The Anonymous Widower

The Changing Face Of Cambridge

I took these pictures, as my train to Cambridge North station, made a stop at Cambridge station.

There’s certainly been a lot of new building.

Over the years, I’ve seen Cambridge station change from a simple station, where staff had to work hard to juggle terminating and through trains to maintain a decent service into a major rail interchange with the following platforms.

  • Two very long through platforms; 1 and 7, capable of taking the longest trains on the UK rail network.
  • Platform 1 is actually bi-directional and can be used as two shorter platforms; 1 and 4.
  • Two London-facing bay platforms; 2 and 3 capable of taking eight-car trains.
  • Two North-facing bay platforms; 5 and 6, capable of taking six-car trains from Ipswich, Norwich, Peterborough and the North.
  • A twelve-car platform; 8, that can be used as either a through or a bay platform.

Is there another regional station in the UK with such a comprehensive layout?

Cambridge station and its new sibling a few miles to the North are certainly ready for all the rail developments planned to happen in the next few years.

  • Thameslink arrives in 2018
  • Greater Anglia’s new trains arrive in 2019.
  • The East-West Rail Link could arrive in the mid-2020s.

I would not be surprised if Cambridge created the Trinity by starting the proposed new Cambridge South station at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in the next couple of years.

After all, a third station, will give Cambridge one more station than Oxford.

 

 

 

May 21, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Connecting Ebbsfleet International To South London

In the May 2017 Edition of Modern Railways, there is an article entitled Kent Capacity Constraints Highlighted.

The article says this.

The provision of a direct connection from Ebbsfleet to South London is proposed using the route from Swanley to Fawkham Junction, which was used by Eurostar services to Waterloo. Options include providing a new terminal platform at Ebbsfleet adjacent to the existing lines or a connection into the existing domestic platforms.

This Google Map shows the Chatham Main Line between Farningham Road and Longfield stations.

Note.

  1. The Chatham Main Line goes from West to East across the map.
  2. Fawkham Junction to the West of Longfield station.
  3. The rail line curves away North-Easterly to Ebbsfleet International station, using the same track-bed as the former Gravesend West Line.

This Google Map shows Ebbsfleet International station.

Note.

  1. HS1 runs North-South through the station.
  2. HighSpeed services to Thanet destinations use the line that runs across the map from North-West to East.
  3. HighSpeed services to Ashford Internationl station have their own separate platforms on HS1.

The local line into Ebbsfleet International station can be as simple or complicated as the budget will allow.

The simplest arrangement would be where a single track chord connects the Gravesend West Line into the space between the stations and its Eastern car parks.

This Google Map shows the station and the Gravesend West Line.

It almost looks like a good bit of space was left to connect Ebbsfleet International station to Fawkham Junction.

Train Services To Ebbsfleet

Southeastern and Thamesline are probably in pole position to provide services, as their services call at Swanley station which would be directly connected to Ebbsfleet International by the new link.

The most efficient solution would be a shuttle train or even a tram-train, at a frequency of four trains per hour.

But we shouldn’t forget Crossrail, that could be extended to Gravesend.

May 14, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Has Thameslink Got The Wrong Length Of Train?

The Train And Half-Train Philosophy

If you look at some recent train orders, they seem to suggest a train and half-train philosophy.

  • Great Western Railway’s order for Class 80x trains.
  • Virgin Trains East Coast’s order for Class 80x trains.
  • Greater Anglia’s order for Aventras.

In all these orders, it would appear that two half-trains are used to create a full train, when needed. This coupling and uncoupling is done throughout the day and often on an automatic basis.

Thameslink’s Class 700 Trains

Thameslink’s Class 700 trains only come in lengths of eight and twelve cars.

The eight-car train is needed for short platforms on the Sutton Loop Line.

But eight-car trains have disadvantages compared to say a six-car train.

  • Two trains can’t be joined together to make a long train.
  • Sixteen-car trains would be just too long for operational reasons.
  • An eight-car train uses one of the valuable twenty-four hourly paths through the central core of Thameslink, just as a twelve-car train does.

The train length seems to be inefficient.

Maximising Capacity In The Core

The capacity of the central core depends on how many trains go through in an hour.

Current proposals given in Wikipedia are as follows.

  • 14 x 12-car trains
  • 10 x 8-car trains

If the 8-car trains were replaced with 12-cars, this would give a sixteen percent increase in capacity in the central core.

The Sutton Loop Line

The Sutton Loop Line could be run by using six-car trains that split and join in the area of Streatham station.

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows the track layout at Streatham, at the start of the loop.

Note.

  1. Streatham South Junction is the gateway to the Sutton Loop, with the tracks to the West going via Tooting station and those to the South via Mitcham Eastfields station.
  2. There is a lot of spare land in this area.
  3. Transport for London keep talking bout creating an interchange at this point.

I think, if and when the interchange is built, it could be designed, so that it increased traffic around the Sutton Loop Line.

  • Two six-car trains running as a twelve-car could split at the interchange.
  • One train would go round the loop clockwise and the other anti-clockwise.
  • The trains would rejoin together at the interchange.

The same procedure could be done at Streatham, without creating the interchange, but it would be unreliable, if trains got delayed on the loop.

Currently, two trains per hour (tph) are proposed to run in both directions on the Sutton Loop Line.

This requires four eight-car trains and four paths through the central core.

If four six-car trains were to be used, running in pairs splitting at Streatham or a new Streatham Common interchange, there would still be two tph in both directions round the Sutton Loop, but only two paths would be needed in the central core.

Splitting Trains At The End Of A Trip

I don’t think there are many opportunities at the current time, except possibly could the Bedford to Littlehampton service, be made up of two six-car trains instead of a 12-car train split at Haywards Heath, with one train going to Littlehampton and the other going to Lewes and Seaford.

But as Thameslink develops, with perhaps more stations and electrification, the use of this technique might increase.

Although, It should be noted that the current eight-car trains are not suitable.

To maximise traffic in the central

Eight-Car Trains Across The City

Three of the services through the core are as follows.

  • Cambridge North and Maidstone East.
  • /Luton(Peak)/Kentish Town(Off Peak) and Orpington
  • Welwyn Garden City and Sevenoaks

All services are served by eight-car trains, with the first two services running all day.

In the May 2017 Edition of Modern Railways, there is an article entitled Kent Capacity Constraints Highlighted.

Reading this article, gives the impression that several stations served by Thameslink in the Southeastern area have platforms that are a tad short.

So perhaps this is the reason for the short trains.

But would using two six-car trains joining at a station like Bromley South station, enable another twelve-car train to go through the central core.

Conclusion

Six-car trains instead of eight-car trains on Thameslink, may increase capacity.

According to Wikipedia, the formation of the two trains are as follows.

  • Class 700/0 – DMCO-PTSO-MSO-TSO-TSO-MSO-PTSO-DMCO
  • Class 700/1 – DMCO-PTSO-MSO-MSO-TSO-TSO-TSO-TSO-MSO-MSO-PTSO-DMCO

It would appear that the 12-car trains have two extra MSO cars and two extra TSO cars.

If all the TSO and MSO cars are identical, I wouldn’t be surprised that to lengthen the trains from eight to 12 cars, is just a cut-and-shut job, as it is with the London Overground’s Class 378 trains and Crossrail’s Class 345 trains.

With sixteen percent extra capacity by lengthening all trains to twelve cars, I would expect that this capacity will be claimed when needed.

 

 

May 14, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , | Leave a comment

Reverse Commuting To Cambridge North Station

Cambridge North station opens on the 21st May 2017.

Around 1070, I commuted from London to Welwyn Garden City. It was much more relaxing than sharing the busy trains into London and on early trips to Cambridge in the last few years, I’ve noticed that quite a few people commute from London to Cambridge.

So given the proximity of the new Cambridge North station to the Cambridge Science Park, I wonder how many will use the service to get to and from their place of work?

The Service On Sunday, 21st May 2017

Trains would appear to be every hour at XX:42 taking about ten minutes under two hours.

The Service On Monday, 22nd May 2017

The weekday service would appear to be more comprehensive.

  • 06:08 KX 1:02
  • 06:44 KX 0:53
  • 06:52 KX 1.14
  • 07:04 KX 1:32
  • 07:28 LS 1:32
  • 08:04 KX 1:29
  • 08:14 KX 1:00
  • 08:28 LS 1:33

Note that KX is Kings Cross and LS is Liverpool Street.

All the trains shown arrive before 10:00 or a few minutes after.

Given that Thameslink will improve this service in May 2018, by adding another two trains per hour, it is certainly a good start.

May 12, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Last ‘319s’ On Thameslink This Summer

The title of this post is the title of an article in the May 2017 Edition of Modern Railways.

This is the first paragraph of the article.

Govia Thameslink Railway plans to withdraw its last Class 319s by the end of June, allowing it to operate a full Class 700 service on Thameslink this summer.

According to Wikipedia on the 28th April 2017, Thameslink still have thirty-five examples (319/0 – 13 and 319/4 – 22) and there are twelve examples Off Lease (319/2 – 1,319/3- 6 and 319/4 – 5)

So it looks like there could be a maximum of forty-seven trains released, of the following types.

In Riding In A Clean Class 319/4 Train, I wrote about riding in a particularly nice Class 319/4 train. If any of the other twenty-six are in as good a condition, operators will want to take them over.

There’s certainly enough trains to keep the refurbishment line busy for four or five years.

There is also plenty of scope for speculation about the specification of the refurbished trains and where the trains will see service.

  • How many will end up as bi-mode Class 319 Flex trains?
  • How many will retain their third rail capability?
  • How many will retain their First Class seats?
  • How many will get wi-fi?
  • How many will end up in a reserve fleet to cover for train shortages? Think level crossing accidents!
  • Will any have a luxury interior, so they can be used as special event trains and shuttles? Think Edinburgh to St. Andrews for the Open or Manchester to Aintree for the Grand National!
  • Will any be bought for use in non-passenger roles? Think 100 mph parcel carriers bringing goods into and out of big city stations at three in the morning!
  • Will any be bought by Network Rail for engineering purposes? Think testing and checking overhead and third-rail electrification!

Uses will be demand-led and I suspect some will be very surprising.

Operators have never had a train that is both a 100 mph electric train and a 90 mph diesel train, which is available, affordable and proven.

I shall discuss a few of the ideas in detail.

Parcels Trains

Currently, Royal Mail uses the closely-related Class 325 trains to move parcels traffic around the country. These trains have the following specification.

  • They are four-car electric units.
  • They can run as four, eight and twelve car units.
  • They are 100 mph dual-voltage trains.
  • Each car can carry twelve tonnes.
  • They use the same running gear as the Class 319 trains.

If they have a problem it is that they can only run on electrified lines, so they seem to be confined to the West and East Coast Main Lines.

Royal Mail and their train operator DB Cargo UK, might be interested in some more trains. They might even have use for some Class 319 Flex trains for routes with no or partial electrification.

In A Station At Doncaster Sheffield Airport, I talked of Peel Group’s plans to develop the Airport.

I said this.

It should also be stated that Doncaster Sheffield Airport has air cargo ambitions.

Consider.

  • It has a massive runway, that was able to accept the Space Shuttle in an emergency.
  • The airport has lots of space for cargo terminals.
  • The largest cargo planes, that exist only in the minds of Airbus and Boeing engineers would be welcome.
  • The Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway, which is a major freight route between the South East and the North passes the airport.
  • Plans exist to create a network of high speed package carrying trains. I’d use Doncaster Shjeffield Airport as a hub.
  • Amazon already fly freight to and from the Airport. Deliveries could leave the United States in the evening and be in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Liverpool, London and Manchester  for a morning delivery.

It looks like the Peel Group have a plan to create a transport interchange for both passengers and freight for a cost of millions, not billions. But it were to be worth spending billions, I’m certain that they can obtain it.

Could Class 319 trains be the trains delivering the parcels to main-line stations all over the country for onward distribution?

There must also be specialist and possibly perishable cargoes like fish and flowers, perhaps between Cornwall and London. Some of the cargoes now go in the large space in the locomotives of the InterCity 125s , but these trains are being phased out.

Could a Class 319 Flex train substitue with honour?

The Luxury Go-Anywhere Shuttle Train

Look at the venues for the Open Championship and they seem to be tucked away. But supposing there was an all Class 319 Flex train fitted with all First Class seating and a bar, it would make a very good alternative to get spectators to the venue in style.

Other venues within the trains range would include.

  • Aintree, Ascvot, Chelternham, Doncaster, Epsom, Goodwood, Haydock Park, Newbury, Newmarket, Sandown Park and York racecourses.
  • Glastonbury for the Festival
  • Henley for the Regatta.
  • Important football and rugby matches.

Travel First Class in any InterCity 125 and you realise the standard that can be applied to a Mark 3 coach.

Reserve Trains

Greater Anglia are often short of a train or two, with the cause often being a level crossing accident.

Their way round the problem is to hire in two Class 68 locomotives and some elderly coaches.

But surely, a better way, would be to have an appropriate number of Class 319 Flex trains available for hire with a driver!

They could deputise for a 100 mph electric train and an up to 90 mph diesel train.

Network Rail Use

Network Rail have a highly-instrumented InterCity 125 called the New Measurement Train, which is used to test the condition of the tracks all over the UK.

But it can only test those tracks where an InterCity 125 train is allowed.

If Network Rail ever need to create a smaller version of the train and especially one to test both overhead and third-rail electrification systems, a Class 319 train would be a candidate.

Conclusion

Porterbrook’s Sales and Marketing Department are going to have fun!

 

 

 

 

 

April 28, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Passengers At Cambridge Station

I found a reference to the passenger growth at Cambridge station, which is confirmed in Wikipedia.

In 2011/12 passengers at the station were around 9 million and in 2015/16 that had grown to around 11 million.

Consider.

  • Cambridge North station opens in May this year.
  • Thameslink will start services to Cambridge from all over London in 2018.
  • Greater Anglia will be increasing capacity and frequency to Bury St. Edmunds, Colchester, Ipswich, Norwich, Peterborough and Stansted Airport.

So what will be the traffic in say 2020?

 

January 29, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

Will DOO Mean DOO on Thameslink?

On Thursday I took a Thameslink Class 700 train from St. Pancras to Blackfriars.

A Class 700 At Blackfriars

A Class 700 At Blackfriars

At Blackfriars an announcement said that the doors would open automatically.

Which they did without any of the usual intervention from passengers after the driver had released the doors.

This is how DOO works on the London Underground.

It is surely better, especially if you are getting off and your hands are otherwise engaged.

December 24, 2016 Posted by | Travel | , , | 6 Comments

Has Sadiq Khan Got His Sums Right?

This article on the Rail Technology web site, which is entitled Underground set to undergo biggest capacity expansion ever, is a good summary of Sadiq Khan’s plans for Transport for London.

It’s All About Cash Flow

I am unsure about the plans, as it seems to me that a there is a lot of money to find in two years less to fund the building of the Bakerloo Line Extension.

So there is the double whammy of the fare freeze and accelerated construction!

Crossrail And Thameslink

I also think that Crossrail will contribute some of this money and because it is properly designed, it will stimulate growth in areas like Canary Wharf, Farringdon, Old Oak Common, Paddington, Romford and West Drayton, to name a few places.

The same however, can’t be said for Thameslink.

  • It doesn’t serve many areas ripe for development.
  • As it is not a TfL route like Crossrail, it won’t generate anything like the same fare revenue.
  • Thameslink could turn out to be too much of a long-distance commuter line.
  • Govia Thameslink Railway’s first loyalty is not to London.

On the whole, I don’t think it will benefit London as much as Crossrail will.

The Underground

Until I learn otherwise, I do think that the engineers of the Underground, may have thrown the Mayor a few lifelines.

  1. It would appear that the Victoria and Jubilee Lines can go to 36 trains per hour (tph).
  2. By raising the voltage and installing automatic train control on the sub-surface lines, there can be a 33 % increase in capacity.
  3. New Piccadilly Line trains will be ordered in 2017.

One and two, should happen easily and if the design is right, three could be a big game-changer.

But the problem, is that although these will generate cash flow in the long term, only 36 tph on the Victoria Line will happen in the near future.

I also feel, that although the capacity of the Victoria Line can easily be increased, will the stations be able to cope. Highbury and Islington, Oxford Circus and Victoria are not mentioned in the article.

All of these trains and passengers will also generate lots of heat and although Crossrail is designed to handle the watts, the deep-level Underground trains and stations were not.

This might mean a route change by passengers from older lines to Crossrail, which could have various effects.

The Non-Devolution Of Rail Lines To TfL

I have a feeling that the figures show that this is very much neutral to TfL’s finances, as some of the routes need a lot of money spent on stations and new trains. But under the new arrangement, TfL will probably have more say in service quality on the lines, than they do now.

Good Design Of The Bakerloo Line Extension

There must surely be scope to save more money in the design of the Bakerloo Line Extension. But I suspect that most of the easy savings have already been found.

However, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a radical  design for the extension come out at a late stage. But this is less likely, as because the line is an extension, it must be compatible with the existing line.

The Petty Cash

I think that where the Mayor might make up the shortfall is in the smaller things, that people forget.

For example.

  • Expansion of the Night Tube to all lines, the Drain and the Overground.
  • Tactical and expanded contactless ticketing.
  • Better train scheduling.
  • Expansion of the Gospel Oak to Barking Line and the Barking Riverside Extension.
  • Expansion of the East London and Lea Valley Lines.
  • Extra stations and station entrances.
  • Development of Old Oak Common.

But some things already proposed will be tricky.

  • I don’t think that he’ll save the money he wants on staff.
  • Politicians always overestimate what they’ll earn from property development.
  • You can only build so much affordable housing.
  • Developers might find building housing just outside London is more profitable.
  • The Mayor could have Union trouble.

There are probably a lot more where these came from.

Conclusion

With Brexit and Trump, there is a possibility of a drop in passenger numbers and income, which could derail everything.

It will be a close run thing.

December 9, 2016 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Natives Are Getting Restless In Crofton Park

One of my Google Alerts picked up this article on Brockley Central, which is entitled You Shall Go To Blackfriars – Join The Campaign For Crofton Park Trains Every Fifteen Minutes.

This is said.

Local action groups aren’t supposed to be this successful. The Cinderella Line is a campaign to improve the frequency and quality of services that run through Crofton Park Station.

The group has had a recent success, in that there are now four more trains stopping at the station in the peak.

So I thought I’d go and have a look, getting my paper and some bits of shopping I need on the way.

I had started out, just before 0900, with the aim of getting the 0930 Thameslink train to Crofton Park station. Hopefully, it would have been running a bit late, so I could use my Freedom Pass.

But it was worse than that, as the train had been cancelled, so in the end, I had to take a train to Catford station and then come back a station to get to Crofton Park. As I couldn’t afford to wait, I had to pay for the ticket myself.

Not that I’m bothered!

But did Thameslink cancel the first train after 0930, to force people to catch an earlier train at full price, if they wanted to get to work on time?

Am I being cynical?

These pictures tell the story of my journey to Crofton Park and back via Peckham Rye station to Haggerston station, from where I walked home.

A few points.

Overcrowding

I took three Thameslink trains and one London Overground train this morning.

  • St. Pancras to Catford – 8-cars and overcrowded until Farringdon.
  • Catford to Crofton Park – 4-cars and crowded.
  • Crofton Park to Peckham Rye – 4-cars and overcrowded
  • Peckham Rye to Haggerston – 5-cars and plenty of space, with seats for those who wanted them.

Considering, that all these journeys were in the Off Peak, except for the last Overground train, it is just not good enough.

Crofton Park Station

Crofton Park station, is typical of many stations, that are South of the Thames.

  • It is certainly scruffy.
  • The main entrance is not step-free and the stairs are steep.
  • The platforms are ready for twelve-car trains.
  • There was a bad gap to mind, between train and platform.
  • Staff were only noticeable by their absence.
  • A fellow passenger said that announcements were unreliable.
  • The information displays were not of the best.
  • Typical Off peak services are 2 trains per hour (tph)

But it was certainly a station, that with the spending of some money to add lifts, could be a station of high quality and a modicum of quality.

The New Class 700 Trains

Hopefully, the new eight-car Class 700 trains will improve matters at Crofton Park, as they are better designed than the overcrowded four-car Class 319 trains, that I had to endure this morning.

This report on Brockley Central, says this about the new trains.

“We have also been pushing Thameslink to introduce new Class 700 trains, with 30% more capacity than the trains we currently have. The first of these will appear from the end of November and then replace our current trains at the rate of one per week.

So that is good news.

Extra Services To Victoria And Blackfriars

The report on Brockley Central, says this about the new services.

“From December 12th, four new trains will stop at Crofton Park between 7-9am . Three will go on to Denmark Hill and Victoria and one to Elephant & Castle and Blackfriars.

“The Victoria services currently pass through Crofton Park but don’t stop there, so they will now make the additional stop at Crofton Park.

So that is good news as well.

The interesting thing about these new train services, is that no new services are actually being introduced, but the extra service at Crofton Park is being created by getting a train that normally goes straight through to stop at Crofton Park.

The latest generation of trains, are designed to execute a stop and start in a minimum time, so I think we’ll see extra stops added on more than a few services.

This quick stop feature is achieved by several things.

  • Powerful braking and acceleration.
  • Wide doors.
  • Level step between train and platform.
  • Good information, so passengers getting on can find space.
  • Good coordination between the driver and staff on the platform.

Increasingly, for some operators, a fast dwell time will be an important factor in choosing the trains to procure and providing a better service.

Here at Crofton Park station, it is being used to get extra trains to stop at the station.

Increasing Thsmeslink Frequency From 2 tph To 4 tph At Crofton Park Station

This is an aspiration for Crofton Park, but I suspect that this cannot be done at present, as there are not enough paths through the core Thameslink tunnel.

So until Thameslink is fully open in 2018, Crofton Park will probably get 2 tph.

Thameslink  is consulting on the service when the full service opens.

This document on the Thameslink web site, shows two different services calling at Crofton Park.

  • TL8 from Blackfriars (Welwyn Garden City in the Peaks) to Sevenoaks
  • TL9 from Kentish Town (Luton in the Peaks) to Orpington.

Both have a frequency of 2 tph at all times,so this gives 4 tph through Crofton Park.

Thameslink put it like this in their proposal.

Thameslink Metro Routes TL8 and TL9 combine to provide four trains per hour (daily) between Central London, Catford, Bromley South and Bickley. During peak times these services may be supplemented by Southeastern Metro services providing six trains per hour.

That’s a well-thought out service, by any standards.

The Catford Metro

I always like calling lines like this a Metro.

As Govia Thameslink Railway have just given the name of the Great Northern Metro to the services out of Moorgate, why not call this line the Catford Metro?

It would call at the following stations.

  • London Blackfriars
  • Elephant & Castle
  • Camberwell (if added)
  • Denmark Hill
  • Peckham Rye
  • Nunhead
  • Crofton Park
  • Catford
  • Bellingham
  • Beckenham Hill
  • Ravensbourne
  • Shortlands
  • Bromley South

So it looks like Crofton Park could be in the middle of a  Catford Metro.

  • It would have a frequency of at least 4 tph.
  • It would be running new eight-car Class 700 trains.
  • 2 tph would go North to each of Welwyn Garden City and Luton in the Peak
  • 2 tph would go North to each of Blackfriars and Kentish Town in the Off Peak
  • 2 tph would go South to each of Orpington and Sevenoaks.
  • It would have a good connection to the 4 tph South London Line at Denmark Hill and Peckham Rye.

It’s a lot better than Crofton Park has at the present time!

Conclusion

Crofton Park has a big future.

November 23, 2016 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Do We Sometimes Misjudge The Consequence Of New Railways And Roads?

I ask this question after reading this article in the Hawick News, which is entitled Calls for extension of Borders Railway to Hawick building up fresh head of steam.

It was this phrase that worried me.

“Hawick businesses are feeling the impact of a one-way ticket that is seeing local shoppers travel from Tweedbank to all points north without any reciprocal arrangements.

It looks like building the Borders Railway has hurt businesses in Hawick. And what about other places in the area like Selkirk?

I think we’ve seen this before in other places.

Where I live near Dalston Junction station, has seen a massive uplift, since the creation of the East London Line. It was in some ways predictable, but I don’t think Transport for London expected the uplift that happened.

Our predictions, were never good in the past, but they don’t seem to be improving.

I wonder how far out predictions will be for Crossrail/Thameslink?

Consider.

  • Crossrail and Thameslink working together will make a lot more journeys single change.
  • Crossrail has good connections with the East London Line.
  • Crossrail gives much improved access to the Bakerloo and Northern City Lines.
  • Crossrail/Thameslink gives much improved access to Canary Wharf, the City of London, Gatwick Airport, Heathrow Airport, Luton Airport and Oxford Street in the centre of the cap[ital.

One consequence I see, is that those with Freedom Passes like me, will use the new free railways to advantage.

Roll on 2018 and 2019!

 

 

 

 

November 14, 2016 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment