The Anonymous Widower

The Secret Of The TwinHub

I was reading about the TwinHub, which is a pair of wind turbines, that are to be mounted on a single float.

There is an explanatory video on the TwinHub home page. Just scroll the page down and you’ll find a full page video, that is rather beautiful and slightly hypnotic.

But note how it stops and starts in the wind and turns itself into a position, so that it is generating the maximum amount of wind.

So how does it do that?

It is not by clever computers and a whole host of actuators, but by good old-fashioned aerodynamics.

Above the video, there is a picture of the sea, with these words underneath.

This demonstration project will be located at the Wave Hub site, and will consist of two floating platforms anchored to the seabed. Each floating platform will host two turbines with inclined towers. The total installed capacity will be between 30 to 40 MW.

Two words are the key to the design – inclined towers.

The wind will apply a force to each turbine and because the towers are inclined, this will apply a force, that will turn the turbines so they are facing the wind. This will maximise the power generated.

The design is elegant, efficient and enchanting.

I can see the TwinHub becoming an unusual tourist attraction in Cornwall.

 

November 30, 2022 Posted by | Design, Energy | , , | Leave a comment

Passengers Of Reduced Mobility And The Elizabeth Line

I took these pictures at Whitechapel station and they show the preferred wheelchair entry point to the Class 345 train and the central car of the train, which has four wheelchair spaces.

Note.

  1. The well-signed wheelchair entrance to the train.
  2. Thw four wheelchair spaces are in the middle car of the train.
  3. There is no step into the train.
  4. The roundels also have directions to other lines and the way out.

The car also has longitudinal seating and lots of vertical grab rails.

I do find it strange that London is very much alone in the UK in using this seating design.

November 30, 2022 Posted by | Design, Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Ukraine Tender Would Pair Hydroelectric Plants With Large-Scale Battery Storage

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Energy Storage News.

This is a must-read article, as it outlines the damage that Russia is doing to Ukraine’s energy generation.

It also reports how the World Bank is trying to help.

November 30, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where Should You Travel On An Elizabeth Line Train?

The Lizzie Line has one very annoying problem.

When you catch a train, how do you know which is the best place to board the train, so that you get off at the right place to continue your journey?

I regularly go between the Moorgate entrance at Liverpool Street station to the Barbican entrance at Farringdon station.

  • Liverpool Street station is a double-ended station with an Eastern entrance at Liverpool Street station and a Western entrance at Moorgate station.
  • At Moorgate the Western end of the train is closest to the Moorgate Lizzie Line entrance and it is about a hundred metres walk on the level and two escalators between platform and street level.
  • Farringdon station is a double-ended station with an Eastern entrance near to the Barbican and a Western entrance at Farringdon station.
  • At Farringdon the Eastern end of the train is closest to the Barbican Lizzie Line entrance and it is about a hundred metres walk on the level and two escalators between platform and street level.

Ideally between the Moorgate entrance at Liverpool Street station to the Barbican entrance at Farringdon station, you would want to travel in the Eastern end of the train, as this would mean you had a quick getaway.

So you have to do one of these three things.

  • Walk two hundred metres to the Eastern end of the platforms at Liverpool Street station and board the train at its Eastern end.
  • Board the train at its Western end and walk back two hundred metres or so to the Eastern end of the platforms on arrival at Farringdon station to exit the station at the Barbican entrance.
  • Board the train at its Western end and walk back two hundred metres or so inside the train to the Eastern end before alighting at the Barbican end of Farringdon station to exit the station. Be warned, that Heathrow trains can be blocked by cases, as I said in So Many Cases On A Train!.

I take a different route.

  • I use the lift at the Moorgate Lizzie Line entrance to drop to the Westbound Circle/Hammersmith & City/Metropolitan Line platform.
  • I get the first Underground train that arrives.
  • Whilst it is running to Barbican station, I walk as far forward as I can get.
  • I alight at Barbican station and walk to the Western end of the platform.
  • From there, I take the lift and an escalator to street level.

It is a route which is step-free with less walking and two lifts and an escalator.

I suspect many regular Lizzie Line passengers will have their own regular short cuts.

Station Alighting Positions

These are in my view, the best place to be in a train, when travelling to these stations.

  • Abbey Wood – Eastern end
  • Acton Main Line – Eastern half
  • Bond Street – Hanover Square – Eastern end
  • Bond Street – Davies Street – Western end
  • Bond Street – Central Line – Western end
  • Bond Street – Jubilee Line – Western end
  • Brentwood – Western end
  • Burnham – Middle
  • Canary Wharf – Escalators both ends and lifts in the middle
  • Chadwell Heath – Eastern end
  • Custom House – Middle and lift at Western end
  • Ealing Broadway – Western end
  • Ealing Broadway – Central Line – Western end
  • Ealing Broadway – District Line – Western end
  • Farringdon – Barbican – Eastern end
  • Farringdon – Circle Line – Western end
  • Farringdon – Farringdon – Western end
  • Farringdon – Hammersmith & City Line – Western end
  • Farringdon – Thameslink – Western end
  • Forest Gate – Eastern end
  • Gidea Park – Western half
  • Goodmayes – Western end
  • Hanwell – Eastern half
  • Harold Wood – Western end
  • Hayes and Harlington – Western end
  • Heathrow Central – Eastern end
  • Heathrow Terminal 4 – Western end
  • Heathrow Terminal 5 – Eastern end
  • Ilford – Eastern end
  • Iver – Eastern half
  • Langley – Middle
  • Liverpool Street – Central Line – Eastern end
  • Liverpool Street – Circle Line – Either end
  • Liverpool Street – Hammersmith & City Line – Either end
  • Liverpool Street – Liverpool Street – Eastern end
  • Liverpool Street – Liverpool Street – National Rail – Eastern end
  • Liverpool Street – Metropolitan Line – Either end
  • Liverpool Street – Moorgate – Western end
  • Liverpool Street – Moorgate – National Rail – Western end
  • Liverpool Street – Northern Line – Western end
  • Maidenhead – Middle
  • Manor Park – Eastern end
  • Maryland – Middle
  • Paddington – Escalators both ends and lifts in the middle
  • Reading – Middle
  • Romford – Eastern end
  • Seven Kings – Eastern end
  • Shenfield – Eastern end
  • Slough – Eastern half
  • Southall – Middle
  • Stratford – Middle
  • Taplow – Western half
  • Tottenham Court Road – Central Line – Eastern end
  • Tottenham Court Road – Dean Street – Western end
  • Tottenham Court Road – Northern Line – Eastern end
  • Tottenham Court Road – Tottenham Court Road – Eastern end
  • Twyford – Western half
  • West Drayton – Western end
  • West Ealing – Eastern end
  • Whitechapel – District Line – Western end
  • Whitechapel – Hammersmith & City Line – Western end
  • Whitechapel – Overground – Western end
  • Whitechapel – Western end
  • Woolwich – Western end
  • Woolwich – Docklands Light Railway – Western end
  • Woolwich – National Rail – Western end

Note.

  1. Where another line is indicated, the position is for the interchange.
  2. By end, I mean the two end cars.
  3. By half, I mean the end four cars.

All of the routes have lifts.

November 30, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Is This Normal Behaviour Of Lizzie Line Passengers?

Suppose I’m using the Lizzie Line to go between Moorgate and Brentwood, I might get on the first train, if the one I need is not the first.

I will then change to the train I need at an intermediate station.

It’s just that the seats in the trains are more comfortable than those on the stations. My journey time will be the same, but my bottom will be pleased!

These are typical hard steel station seats.

And these are upholstered ones on a train.

In today’s weather the trains were also a bit warmer!

Do other passengers do this?

November 30, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , | Leave a comment

Hyperion XP-1 Hydrogen Car Unveiled With 1,000-mile Range

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Fuel News.

This is the specification of the hydrogen-powered Hyperion XP-1.

  • 1,000 mile range.
  • No batteries as it uses supercapacitors.
  • Five minute refuelling time
  • All-wheel drive
  • 221 mph top speed
  • 0-to-60 mph in 2.2 seconds
  • Weighs just over a tonne
  • Carbon-titanium monocoque
  • Outrageous styling

Unbelievable!

 

November 29, 2022 Posted by | Design, Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Innovative Hydrogen Energy Storage Project Secures Over £7 million In Funding

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from the University of Bristol.

These two paragraphs outline the project.

A consortium, involving the University of Bristol, has been awarded £7.7m from the Net Zero Innovation Portfolio (NZIP) of UK Government’s Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to develop pioneering hydrogen storage.

The University, EDF UK, UKAEA and Urenco will together develop a hydrogen storage demonstrator, in which hydrogen is absorbed on a depleted uranium ‘bed’, which can then release the hydrogen when needed for use. When stored, the hydrogen is in a stable but reversible ‘metal hydride’ form. The depleted uranium material is available from recycling and has been used in other applications such as counterbalance weights on aircraft.

I particularly like this paragraph from Professor Tom Scott.

Professor Tom Scott from the University’s School of Physics and one of the architects of the HyDUStechnology, said: “This will be a world first technology demonstrator which is a beautiful and exciting translation of a well proven fusion-fuel hydrogen isotope storage technology that the UK Atomic Energy Authority has used for several decades at a small scale. The hydride compounds that we’re using can chemically store hydrogen at ambient pressure and temperature but remarkably they do this at twice the density of liquid hydrogen. The material can also quickly give-up the stored hydrogen simply by heating it, which makes it a wonderfully reversible hydrogen storage technology.”

It’s elegant and it certainly, is an unusual method of storing hydrogen.

I do see a problem in that depleted uranium is controversial because of its use in munitions; most notably in the Gulf War.

I also see its heavy weight being rather a disadvantage in storing hydrogen for mobile applications.

So, I will keep an open mind on this technology.

November 29, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Hydrogen, Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Plan For £8.25m Plymouth Energy Plant To Generate Power From Cream-Like Fluid

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on PlymouthLive.

These two paragraphs outline the project.

Plymouth’s Hemerdon tungsten mine has been chosen as the site of a pioneering £8.25m hydro energy plant which would see a cream-like fluid used to generate electricity. London-based renewable energy company RheEnergise wants to start construction of the High-Density Hydro storage system at the Plympton site as early as summer 2023.

The company has already spoken to the parish council and is to submit plans to Devon County Council soon. It hopes permission will be given and the site will be in operation by the end of 2023 and then trialled for two years before the technology is rolled out nationally and worldwide.

Note.

  1. RheEnergise has a web page, which describes how their High-Density Hydro storage system works.
  2. The system is sized at 250kW/1MWh and is described in the article as a demonstrator plant.
  3. In the future, rojects will range from 5MW to 100MW of power and can work with vertical elevations as low as 100m or less.

This sentence from the article lays out the potential of the system.

RheEnergise’s analysis of potential project opportunities has indicated there are about 6,500 possible sites in the UK, about 115,000 in Europe, about 345,000 in North America and about 500,000 in Africa and the Middle East.

This method of storing energy could be very useful.

Where Is Hemerdon Tungsten Mine?

This is a Google Map of the Plymouth area.

The red arrow indicates the Hemerdon Tungsten Mine, which has a Wikipedia entry as Drakelands Mine, where this is said about the last three years.

Tungsten West plc, which floated on the London Stock Exchange’s Alternative Investment Market on 21 October 2021,[49] have taken over the mine. They have conducted a review starting from the basics, of what is required to fix the problems that caused Wolf Minerals to fail. A better understanding of the mineralogy, with associated changes to the processing stream, and aggregate sales should lead to the mine re-opening at scale in 2022.

Tungsten West’s share price has had an up-and-down day. But are they adding energy storage to their income streams?

From the map, it does seem to be a possibility.

 

November 29, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , | Leave a comment

Wrightbus Hydrogen Fleet Cover 1,5 Million Miles

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Hydrogen Central.

These are the first two paragraphs.

Leading bus manufacturer Wrightbus’s fleet of hydrogen fuel-cell buses have travelled a staggering 1.5 million miles since first entering service.

This latest milestone from the Ballymena-based firm means the hydrogen fuel-cell fleet has prevented 2,366 tonnes of harmful carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions entering the atmosphere compared to journeys made by an equivalent diesel bus.

It does appear that the company is on the road to a much needed recovery.

November 29, 2022 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , | 1 Comment

Dartmoor Line Passes 250,000 Journeys On Its First Anniversary, As Rail Minister Visits To Mark Official Opening Of The Station Building

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from Network Rail.

These three paragraphs talk about the Dartmoor Line’s reopening.

Just over a year after the Dartmoor Line reopened to regular passenger trains, journey numbers on the line have passed 250,000 this Monday morning [28 November], with the arrival of an extra special visitor, Rail Minister, Huw Merriman MP, to officially open the renovated station building.

The line reopened on 20 November 2021, restoring a regular, year-round service for the first time in almost 50 years following more than £40m of Government investment.

The previously mothballed rail line, which runs between Okehampton and Exeter, was restored in just nine months and delivered £10m under budget, becoming the first former line to reopen under the Government’s £500m Restoring Your Railway programme.

I have a few thoughts.

A Well-Managed Project

It does appear that Network Rail upped a gear or two to fulfil this project. The press release puts it like this.

Reinstatement of the Dartmoor Line was made possible by Network Rail’s team of engineers who worked tirelessly to deliver a huge programme of work including laying 11 miles of new track and installing 24,000 concrete sleepers and 29,000 tonnes of ballast in a record-breaking 20-day period.

But it does appear that over recent months Network Rail seems to do things a lot better and quicker.

I do wonder, if on the construction side, Network Rail have been able to bring in new working practices, that they are still trying to get lots of their other workers to accept.

A Quarter Of A Million Journeys

The press release says this about passenger numbers.

In the same week as it celebrated its one-year anniversary, the Dartmoor Line also saw its 250,000th journey, showing an incredible patronage on the line and more than double the demand originally forecast.

But they still can’t get the forecasts right.

Passenger Numbers Are Still Rising

The press release says this about rising passenger numbers

Since Great Western Railway (GWR) increased services to hourly in May 2022, passenger use has continued to rise, with over 500 journeys starting at Okehampton every day and a further 300 travelling into the town from across the rail network.

Is There Still Growth To Come?

There are several zero-carbon trains under development, so why not have a civilised shoot out, with each manufacturer given say four weeks in which to show off their products in passenger service.

This would hopefully indicate, if there was more growth to come and what would be the best trains to use.

Conclusion

The Dartmoor Line has been shown to be a success so lets repeat the dose.

 

 

November 28, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 3 Comments