The Anonymous Widower

Covid: Biden Vows 100m Vaccinations For US In First 100 Days

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

These are the introductory paragraphs of the article.

US President-elect Joe Biden has set a goal of 100 million Covid vaccinations in his first 100 days in office.

He said his first months in office would not end the outbreak and gave few details on a rollout plan but he said he would change the course of Covid-19.

Introducing his health team for when he takes office on 20 January, he urged Americans to “mask up for 100 days”.

I can see a few rocks ahead in his plan.

Vaccine Production

According to media reports, the number of vaccinations has declined since Friday because of delivery issues with the Pfizer vaccine.

In Tracking COVID-19 Vaccination Statistics, the number of vaccinations in the last few days are as follows.

  • 15th January – 324233
  • 16th January – 549920
  • 17th January – 205235
  • 18th January – 204076

The figures have been declining because of these delivery issues.

Pfizer say they are updating the factory in Belgium to increase production.

I don’t believe that, as the United States will be needing a million does per day, that they can get enough production on a reliable basis.

A Federal Lockdown

I believe that to get the virus under control in the United States, the country must follow the route of countries like France, Germany, Japan, South Korea and the UK and have a period of perhaps a hundred days of total lockdown.

But I doubt that would be possible in the United States.

Mask Wearing

I don’t believe that Americans will mask up for a hundred days.

The Anti-Vaxxers And The Trumpeteers

I can see them having a field day!

Especially, if Joe Biden adds some strong legislation to curb the spread of the virus. Which in my view is needed.

Conclusion

It’s going to get a lot messier and probably more dangerous in the United States in the next few months.

January 20, 2021 Posted by | Health | , , , , | 2 Comments

Tips For American Servicemen In Britain During The Second World War

The title of this post, is the same as this page on the Imperial War Museum web site.

These are the first two introductory paragraphs.

In 1942, the first of over 1.5 million American servicemen arrived on British shores in preparation for the Allied offensives against Germany during the Second World War.

That year, the United States’ War Department published Instructions for American Servicemen in Britain to help soldiers, sailors and airmen – many of whom had never travelled abroad before – adjust to life in a new country.

The whole area of the web site is well-worth exploring.

The book, which is entitled Instructions For American Servicemen In Britain 1942 can be purchased from the museum.

January 16, 2021 Posted by | World | , , , | 3 Comments

New Form Of Solar Energy To Enter US Market

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on abc News.

This is the first few paragraphs.

Organic energy is getting a jolt with the launch of GO-OPV’s ORENgE system in North America.

Organic energy uses a thin film panel to capture the sun’s rays and converts it to power, similar to traditional solar power.

The panels could be used for windows or trucks, phone or computer chargers, or it can be a building-integrated photovoltaics in glass.

This sounds good to me!

My South-facing windows make air-conditioning a must in my house.

But my air-conditioning broke in 2018 and no-one has been able to fix it!

This technology would sort it out in a trice!

Conclusion

This is technology to watch.

December 20, 2020 Posted by | Energy | , , , | 1 Comment

Will The United States Be The Largest Battery In The World?

This article on Renewables Now is entitled Swell Bags Funds For 200 MWh Of Distributed Energy Storage In VPPs.

This is the introductory paragraph.

US distributed energy and grid solutions provider Swell Energy Inc has secured financial backing for up to USD 450 million (EUR 370.6m) worth of virtual power plants (VPPs) to be deployed across the country.

200 MWh a lot of energy storage and it works out at around $450,000 per MWh.

But it was the last paragraph that caught my eye.

Swell expects distributed energy systems in its portfolio to generate more than 3,000 GW over the next 20 years and customers to potentially store 1,000 GWh for later use.

If that should be 3,000 GWh, that will be 150 GWh per year. By comparison Drax, which is the largest power station in the UK, can generate 34,689.6 GWh in a year.

Drax may be 230 times bigger in GWh per year, but the US numbers are impressive and as wind and solar develop in the country, I suspect the United States will become the largest battery in the world.

Watch the US renewable energy sector grow!

December 15, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , | 1 Comment

Liquid Hydrogen Tested As An Auto Fuel

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the Lethbridge Herald.

I find it strange that I have only picked up this story from a local newspaper in Alberta.

Lethbridge is a city, with a population of a bit over 100,000. It doesn’t seem to have much to do with Alberta’s oil industry, which might see hydrogen as a threat.

This is the introductory paragraph.

A recent demonstration project was evaluated for a hydrogen-fuelled vehicle by the U.S. Department of Energy Division. This demonstration will be applicable to other means of transportation such as trucks and trains.

This paragraph describes the conversion.

They used a 1979 Buick Century four-door sedan with 3.8-litre displacement, turbocharged V-6 engine. This vehicle provided a good compromise on trunk space for installation of the DFVLR tank, passenger accessibility for demonstration, engine compartment space for versatility in selection of substitute engines, available engine sizes, efficiency and suitability for modification of hydrogen operation.

I am left with the impression, after reading the article, that it might be possible for large American style cars to be converted to hydrogen.

 

November 7, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Siemens and Macquarie Form Calibrant Energy To Tackle Distributed Energy Market

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Greentech Media.

This is the introductory paragraphs.

Macquarie Capital and Siemens have formed a joint venture to finance and build distributed energy projects, joining an increasingly competitive landscape in the growing corporate renewables market, the two announced this week.

The partnership, called Calibrant Energy, will initially focus its energy-as-a-service model in the United States, where corporate and industrial customers have become heavyweight renewables buyers as they seek to reach decarbonization goals.

It looks a good idea for a business venture.

I also like it, that two big corporate beats have got together tp finance and install renewable energy systems like solar.

October 7, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Finance | , , , | Leave a comment

Trains Are The New Age Planes

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Seeking Alpha.

It is an article well worth a read about the future development of railways in the United States.

August 19, 2020 Posted by | Business, Finance, Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Study Reveals Barriers To American Electric Car Adoption

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

The conclusion of the study from George Washington University, is that Americans don’t know much about electric vehicles.

And I suspect, that could apply to a lot of people and not just Americans.

August 6, 2020 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

An Untidy Railway

I took these pictures as I returned from Eridge.

You see it all over the railways and not just in the UK; general untidiness!

When I joined ICI in 1968, I went on a thorough and excellent induction course.

One very experienced engineer, gave a Health and Safety Lecture and one thing he said, was that a neat and tidy chemical plant was less likely to have silly accidents.

Some years later, I went to the United States to see some of Metier’s clients, of whom some were nuclear power stations. This must have been just after the Three Mile Island accident, which is described like this in Wikipedia.

The Three Mile Island accident was a partial meltdown of reactor number 2 of Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station (TMI-2) in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, near Harrisburg, and subsequent radiation leak that occurred on March 28, 1979. It is the most significant accident in U.S. commercial nuclear power plant history.

Artemis was involved in maintenance at the nuclear stations I visited. I can remember at AEP Donald C Cook nuclear station being shown a database of work to do and many of the actions were referred to as TMIs and checking them had been mandated by the US regulatory authorities.

I should say, the site on the shores of Lake Michigan impressed me, but another I visited later didn’t. I won’t name it, as it is now closed and it was the most untidy industrial plant of any type I have visited.

As we left, I gave my opinion to our support engineer and he told me they had a very large number of TMIs to process. I wasn’t surprised!

So why are railways generally so untidy?

 

June 23, 2020 Posted by | Transport, World | , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Air-Powered Energy Storage Knocks Out Coal & Gas — Wait, What?

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on CleanTechnica.

After reading, this must read article, it could have had a title with Knocks Out Coal, Gas and Nuclear.

It makes a passionate article for Highview Power’s long term air-powered energy storage and other systems with a similar energy profile like Form Energy.

It also showed this good graphic from Highview Power, which shows how their system works.

This paragraph gives Highview’s view on what their CRYObatteries will do.

Grid operators are turning to long-duration energy storage to improve power generation economics, balance the grid, and increase reliability. At giga-scale, CRYOBatteries paired with renewables are equivalent in performance to – and could replace – thermal and nuclear baseload power in addition to supporting electricity transmission and distribution systems while providing additional security of supply,” enthuses Highview.

The author then chips in with the attitude of the US Department of Energy.

Don’t just take their word for it. The US Department of Energy is eyeballing long duration energy storage for the sparkling green grid of the future despite all the hot air blowing out of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

In an interesting twist, the Energy Department’s interest in long duration storage was initially connected to its interest in at least preserving, if not growing, the nation’s aging fleet of nuclear power plants.

Will renewables be able to see off nuclear in a country with plenty of sun and/or wind like the United States?

Conclusion

With a lot of help from their friends in the long term energy storage business, the answer must be yes!

 

June 20, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , | Leave a comment