

  • 10 tph between Edgware and Kennington
  • 10 tph between High Barnet and Kennington

Note.

  1. Extra trains go between the two Northern branches and Morden via the Bank branch.
  2. Kennington and Morden can handle 28 tph and regularly does.
  3. The loop at Kennington turns twenty trains per hour in both the Peak and the Off Peak

If there is an increase of 33 % in the number of trains, this must mean that 32 tph will run through Charing Cross in the Peak and 28 tph in the Off Peak.

  • The signalling system on the Northern Line is the same as that on the Jubilee Line, where it handles 30 tph.
  • It also can handle up to 30 tph between Kennington and Morden on the Northern Line.
  • Perhaps it can be stretched to 32 tph through Charing Cross in the Peak.

If the Charing Cross branch can only be uprated to 30 tph, that is still an increase of 25 % in the number of trains.

The Kennington Loop

I mentioned the Kennington Loop and this beautiful old drawing shows its layout.

Note.

  1. South is at the top of the drawing.
  2. At present, as I said, the loop turns twenty tph all day.
  3. The extension to Battersea connects to the loop.

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows a map of the loop.

Note.

  1. The Charing Cross branch goes to the North-West from Kennington.
  2. The Bank branch goes to the North-East from Kennington.
  3. ,The lines to Battersea are shown dotted.
  4. Trains using the extension to Battersea can only use the Charing Cross branch.

I don’t know, but I wouldn’t be surprised, if the line speed to and from Battersea, is faster than it is round the loop.

It’s just that the lines to Battersea are not such a sharp curve and they have been recently designed and built.

As the Modern branch can handle 30 tph, I wouldn’t be surprised to find that the Battersea extension has been designed to handle this frequency.

The Northern Line Extension To Battersea

This document on the Transport for London web site gives details of the Northern Line Extension To Battersea.

This paragraph introduces the project.

The Northern line extension (NLE) between Kennington and Battersea will help regenerate the Vauxhall, Nine Elms and Battersea areas by supporting new jobs and homes. The extension is scheduled to be completed in autumn 2021.

The opening of the extension could offer benefits to the existing Northern Line.

As I said in the previous section, twenty tph are turned at Kennington using the loop.

Will all these trains now use the new Battersea extension, when it opens?

  • The Battersea extension is fully double-track.
  • Battersea Power Station station has two platforms and a cross-over, so if Brixton and Walthamstow Central stations can handle in excess of 30 tph, I suspect London’s newest terminal station can too!

If the Battersea extension has a design capacity of 30 tph, it would certainly be able to handle 20 tph.

So I wouldn’t be surprised to see all trains that currently turn at Kennington will take the Battersea extension, when it opens.

There must surely be the interesting possibility of before the Battersea extension opens to passengers, using it to turn the trains that would otherwise use the loop at Kennington. It would certainly be a very thorough test, of track and signalling.

I am fairly certain, there would be advantages in having the Battersea extension open before the Bank branch is upgraded.

  • Running trains to Battersea could be more efficient than using the Kennington Loop.
  • Opening the Battersea extension would need the signalling at Kennington to be upgraded and fully tested, so any changes needed for increased frequencies on the Charing Cross branch could be performed at the same time.
  • All the residents of the new housing in Battersea. would have an Underground connection.

Opening the Battersea extension will change passenger patterns on the Northern Line and as the changes will be difficult to predict, it would surely be better to upgrade Bank station, after the opening of the Battersea extension.

Thameslink

Thameslink is not mentioned in any of the Transport for London documents, but surely it has a big part to play.

  • Thameslink serves a lot of stations in South and South East London and beyond, including Brighton, East Croydon, Orpington, Sevenoaks and Woolwich Arsenal.
  • Thameslink has an interchange with the Circle and District Lines at Blackfriars.
  • Thameslink has an interchange with the Metropolitan and Circle Lines at Farringdon.
  • Thameslink will have an interchange with Crossrail at Farringdon.
  • Blackfriars and City Thameslink stations have good walking routes along the River and to the City.

Thameslink should be appearing on the Tube Map any time soon.

Waterloo And City Line

I am missing the Drain, as it is the easiest way for people in the area, where I live to get to Waterloo station.

I just take a bus to Bank and then walk underground to London’s shortest Underground line.

According to this article on London SE1, it is closed because of the covids, but should reopen in April 2021.

Surely, Transport for London could reopen the line, if they vaccinated all the drivers.

As the Waterloo and City Line has an independent new entrance on Wallbrook, there should be no reason, why it couldn’t reopen before the Northern Line through bank is upgraded.

The Central Line At Bank Station

Nothing has been said, about whether the Central Line will be closed through Bank station, during the upgrade.

I don’t think it will be continuously closed, although access to some parts may be restricted.

There could be partial closures at weekends or in the evenings.

So for commuters and other must-travellers, I suspect the Central Line will get through.

The Circle And District Lines At Monument Station

My thoughts about the Circle and District Line would be similar to the Central Line.

But these lines with their connections at Westminster, Blackfriars, Cannon Street, Tower Hill and Whitechapel could prove important during the works.

The Docklands Light Railway At Bank Station

Again my thoughts about the Docklands Light Railway would be similar to the Central Line.

But there is a lot of work going on to improve access to the Docklands Light Railway, and this could result in a closure to allow completion.

Review Bus Use

When I come into London Bridge station, I usually go to the bus station and get a bus, which stops within fifty metres of my front door. Going to London Bridge isn’t as convenient and I take a variety of routes.

But the corridor between London Bridge and Old Street via Bank and Moorgate has three bus routes; 21, 43 and 141, the last two of which terminate in the bus station at London Bridge. I suspect that the frequency of the last two buses could be increased, if they had a few more buses and drivers, and turned them faster at London Bridge.

I also feel there is scope to run a shuttle between Finsbury Square and London Bridge station.

  • It would loop round Finsbury Square at the Northern end.
  • It would loop through London Bridge station, as the 43 and 141 buses currently do.
  • They would serve Moorgate and Bank.
  • As it will be running through a busy part of the City with lots of pedestrians, these buses should be either battery or hydrogen.
  • But as they should be high-capacity double-deckers, battery probably wouldn’t have enough power.

What better way would there be, to showcase London’s new hydrogen buses?

And I’m sure Jo Bamford, would make sure that London had enough new Wrightbus hydrogen buses  to provide the service.

National Rail Between Charing Cross/Waterloo And London Bridge

I am probably not alone in using this route in preference to the Jubilee Line to travel between Westminster and London Bridge, as where there is an alternative to the deep-level Underground, I will often use it.

In my case coming home from Waterloo, I’ll often hop to London Bridge on National Rail and then get a 141 bus home.

This is classic ducking and diving on my part.

I’m sure others will do the same during the Bank branch closure.

I would also hope, that season tickets would allow passengers to swap terminals without too much trouble and any expense.

National Rail Between Cannon Street And London Bridge

Using Cannon Street instead of London Bridge could be an relatively easy alternative for many passengers.

  • It connects to the Circle and District Lines.
  • There are East-West buses outside the station.

This Google Map shows the location of the station.

There are a number of useful walking routes from the station, which is towards the bottom of the image slightly towards the right.

  • Bank station is about 300 metres and six minutes away.
  • The North-South buses between Moorgate and London Bridge on King William Street are 200 metres and three minutes away.
  • St. Paul’s is a bit further but it does have the Central Line and lots of buses including the 76 to Moorgate and Old Street stations.

At seventy-three, I can still walk between Cannon Street and Moorgate stations in 15 minutes.

Walking Between London Bridge and Moorgate

Transport for London have said they will review this,

It is not a difficult walk and it has improved since traffic was reduced at Bank.

Conclusion

As originally planned, the timings of the various projects were such that these projects would be more of less completed before the upgrade of the tracks at Bank station was to be performed.

  • Crossrail
  • The Northern Line Extension to Battersea.
  • The new Wallbrook entrance to Bank station.

But no-one had foreseen Covid-19.

So I would plan the date of the Northern Line closure with the utmost care.

February 8, 2021 Posted by | Health, Transport | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

The Southbound Northern Line Platform At Bank Station

These pictures show the Southbound platform of the Northern Line at Bank station.

Can there be a Metro, U-bahn, Underground or subway platform anywhere with such bad design and worse decor?

  • There are no tiles or cladding on the walls.
  • You can see all the cast iron linings dating from the nineteenth century.
  • How do people get across the tracks to the passages in the wall?
  • But above all there are no adverts.

The state of this tunnel only tells a one-sided story.

Some metres to the West of the existing tunnel a new larger Southbound tunnel has been dug.

This map from Transport for London, shows the route of the new tunnell.

Note.

  1. The continuous black line of the existing Northbound line.
  2. The dotted black line of the new Southbound line.

This sentence from this article on IanVisits, which is entitled Bank Tube Station Upgrade Reaches Tunnelling Milestone, explains how the new tunnels were built.

Part of the tunnelling work saw the project team cut through deep-level piled foundations of one building, which required careful excavation and the installation of a new load-support system to support the existing foundations while still allowing a tunnel to pass through them.

According to Ian, 1300 metres of new tunnels have been constructed. All have been dug by fairly traditional methods, uding men, shovels and small diggers and other machines.

The space between the two running tunnels will become a wide concourse. This picture taken at Angel station, shows a wide platform that could be delivered at Bank station.

The old Southbound tunnel will be filled in to form the concourse. Those curious doors will become through passages to the escalators, lifts and the other platform.

 

February 4, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 4 Comments

Whitechapel Station – 29th December 2020

I took these pictures as I passed through Whitechapel station.

Note.

  1. The platforms for the Metropolitan and District Lines seem to be almost complete.
  2. New lighting and seating has been installed.

The stairs down to the platforms from the street, can be seen behind one of the hoardings.

January 19, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

Northern Line Extension ‘On Track’ For 2021 Opening

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Transport Network.

I’m looking forward to using the line in the Autumn.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout of the extension.

 

Note.

  1. The extension starts from the existing Kennington Loop at Kenning station.
  2. There is an intermediate station at Nine Elms.
  3. As with many two-platform stations, there is a cross-over in the approach. It is shown in a picture in the article.

Hopefully, the extension will eventually be extended to Clapham Junction.

Step-Free Interchange At Kennington Station

I have been worried about this and from the comment of others like Melvyn, I am not alone.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout at Kennington station.

Note.

  1. Elephant and Castle station is at the North-East corner of the map and is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line.
  2. The pair of tracks going North-West are the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line.
  3. The pair of tracks going South-West are the Morden branch of the Northern Line.
  4. Trains going South  to Morden can use either Platform 2 or 4, depending, whether they have come Charing Cross or Bank.
  5. Trains going North  from Morden can use either Platform 1 or 3, depending, whether they are going to Charing Cross or Bank.
  6. The Kennington Loop allows trains from Charing Cross that arrive in Platform 2 to go direct to Platform 1 to return to the North.
  7. There appears to be a revering siding, which can also reverse trains from either Platform 2 or 4 and send them North from Platform 1 or 3.
  8. Chords South of the platforms allow trains to and from Charing Cross to access the tracks to Morder and the reversing siding.
  9. The Battersea Power Station branch, is shown in dotted lines and connects to the Kennington Loop.

I took these pictures at Kennington station today.

Note.

The platforms are in two pairs, which are connected by walk-through passages, with Platforms 2 and 4  for Southbound trains and Platforms 1 and 3 for Northbound trains.

  1. Each platform has a proper clock.
  2. The only access to the pair of platforms is by steep long stairs.
  3. The stairs need to be rebuilt with proper handrails on both sides.
  4. The last picture shows the handrails at Moorgate station.

Currently, the system allows journeys between the North and Morden, either directly or with a walk-across change at Kennington station.

  • Going South to Morden, if you get a train, that reverses at Kennington, you would wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 2 or 4, that is going the whole way.
  • Going North from Morden, if you get a train going to the wrong Northern destination, you would get off at Kennington and wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 1 or 3, that is going to the destination you desire.

What is needed on all platforms, is more comprehensive information displays.

  • Displays on Platforms 2 and 4, would show details of all Southbound trains. whether they terminated at Kennington or went to Morden, or in future went to Battersea Power Station station.
  • Displays on Platforms 1 and 3, would show details of all Northbound trains.

Displays would indicate destination and time as now, but with the addition of platform, where you catch the train.

If there is one problem it is taking a train between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

This public domain drawing from the Internet shows the station, after the Kennington Loop had been built in the 1920s and 1930s.

Note.

  1. We are looking from the North.
  2. The Kennington Loop at the far end of the station.
  3. The four platforms of the station numbered 2, 4, 3 and 1 from left to right.
  4. The stairs between the two pairs of platforms, leading to overbridges.
  5. The lift tower and a spiral staircase leading to and from the surface.

I can now sum up the step-free status of the station.

  • Passengers entering or leaving the station, must walk up or down a staircase like that shown in the first picture.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the same direction, just walk across to the other platform in the pair.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the opposite direction, as they would going between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations, will need to climb one set of stairs and descend another.

It does appear that in an ideal world lifts will need to be added.

Thoughts On Future Step-Free Access At Kennington Station

In the future, it is planned that the Northern Line will be split into two lines.

  • Battersea Power Station and Edgware
  • Modern and High Barnet

Will this increase the number of passengers, who need to do the opposite direction change, as there will just be more trains running on all branches?

Alternative Step-Free Access

But, there may be another way to go between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

  • Take a train from Battersea Power Station to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take a train from Waterloo back to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 2 at Kennington to Platform 4.
  • Take the first train from Platform 4 to Morden.

The reverse journey between Morden and Battersea Power Station stations would be.

  • Take a train from Morden to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 3 at Kennington to Platform 1
  • Take a train from Platform 1 to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take the first train from Waterloo to Battersea Power Station.

Note,

  1. Both routes have two changes; one at Kennington and one at Waterloo,
  2. All changes are step-free.
  3. All changes are very simple

It should also be noted that Battersea Power Station, Nine Elms and Waterloo are all or will be fully step-free stations.

The two routes I have outlined have one big advantage. They already exist and the only costs would be training of staff and indicating the routes to passengers.

January 6, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Thameslink Is Back On The London Tube Map

The title of this post, is the same as that, of this this article on Ian Visits.

Thameslink last appeared on the tub map in 1999.

I’m glad it’s back.

I regularly use Thameslink as a quick route across London, especially, if I  want to go to Tate Modern, as the gallery is a short walk from Blackfriars station.

December 17, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 1 Comment

Coronavirus: Can I Be Infected By Touching Surfaces?

The title of this post is the same as that of an article on The Sunday Times.

The article is worth reading.

These two paragraphs some up the latest thoughts on infection from surfaces.

Monica Gandhi, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, told the US science website Nautilus that there had been “a lot of fear” at the beginning of the pandemic about transmission of the virus if people touched their faces after contact with metal, plastic or other contaminated surfaces, collectively known to scientists as fomites.

Yet the evidence suggests that the virus on most surfaces is not strong enough to make people ill. “It’s not through surfaces,” she added. “It’s from being close to someone spewing virus from their nose and mouth, without in most cases knowing they are doing so.”

I travel around the Underground a lot and I’m always masked, when I enter stations and usually use the hand-sanitisers, at least once on a trip. Most in London, seem to be acting similarly.

There has been no scares about using the Underground because of high-rates of the covids in recent months, that I can find.

More importantly, under a sub-title of Why Are Young Women The Targets Now?, this is the first paragraph.

The disease that ravaged care homes and turned the elderly into hermits for much of the spring has taken aim at different targets this autumn. Public Health England’s most recent statistics show that the 20-29 age group has had the most new cases since the end of June, followed closely by the 30-39 age group. In both those groups, more women are being infected than men.

This is paragraph is from the NHS web site.

Reported cases of coeliac disease are around 3 times higher in women than men. It can develop at any age, although symptoms are most likely to develop: during early childhood – between 8 and 12 months old, although it may take several years before a correct diagnosis is made.

Could this paragraph partly explain, the fact that women in their twenties and thirties are suffering from the covids?

Coeliac disease affects one in fifty of the population.

As a coeliac, it’s no hard task to stick to a gluten-free diet.

And I get the bonus of being 25 % less likely to suffer from cancer, according to peer-reviewed research from Nottingham University.

October 4, 2020 Posted by | Health | , , | Leave a comment

Tory London Mayoral Candidate Wants Sponsorship Deals For Tube Station Names To Raise TfL Cash

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Telegraph.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Underground stations could be renamed under plans put forward by the Conservative London mayoral candidate for a £100 million a year sponsorship deal to bolster investment in the capital’s public transport network.

I think it could be an idea worth pursuing, as due to Sadiq Khan’s bribe of a fare freeze to get elected Transport for London’s finances are in a terrible state.

The article says, that Dubai, Madrid and New York already use similar ideas to raise money.

Remember, London already has one station, where name was changed for a local business; Gillespie Road station was renamed Arsenal in 1932.

Let’s Be Creative!

I also think, if we are creative, we could make the stations much more passenger-friendly, with respect to services nearby.

Imagine a board, with Alight Here For at the top and slots for local shops and businesses below. Each slotted-in advert would be a perhaps a foot wide and four inches high, saying something like. “Boots 100 metres” or “Costa Here!”

September 20, 2020 Posted by | Business, Transport | , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Go-ahead For West London 460-home Build To Rent Scheme

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Construction Enquirer.

This is the first paragraph.

The scheme is the first to be brought forward by Connected Living London, a partnership between build to rent specialist Grainger and Transport for London.

This must be the way for London to get best value from all the suitable sites for housing, owned by Transport for London.

Four sites are mentioned in the article.

  • Next to Southall station
  • Next to Arnos Grove station
  • Montford Place in Kennington. which is currently being used as a construction site for the Northern Line Extension.
  • Above the new Nine Elms station on the Northern Line Extension.

These are some thoughts on the sites.

Arnos Grove Station

The developers will have to be careful, with the design at Arnos Grove station, as it’s a Grade II* Listed building.

This Google Map shows the station.

I never knew, that the station had so much parking.

Will the development be over some or all of this car parking?

This article on Ian Visits is entitled Plans To Build Flats On Arnos Grove Tube Station Car Park.

Ian says that there will be four blocks, with a total of162 rental homes, of which 40 % will be affordable.

  • It doesn’t seem to be high density or high towers.
  • A map shows it is not over the railway.

Ian also says this about the loss of car parking.

Unsurprisingly, there are local objections to the plans to remove the car park with nearly 300 parking spaces, although TfL counters that a third of the people who currently drive to the station living within walking distance.

But then many people never drive very far from where they live. For environmental reasons, perhaps fossil fuel vehicles should pay a Movement Tax of say five pounds, every time the vehicle is moved in a built-up area. Zero-emission vehicles would be exempt!

Montford Place

I took these pictures of the Montford Place site in July.

This site could be sensitive too! But surely, the residents don’t want an ugly utilitarian headhouse for the ventilation shaft of the Northern Line Extension.

This Google Map shows the site.

It is not small, judging by the two buses at the side.

There’s also a large hole to cover!

 

 

September 19, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Transport for London Are Driving Me Mad

Because of COVID-19, a lot of Underground station entrance and exits have been closed.

I can understand, why it needs to be done, but I keep falling foul of their closures.

  • I wanted to go from the Angel to Paddington and my usual route is to change between Northern and Circle Lines at Kings Cross. But you had to walk all the way round Kings Cross station for the change.
  • Coming back from Paddington, I often take the Bakerloo Line to Regents Park station, but the train went straight through.
  • I wanted to go from Wlathamstow Central to Dalston. Normally, I would use the Overground and a bus, changing at Hackney Downs. But the Overground wasn’t working, so I used the alternative route changing at Seven Sisters and I got another long walk.

What is needed is better information at all station entrances, as once you’re in the labyrinth it’s too late.

June 15, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , , | 2 Comments