The Anonymous Widower

Stairs And A Lift At Cannon Street Station

These pictures show stairs and a lift at Cannon Street station, that provide access between the National Rail and Underground stations.

In my view this is one of the best installations, that I’ve seen.

  • There is a lift for those who need one.
  • The stairs are wide with an additional central hand-rail.
  • The hand-rails are double and covered in comfy blue plastic.

This may be impressive, but as yet, there is only a full step-free connection to the Eastbound platform.Underground.

Obviously, all railway stations should be step-free, but to do all stations in the UK in a short time would be expensive and probably disruptive too!

But one thing that can be done at many stations, is to improve the hand-rails.

One of the worst stations near me, is Dalston Kingsland station, which was rebuilt a few years ago with a narrow staircase to each platform.

There has already been an incident at the busy station, where four people were hurt, as reported in this article on City AM.

Were the narrow stairs partly to blame?

December 9, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 2 Comments

New Lifts At Newbury Park Station

Newbury Park station now has lifts.

It also looks like the station has had a bit of upsprucing, as well!

The two clocks looked superb, alongside what is a top quality lift installation.

Two mothers with babies in prams were especially pleased, as neither knew that the station now had lifts, as they didn’t live in the area.

Transport for London are putting in several step-free installations at the outer reaches of the Central Line and like a thousand American lawyers at the bottom of the sea, it’s a good start!

December 8, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Bank Station Walbrook Entrance Opened Today

I was there at ten o’clock this morning to see the new Walbrook Entrance to Bank station open.

There are various features of the design that are excellent.

  • It looks like the entrance has been designed to be able to handle the full capacity of the uprated Waterloo & City Line, running higher capacity new trains with a higher capacity and possibly a higher frequency.
  • The stairs are wide and built to a standard, that will tempt  fit people to use them at busy times.
  • They will also be very safe in emergencies.
  • The route from the pedestrianised Walbrook to the gateline is clear and level, so it should handle very large numbers of passengers in safety.

It should be noted that those I spoke to, liked the entrance.

Conclusion

London and other cities need more entrances to subways and underground railways like this.

It must be one of the best in London, ranking alongside these stations on the Jubilee Line.

  • Canary Wharf
  • Canada Water
  • North Greenwich
  • Westminster

And the new entrances at Bond Street, Kings Cross St. Pancras and Victoria.

 

November 30, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 4 Comments

Crossrail – Northern – Northern City Interchange At Moorgate Station

In New Bank Tube Station Entrance In Final Stages Ahead Of Opening, Mrlvyn said this in a comment.

I visited Moorgate Station recently and noticed the new lift of the Northern Line behind the hoarding. I then used escalator to go up to the Northern City Line which is directly above the Northern Line but there is no sign of work for the lift to stop at this level !

I have discovered from another site that Line will not be going step free due to arguments between DFT and TFL when Boris Johnson was Mayor and who should fund a hole in the wall for lift to stop!

Plus ca change! My company provided the planning computer and software for the Jubilee Line Extension. We heard stories of bad planning all the time and it certainly wasn’t a happy project.

But look at this image, I’ve clipped from this large visualisation of the massive Liverpool Street-Moorgate Crossrail Station.

The image shows the Northern City Line coming into Moorgate station.

Colours are as follows.

  • Blue – Northern City Line
  • Yellow – Circle and Hammersmith & City Lines
  • Black – Northern
  • Turquoise – Crossrail

Details to note.

Existing Northern City Escalators

The escalator shaft to the existing ticket hall is shown in white by the letter M of Moorgate.

Existing Northern Line Escalators

The double tunnels from the stairs leading to the platforms to the escalators are shown in white underneath the Northern City Line.

The escalators to the existing ticket hall are clearly shown.

Circle And Hammersmith & City Lines

When Crossrail opens, passengers would seem to still do, as they do now to interchange between Norther/Northern City and the Sub-Surface Lines.

The only problem now, is if you need a lift, there is none to the deep lines or in the subway under the Sub-Surface Lines.

I am sure that the Crossrail reconstruction will address these problems.

The New Crossrail Station

The big turquoise block is the new Crossrail station and Ticket Hall.

This image shows a cross-section through it.

It will be two escalators down from street level to Crossrail. But then rhen Crossrail is deep.

A New Tunnel

In the visualisation, there is a new tunnel from around the centre of the Northern and Northern City Lines to the new Crossrail station.

I am not sure of where it joins the new construction over Crossrail, but assuming that the visualisation is to scale, the tunnel is larger than a typical Underground tunnel.

This size will mean that it will attract a lot of passengers.

At the Crossrail end, if would probably connect by a level route to an interchange floor, where the following would be possible.

  • Take an escalator or lift to and from Crossrail.
  • Take a level connection to the Westbound platforms of the Sub-Surface Lines.
  • Take an escalator or lift to street level.

I suspect that would handle all connections except for step-free access to the Eastbound Sub-Surface Lines.

At the other end of this tunnel, it would need to have large capacity and step-free access to the Northern and Northern City Lines.

Conclusion

It looks like the Northern and Northern City Lines are being given a second route to both the surface and other lines through Moorgate.

I shall go and have a look this morning.

I took these pictures.

A few observations.

  • The two escalators connecting the Northern and the Northern City Lines  are in good condition with refurbished walls and tiling.
  • There are no tell-tale blue walls on the platforms for the Northern City Line, which still retains its Network South East livery.
  • There are two blue walls on the opposite side of the cross passages to both escalators on the Northern Line platforms
  • The blue wall, facing the up connecting escalator is wider than that facing the down escalator.
  • There doesn’t seem to be any works for a lift to take passengers to and from the existing tickey hall.

It looks like it will be a tight squeeze fitting in all the access stairs, escalators and lifts between the Northern Line platforms and the new tunnel, that is shown connecting the Northern Line platforms to Crossrail.

I come to one or more of these conclusions.

  • There will be other passages dug in the future.
  • Passengers will continue to use the existing escalators.
  • I’m missing something obvious.

As Moorgate station is one of the busiest and will get even more so, there must be a sensible plan.

The only thing I can find on the internet is this page on the Acanthus Architects web site.

 

 

 

November 28, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Train-Platform Interface In London

I feel very strongly, that the floor of a train should be level with the platform, when you board a train.

This is mainly, because after my stroke, some said, that I could spent a lot of my life in a wheelchair. Luckily, the doomsters were wrong, but I do feel for those who have to use one or regularly push a buiggy on London’s extensive transport system.

So in this post, I shall be collecting examples of the good, the bad and the ugly.

I have put a note by some of the pictures, which are as follows.

  1. Only one type of train calls at this platform and as the platform is straight, it could be better.
  2. This platform was built or rebuilt, when new trains started on a new line.
  3. Taken on a Harrington Hump

These are just the start.

 

 

November 23, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 1 Comment

Merseyrail Reveals Latest Station Closures For Upgrade Work Ahead Of New Trains

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Liverpool Business News.

This is the first paragraph.

Merseyrail has announced details of the next phases of station closures as it upgrades is platforms to make them ready its new £460m fleet of trains due to come into service in 2021.

In total, there are eleven phases of work to give all platforms level access to the new trains.

I am fairly sure that no other local rail network in the UK, will have this quality of level access.

Some stations on the London Overground have similar access, but not that many. When you consider, that many station platforms have been rebuilt and they are only used by Class 378 trains, I believe an opportunity was missed.

The article says this about Merseyrail‘s new Class 777 trains.

Swiss manufacturer Stadler has started the manufacturing process at its Szolnok plant in Hungary on the new fleet of 52 trains. There, the car-body production is under way with the units being machined, welded, sandblasted and coated in special protection and premium quality paint to combat corrosion, caused by the contact with sea-water.

Most of the current Class 507/508 trains are forty years old, but they appear to me to be one of the most bottom-friendly suburban trains in the UK, with desirable 2+2 seating. I regularly travel on Class 313 trains, which are similar trains of the same vintage, into and out of Moorgate, and these are scrapyard specials compared to Merseyrail’s spotless, spacious and comfortable trains.

These pictures from March 2017, show the current trains.

They certainly look to be in good enough condition to see all the new trains into service and through their inevitable teething troubles in the next couple of years.

Conclusion

,The care being taken by Merseyrail and Stadler in the preparation for and design of their new trains, seems to indicate that they are intending to get forty years out of the new fleet.

 

November 20, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Truly Dreadful Platform-Train Access At Lewisham Station

These pictures show the truly dreadful platform-train access at Lewisham station.

I should say there is even worse access at the front of platform 2.

 

I should say that Lewisham station has lifts, which are welcome. But it seems to me that if you’re putting in lifts, you should probably fix the station, so that someone in a wheelchair, should be able to wheel themselves on and off the train.

It’s all down to the long, curved platforms.

Surely, if they rebuild this station for the Bakerloo Line Extension, then these platforms will be consigned to the dustbin of history.

October 9, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , | 2 Comments

A Swiss-Style Wheelchair Ramp

I took this picture of a wheelchair ramp at Interlaken Ost station

At least I noticed several low-floor trains with gap fillers.

I think most of these pictures were taken of trains built by Swiss train manufacturer; Stadler.

I think that this is the way to go.

Stadler are using gap fillers on their Class 777 trains for Merseyrail. This is said in Wikipedia about the design of the trains.

The trains will also have platform gap fillers so wheelchair users will not have to use ramps to board the train.

Will there be step-free access on Greater Anglia’s Class 745 and Class 755 trains?

It’s obviously good for passengers, but what’s in it for train operators?

It’s all about making the dwell time in a station as short as possible.

September 16, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 1 Comment

How Removing Level Crossings Can Get Complicated And Expensive

This article in the East Anglian Daily Times is entitled Multi-Million Pound Lift Could Boost Rail Link From Sudbury To Colchester.

Greater Anglia intend to improve the service on the Gainsborough Line by running direct services between Sudbury and Colchester Town stations.

One of the reasons for doing this, is that the increasing number of passengers travelling between Sudbury and Colchester will avoid changing trains at Marks Tey station.

This Google Map shows Marks Tey station.

Note.

  • The two platforms on the Great Eastern Main Line.
  • The single platform for the Gainsborough Line.
  • The footbridge over the main line.

As can be seen, the only step-free interchange with the Gainsborough Line is to and from trains going North to Colchester and Ipswich.

These pictures show the frootbridge and the Gainsborough Line platform.

It is not an ideal interchange for passengers other than the unencumbered, fit and healthy.

I suspect some passengers from Sudbury to London might even take a train to Colchester first and then use the lifts to change to a London train.

And then there’s the Car Parking!

Note in the Google Map, that the station has two car parks, one on each side of the line. So most using the car parks will have to cross the line on the footbridge.

Also note, that the car park on the Northern side of the station, is connected to the station using a pedestrian crossing over the single track rail line, that connects the Gainsborough Line to the Great Eastern Main Line.

According to the East Anglian article, this rail line is used twice a day. But when the Sudbury to Colchester Town service starts, it will be used twice an hour. Anf if this service is successful, I can see Greater Anglia wanting to run the service with a frequency of two trains per hour (tph), which would mean four tph going over the pedestrian crossing.

Understandably, Network Rail want to remove the pedestrian crossing.

This is a paragraph from the East Anglian article.

The national fund has £300m available – and Mr Burles said he estimated that the cost of the work at Marks Tey would be between £4m and £5m. It is at the top of Greater Anglia’s “wish list,” but political support would be necessary if the money was to be released.

As to the political support, the Gainsborough Line and Marks Tey are in a total of five constituencies; all of which are Conservative.

I suspect, Chris Grayling could be under severe pressure from this one.

Although you have to remember that to many civil servants in the Department of Transport, Suffolk is just an area, you pass through on the way to your weekend cottage in Norfolk.

 

 

August 16, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Northumberland Park Station – June 12th 2018

The new Northumberland Park station is coming on and has allowed the temporary footbridge to go somewhere else!

The level crossing will not be reinstated and I was wondering how pedestrians and others will cross the railway. There is still an old bridge on the other side to the station, but it doesn’t look to be in the best condition.

I then saw the two staircases in the new station.

So will there be two separate routes across the railway in one bridge?

This image from Network Rail, shows the station from the Eastern side.

There appears to be the following.

  • Two bridge sections, with the one on the far side connected to the low station buildings.
  • Two sets of stairs and a lift giving access from the bridge to the current Platform 1 and new platform behind it, that will become an island platform.
  • Two tracks this side of the island platform.
  • With the two tracks on the other side of the island platform, this means the station will be ready for four-tracking of the West Anglia Main Line.
  • A set of steps leading down from the near rend of the footbridge, this side of the extra tracks.

I have wondered for some time, when the West Anglia main Line is four-tracked and/or Crossrail 2 is built, which pair of tracks will be the fast lines.

In the interim it is obvious, that the third rack, which will run between  Meridian Water and Lea #bridge stations, will run on the near side of the island platform.

My only question is will it only handle trains towards Stratford or will the line be bi-directional?

But when the line is fully four-tracked, I think that the lines from West to East will be as follows.

  • Northbound Slow (Current Platform 2) – Local trains and Crossrail 2
  • Southbound Slow (Current Platform 1) – Local trains and Crossrail 2
  • Northbound Fast – Stansted and Cambridge services
  • Southbound Fast – Stansted and Cambridge services

I have put the slow lines on the West, as these are the platforms with the best access and few if any, fast services will stop in the station.

Crossrail 2 could of course change everything.

But I suspect that Northumberland Park station is being rebuilt, so that it will work with the most likely arrangement of tracks.

June 12, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , | 2 Comments