The Anonymous Widower

Construction Has Started On The Silvertown Tunnel

These pictures show that construction has started on the Silverton Tunnel.

Note that New Civil Engineer is reporting that tunnelling has started.

My Current Thoughts On The Silvertown Tunnel

In 2015, I wrote No To Silvertown Tunnel, which I started with these two paragraphs.

My personal feelings about the Silvertown Tunnel are that it is irrelevant to me, except that it might help some trucks bring goods that I buy online or at a local shop. Although as a sixty-eight year-old-widower living alone, I don’t think my transport needs through the tunnel will be high.

I don’t drive after my stroke and I like that lifestyle, except when last night it took me three trains, a coach and a taxi to get back from watching football at Ipswich. But that tortuous late night journey was caused because NuLabor spent my tax money on pointless wars that will haunt us for generations, rather than in extending and renewing our rail system, that will nurture and enrich our future.

But my objections to the Silvertown Tunnel have changed and expanded.

New Transport Infrastructure Attracts Passengers

This may seem obvious, but there has been several cases recently in London to prove my point.

  • The London Overground has been a success beyond Transport for London’s wildest dreams and as an example the North London Line, that started with three x three-car trains per hour (tph) is now running eight x five-car tph. This is a four time increase in capacity.
  • New buses and contactless ticketing have encouraged more passengers to use the buses.
  • Electrification and new trains has transformed the Gospel Oak to Barking Line.
  • The expansion of Thameslink and new trains now carries a lot more North-South traffic through London.
  • Every time, a new section of the Elizabeth Line opens more passengers are attracted to the new line.
  • The remodelling of London Bridge station has increased passenger numbers. And shoppers!

On a personal note, I live on a bus corridor, that runs between North London and Moorgate for the Lizzie Line. Since the Lizzie Line has been fully connected, passenger numbers have risen by a big margin.

I don’t believe that the ability to attract more traffic of the Silvertown Tunnel will be any different.

More Traffic Means More Congestion And Pollution

I live close to the Balls Pond Road, which increasingly seems to be a truck route across North London.

The Silvertown Tunnel will be two lanes each way; one for trucks and buses, and one for smaller vehicles.

I can’t see that pollution and congestion around the Silvertown Tunnel and on the routes to the tunnel, will not increase.

There Is Little Or No Provision For Cyclists And Pedestrians

This will be a big problem. Especially, as the local traffic in the area will increase dramatically.

Does Central London Have Enough Parking For The Increased Traffic?

Parking in Central London is probably close to capacity now!

So What Would I Do?

Given that construction has already started, I feel it is too late to cancel.

Better Alternatives Than Driving

I feel measures should be adopted that provide better alternatives than driving.

Obviously, this won’t help with trucks, but it could reduce the total number of vehicles going through the tunnel.

These could include.

  • Increase the frequency of trains on both the Lizzie Line and Thameslink.
  • Increase the number of destinations on both the Lizzie Line and Thameslink.
  • Add an extra car to Lizzie Line trains.
  • Remove First Class on the shorter eight-car Thameslink trains.
  • Add provision on some Lizzie Line and Thameslink routes for bicycles.
  • Add a Silvertown station to the Elizabeth Line for London City Airport.
  • Add one or more pedestrian and cycling bridges across the Thames.
  • Expand of the Docklands Light Railway.
  • Expand the Thames Clipper.
  • Connect Barking Riverside station to Thamesmead and Abbey Wood station either by a rail or a fast ferry.
  • Keep the cable-car.

I suspect there are other viable ideas.

Develop Incentives To Use Public Transport

Incentives could be in these areas.

  • Better station and bus terminals encourage more to use trains and buses.
  • Full free onboard wi-fi and phone charging.
  • Special fares for some journeys.

An example of the latter could be a discount for certain cross-river journeys.

Make The Silvertown Tunnel Available For Zero Carbon Vehicles Only

This would surely cut pollution in London.

Conclusion

We should use the Silvertown Tunnel to improve London’s air quality.

November 23, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

So Many Cases On A Train!

This afternoon about three, I went to West Ealing station to see what it was like to transfer between the Elizabeth Line Central Tunnel and the Western Branch at Paddington.

Coming back, I took an Elizabeth Line service that had started from Heathrow Airport and it was one of the busiest Lizzies, I’d ever ridden on!

To get on the train at West Ealing station, I got in to probably coach 4 of 9, as that was in the dry and the back end of the train I needed for Moorgate station was certainly in the wet.

I then had to walk half the length of the train to get to the back of the train.

It was not easy, as the train was full of scores of passengers with large wheelie cases.

This got me thinking.

Are Passengers Transferring To The Lizzie Line?

And especially those with large cases. that are the sort you could use for bringing in a pair of folded-up contortionists.

  • These cases don’t fit well on the Piccadilly Line, which has only a few step-free stations.
  • From what I’ve seen cases are easily wheeled to Elizabeth Line platforms at Heathrow.
  • Many of these cases won’t fit in the average family car.
  • All parking is expensive at Heathrow, whether it is short, medium or long.
  • Valet parking at Heathrow has been devalued by all the scam artists.
  • Taxis are the province of those that own oil wells, hedge funds or belong to the highest wunch of bankers.
  • Pick-up and drop-off is now very expensive.
  • There were a good proportion of couples, who were both dragging or pushing a massive case.
  • The Elizabeth Line is cheaper than the Heathrow Express.
  • The Elizabeth Line like the Piccadilly Line allows the use of a bank card as a ticket.
  • Only the Elizabeth and Piccadilly Lines take you direct to dozens of stations with only same-platform interchanges.
  • The Elizabeth Line has step-free interchanges with the Bakerloo, Circle, District, Hammersmith and City, Jubilee, and Metropolitan Lines, the Docklands Light Railway and the London Overground.
  • Whitechapel has been turned into a major transport hub for the Easternmost part of London.

There seems to be quite a few reasons why a traveller going to or from Heathrow might at least try the Elizabeth Line.

And travellers were doing it in droves today!

Were Upmarket Passengers Using The Lizzie Line?

Take the couple next to me on the train from West Ealing.

  • Around sixty.
  • Very well-dressed.
  • Possibly Mediterranean or South American.
  • Matching medium-size wheelie-cases.
  • She was wearing expensive glasses.

A couple of years ago, they would have used Heathrow Express.

They certainly weren’t the only passengers, who looked like Heathrow Express passengers.

Will The Lizzie Line Take Passengers From The Piccadilly Line?

As the cost will be the same, I suspect the answer will be yes.

Although, there will be groups of travellers, who will probably remain loyal to the Piccadilly Line.

If you were going to or from the step-free Cockfosters or Oakwood, with a heavy case, all the way on the Piccadilly Line could be a simple sensible option. I used to live near Oakwood station and remember several long trips on the Piccadilly Line, but not too Heathrow.

The step-free Kings Cross St. Pancras, Green Park, Knightsbridge and Earls Court may well have reasons to keep their regular passengers.

Those only travelling a few stops to or from Heathrow will probably stay with the Piccadilly Line for convenience.

Transport for London have been adding step-free access to the Heathrow Branch and this will surely promote use.

The Piccadilly Line is also getting new trains in a few years.

In Extending The Elizabeth Line – Piccadilly Line To Ealing Broadway, I talked about a proposal to turnback some Piccadilly Line trains at Ealing Broadway station.

I think it is a good idea, as it could make it simpler for Piccadilly Line passengers to access Heathrow and reduce congestion on the Piccadilly Line.

Will The Lizzie Line Take Passengers From The Heathrow Express?

This is an extract from Extending The Elizabeth Line – Piccadilly Line To Ealing Broadway

It will be difficult to predict what will happen to Heathrow Express, but I suspect several groups of passengers will desert it.

  • Passengers wanting to go anywhere East of Paddington without changing trains.
  • Passengers wanting any Elizabeth Line station.
  • Passengers, who don’t like the prices of Heathrow Express.
  • Passengers using Oyster or contactless cards.
  • Passengers who want to ride on London’s spectacular new Elizabeth Line.

After Old Oak Common station is opened for High Speed Two, the numbers could further decrease.

Will Heathrow Express survive?

Will The Lizzie Line Attract Passengers Who Usually Drive?

Large swathes of the country already have single-change step-free access to the Elizabeth Line.

  • All services out of Liverpool Street and/or Stratford.
  • All services out of Moorgate.
  • All Thameslink services through Farringdon.
  • All services out of Paddington.
  • All services through Abbey Wood.
  • When Crossrail to Ebbsfleet (C2E) opens, this will add all services through Gravesend and Ebbsfleet.
  • When High Speed Two opens, this will add all services through Old Oak Common.
  • When the Western Rail Approach To Heathrow is completed, this will add all services through Reading.

If you can get a train direct to the Elizabeth Line network and then a train direct to your terminal, would you seriously want all the hassle of parking after a two hour drive?

I can see parking at Heathrow suffering a severe lack of demand.

Conclusion

Lizzie will start a revolution in travel to and from Heathrow.

November 7, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

New Escalators At Bank Station To The Docklands Light Railway – 18th October 2022

In New Escalators At Bank Station Between The Northern Line And The DLR, I indicated that construction could be almost finished of the escalators that will connect the two lines.

The escalators have now opened.

Note.

  1. At the top of the escalators, you are delivered to a plaza, where the cross-tunnel between the two Northern Line platforms and the moving walkway to the Central Line meet.
  2. At the bottom of the escalators, you are in a wide passageway between the two DLR platforms.
  3. At the other end of the passageway, there are a pair of escalators that lead to Circle and District Line platforms and the Monument entrance to Bank station.

The escalators certainly open some faster pedestrian routes through the station.

October 18, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Battersea Power Station – 14th October 2022

I went to Battersea Power Station today and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. The picture of my jacket was taken in the toilet. All male toilets should have a hook for jackets.
  2. The crane is still in place.
  3. There are a number of shops still to open.
  4. There was no food store, although a Marks and Spencer’s food store is coming soon.
  5. The only place to have a coffee and cake and sit down was Starbucks. But I never eat in an American cafe or eat American food, as I don’t trust their gluten labelling.

One guy I met described it as Dubai without the sand.

I have some thoughts.

Getting There

There are two main routes.

  • Northern Line to Battersea Power Station station.
  • Thames Clipper to Battersea Power Station pier.

I went by the Northern line, changing both ways at Tottenham Court Road station to and from the Elizabeth Line.

  • This interchange is a short walk and step-free, if you use the lift.
  • There are no trains to Battersea Power Station on the Bank branch of the Northern Line.
  • There are five trains per hour (tph) to Battersea Power Station, with an extra two tph in the Peak.
  • There are no Night Tube trains to Battersea Power Station.

I can see this service being improved.

Arriving At Battersea Power Station By Underground

Punters were certainly arriving.

Gluten-Free Food

There was absolutely none, that I could find.

At least though a Gordon Ramsay restaurant is opening soon.

Signage

It wasn’t good. But then I have found several modern shopping centres work on this principle.

 

Conclusion

Canary Wharf is better.

  • Partly because the shops are more useful and to my taste.
  • But mainly because it is on the Elizabeth and Jubilee Lines, and the DLR.
  • All rail lines go through Canary Wharf rather than terminate there.

Battersea Power Station might be better, when the Northern Line is extended to Clapham Junction station.

 

 

October 14, 2022 Posted by | Food, World | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

New Escalators At Bank Station Between The Northern Line And The DLR

This picture shows the triple-barrelled escalator that runs between the Northern Line and the Docklands Light Railway.

Note.

  1. The digital clock was showing the right time.
  2. There are three escalators.
  3. Peering over the barrier, it looked to be that construction has almost  finished.

This visualisation shows the station.


Where was I standing when I took the picture?

The label at the top right says.

New entrance to Bank station on Cannon Street. Lifts and triple escalators to Northern Line and DLR.

The triple escalator leading down from the Cannon Street entrance to the Northern Line level is clearly visible.

  • It looks like passengers can go between the bottom of the escalators and both the Northbound and Southbound platforms of the Northern Line, using the cross-passage shown.
  • I suspect that the triple escalators to and from the DLR in-line with the escalators to the entrance.
  • Lifts would probably serve all three levels.

It is an intricate design, that looks like it minimises conflicting passenger routes, at the Cannon Street or Southern end of the station.

Move towards the North and you can see the moving walkway in a new tunnel parallel to the two Northern Line tracks, which connects to the Central Line.

At its Southern end, there is a spacious plaza.

  • It has two cross passages to the two Northern Line platforms.
  • It is a short walk to the moving walkway to and from the Central Line
  • It appears that on the Southern side, is the triple-escalator leading down to the DLR.

These pictures show this plaza and the connecting tunnels and escalators.

Note.

  1. The entrance to the tunnel with the moving walkway is opposite the escalators to the DLR.
  2. There are two cross-tunnels connecting the two Northern Line platforms and the plaza.
  3. All tunnels are wide.

It looks like pedestrian routes are as follows.

Cannon Street Entrance And Northern Line

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels.

Cannon Street Entrance And Docklands Light Railway

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels and a shorter escalator between the Northern and DLR levels.

Cannon Street Entrance And Central Line

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels, a walk to the moving walkway and the escalators to the Central Line.

Cannon Street Entrance And Waterloo And City Line

I suspect, this will use the new route to the DLR and then the existing route between the DLR and the Waterloo and City Line.

Northern Line And Central Line

The moving walkway and the escalators to the Central Line.

Northern Line And Docklands Light Railway

It looks like there are two-banks of three escalators between the Northern and DLR levels.

Northern Line And Waterloo And City Line

Not sure of this route, but it could be via the DLR.

Central Line And Docklands Light Railway

Via the moving walkway and escalators at both ends.

Central Line And Waterloo And City Line

As now?

Docklands Light Railway And Waterloo And City Line

As now?

Conclusion

It would be an ideal location for a chase thriller!

I can’t wait until it opens.

But I do believe that the moving walkway should be extended under the roads to Moorgate station.

 

October 5, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

HS2 Completes First Tunnel Cross Passages

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from High Speed Two.

This is the first paragraph.

As the tunnelling machines under the Chilterns approach the four-mile mark, HS2 completes the first of thirty-eight underground connections between the northbound and southbound tunnels.

This video from High Speed Two, shows the construction of the cross tunnels.

There appears to have been a resurgence of traditional tunneling methods, albeit it with the assistance of modern mechanised tools.

In London recently, these tunnels have been dug without the use of expensive tunnel boring machines.

  • The running and station tunnels for the Bank Station Upgrade.
  • The tunnel for the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link.

I suspect there will a lot more dug traditionally in the future.

Bank And Moorgate

The map from cartometro.com shows the plethora of lines at Moorgate and Bank stations.

Note.

  1. Moorgate station is served by the Circle, Elizabeth, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan, Northern and Northern City Lines.
  2. Bank station is served by the Central, Circle, District, Northern and Waterloo & City Lines.
  3. Bank station is also one terminus of the DLR.

I believe it would be possible to dig a long pedestrian tunnel with a travelator, between Moorgate and Bank stations under Moorgate, which connects the two stations.

City Thameslink Station And St. Paul’s

I discussed this in A Pedestrian Connection Between City Thameslink Station And St. Paul’s Tube Station.

August 30, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

TfL Advances Plans For DLR And Overground Extensions

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on New Civil Engineer.

This is the first paragraph.

Transport for London (TfL) has confirmed that it is moving ahead with plans to extend the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) and the West London Orbital (WLO), part of the London Overground.

So it appears that despite all their financial problems, some progress is being made.

The Docklands Light Railway Extension To Thamesmead

I first wrote about this project in TfL Considering Extending DLR As Far As Abbey Wood.

Now it appears that TfL has been working with Homes England and the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities on a feasibility study for the extension.

I would like to see this extension incorporation the following.

  • A signature bridge over the Thames with good views of the river.
  • A station with a convenient connection to Crossness, which could become one of major London’s tourist attractions with better transport links.
  • A connection to the Elizabeth Line at Abbey Wood station.

It could help to level up Thamesmead, whose main claim to fame is that it was where the violent film Clockwork Orange was made.

The West London Orbital Railway

I have written extensively about this railway and you can see my posts here.

This map from the Mayor’s Transport Strategy shows the route.

I believe this railway could do the following.

  • Level-up much of North-West London.
  • Provide better access to Heathrow.
  • Link West London to High Speed Two and the Elizabeth Line.

It would also provide better links to Brentford’s new stadium.

The New Civil Engineer says this about funding.

TfL now confirms that the West London Alliance has commissioned feasibility work for the scheme. Meanwhile, TfL is considering options for a Borough Community Infrastructure Levy to help pay for it and has been investigating development opportunities on the route that could unlock funds via Section 106 planning obligations and Carbon Offset funding.

Conclusion

It does appear there are ways and means to fund these schemes, without expecting the rest of the UK to fund London’s transport network.

June 18, 2022 Posted by | Finance, Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Using The Elizabeth Line Between London City And Heathrow Airports

Today, I went from London City Airport to Heathrow using the Docklands Light Railway, the underground section of the Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express.

London City Airport And Poplar Stations

I took these pictures on this section of the route using the Docklands Light Railway.

Note.

  1. I started my journey at 13:15.
  2. I arrived at Poplar at 13:27.
  3. The journey took twelve minutes, which agrees with the timetable.

This is a route, that gives a view of London’s rebuilding in the East.

Poplar And Canary Wharf Stations

I walked this section.

Note.

  1. I started my walk from Poplar station at 13:27.
  2. I was on the platform at Canary Wharf station at 13:39.
  3. I used a lift at Poplar station and the escalators at Canary Wharf station.
  4. The walk took twelve minutes, but it was a roundabout route.
  5. It looks like a level walkway is to be built between the two stations.

This Google Map shows the are between the two stations.

Note.

  1. Poplar station in the North-East of the map.
  2. The bridge at Poplar station, that provides the route I took over Aspen Way.
  3. After crossing the bridge and using the lift, I walked along the South side of Aspen Way.
  4. I then walked South down the path at the East side of the site, where it appears from the hoardings, flats will be built.
  5. Finally, I turned left to walk along the dock and then right to cross into Canary Wharf station.

Work appears to have started at Canary Wharf on the Southern end of an extended walkway, that will link to the bridge over Aspen Way.

This direct route could be nearly two hundred metres shorter and would shorten the connection by several minutes.

Canary Wharf And Paddington Stations

This section of the journey took nineteen minutes and I arrived at Paddington at 13:58, as this picture shows.

It had taken forty-three minutes between London City Airport and Paddington stations.

Paddington And Heathrow Airport By Heathrow Express

I took the 14:10 Heathrow Express to the Airport and took these pictures.

Note.

  1. It took about six minutes to walk between the Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express.
  2. This was my first ride on Heathrow Express, since the service has started using Class 387 trains.
  3. The trains are fine, but where are the tables, that I like so much in the other Class 387 trains?
  4. The train arrived at Heathrow Central at 14:29.

This meant my journey between the two airports had taken an hour and fourteen minutes.

Canary Wharf to Heathrow using Heathrow Express and the Elizabeth Line had taken thirty-four minutes.

Return To Paddington On The Elizabeth Line

I came back from Heathrow on an Elizabeth Line train, which took 29 minutes.

That would mean that today using the Elizabeth Line to Heathrow.

  • Heathrow and Canary Wharf will take 48 minutes.
  • Heathrow and London City Airport will take one hour and twenty-nine minutes.

The difference in time between the two trains is solely down to the times of the Heathrow Express and the Elizabeth Line trains between Paddington and Heathrow.

What Difference Will A Direct Elizabeth Line Connection Make?

Canary Wharf are giving a figure of thirty-nine minutes between Canary Wharf and Heathrow, when the Elizabeth Line fully opens.

This would appear to indicate that fully opening the Elizabeth Line connection at Paddington will save nine minutes and the Elizabeth Line will only be a few minutes slower than Heathrow Express, if you can cut out the change at Paddington.

This table compares times between Canary Wharf and Heathrow.

  • Elizabeth Line with a change at Paddington – 48 minutes
  • Elizabeth Line and Heathrow Express with a change at Paddington – 34 minutes
  • Elizabeth Line direct – 39 minutes

How many passengers will swap from Heathrow Express to a complete Elizabeth Line?

Is There Going To Be A Pedestrian Bridge Between Poplar And Canary Wharf Stations?

This Google Map shows the bridge that leads South from Canary Wharf station.

Note how the bridge could have been designed to go through the station to the housing to the North and perhaps ultimately to Poplar DLR station.

These pictures show the complete bridge on the South side and what could be the start of construction on the North side.

Note.

  1. This pictures were taken on two dates.
  2. A full bridge would connect the new housing to the shopping centre and the Jubilee Line station.
  3. Between Poplar and Canary Wharf stations would be around 120 metres.
  4. There would be a straight and level walking route between Poplar DLR station and the two Canary Wharf Jubilee and Elizabeth Line stations.
  5. A short branch would lead to Canary Wharf DLR station.
  6. Stairs would lead to the buses that run through Canary Wharf.

It does appear that the North and South bridges will form a continuous straight route.

The bridge would create a comprehensive transport interchange for East London.

 

 

 

 

June 16, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts On London City Airport And The Elizabeth Line

One of the reasons for going to Woolwich today, which I wrote about in A Walk Around Woolwich – 15th June 2022, was to get a feel on what is the best way to go between London City and Heathrow airports.

There are three routes, where only a single change is needed.

  • DLR – Change at Stratford – Elizabeth Line – Will be available later in 2022.
  • DLR – Change at Woolwich Arsenal – Elizabeth Line
  • DLR – Change at Poplar/Canary Wharf – Elizabeth Line – Will be improved.

Note.

  1. All are easy step-free interchanges, with the change at Stratford probably the easiest.
  2. The change at Woolwich is probably the longest walk.

All trains from London City Airport station, have a single change for Heathrow.

  • Bank – Change at Poplar/Canary Wharf
  • Stratford – Change at Stratford
  • Woolwich Arsenal – Change at Woolwich Arsenal

It would appear that those not afraid of a moderate walk, should take the first train from London City Airport, if they want to go to Heathrow.

This table shows routes to common destinations from London City Airport.

  • Bank – DLR
  • Battersea Power Station – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Canary Wharf – DLR – Change at Poplar – DLR
  • Clapham Junction – DLR – Change at Shadwell – East London Line
  • Croydon – DLR – Change at Shadwell – East London Line
  • Crystal Palace – DLR – Change at Shadwell – East London Line
  • Euston – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Heathrow – DLR – Change at Custom House – Elizabeth Line
  • King’s Cross – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Liverpool Street – DLR – Change at Bank – Central Line
  • London Bridge – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Moorgate – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Paddington – DLR – Change at Custom House – Elizabeth Line
  • St. Pancras – DLR – Change at Bank – Northern Line
  • Victoria – DLR – Change at Bank – District/Circle Line
  • Waterloo – DLR – Change at Bank – Waterloo and City Line

Note.

  1. The interchange improvements at Bank station, will open up new routes to and from London City Airport.
  2. If the walking route from Poplar and Canary Wharf station is improved, this will be a valuable upgrade.
  3. The Elizabeth Line will run at frequencies of at least twelve trains per hour (tph) on all sections, so you won’t have to wait more than five minutes for a train.

With these upgrades London City Airport will be a more accessible airport.

 

 

June 16, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , | 3 Comments

A Walk Around Woolwich – 15th June 2022

I went to Woolwich station on the Elizabeth Line today and had a walk around.

Note.

  1. Woolwich station is a simple station with only three escalators at one end direct to the platforms, which are in a tunnel.
  2. Both platforms have platform edge doors and a similar decor to some platforms on the Jubilee Line Extension.
  3. The escalator shaft and the booking hall are lined in brick.
  4. Next to the station is a very large Marks & Spencer Food store.
  5. Outside the station is large green with a pub on one side.
  6. Over the top of the station are a lot of flats.

Is this the way that modern housing developments should be designed? It’s certainly better than some I’ve seen.

It’s certainly come on a lot, since I wrote Exploring The Woolwich Station Box, which has a gallery of what the station looked like in February 2013.

The Woolwich Foot Tunnel

My walk continued under the Thames, through the Woolwich foot tunnel.

It was the first time I’d used this tunnel.

On the other side, I got a bus to London City Airport, from where I got the Docklands Light Railway back to Woolwich Arsenal and then walked back to the Elizabeth Line station to come home.

I Doubt I’ll Use The Marks & Spencer At Woolwich Much!

The store was not designed in a way I liked.

  • Many of the goods, were behind glass doors, which meant I needed three hands to put items in my basket.
  • There weren’t many staff in the store.
  • It was difficult finding the goods I needed.
  • It was all self-service tills of the type I didn’t like.

These may be only personal preferences, but then there must be many like me who have a gammy hand for some reason.

It’s a pity really, as it is such a convenient location for a store. The only other M & S store close to the Elizabeth Line is the one at Paddington, which I use regularly.

June 15, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments