The Anonymous Widower

The Power Of Solar With A Large Battery

This post is based on this press release from Highview Power, which is entitled Highview Enlasa Developing 50MW/500MWh Liquid Air Energy Storage Facility In The Atacama Region Of Chile.

This is the first paragraph.

Highview Enlasa, the 50/50 joint venture between Highview Power, a global leader in long duration energy storage solutions, and Energía Latina S.A.-Enlasa, the largest backup power generation provider in Chile, is pleased to announce that it is developing the first liquid air long duration energy storage project in Chile. This 50MW/500MWh (10 hours) CRYOBattery™, which represents an estimated investment of USD $150 million, will be located in Diego de Almagro in the Atacama Region.

Ican deduce these points from this paragraph.

The power output of 50 MW appears to be standard for all of Highview Power’s CRYOBatteries, which is not surprising as the centre of each system appears to be a standard turbomachinery solution from MAN Energy Solutions, as I wrote about in MAN Energy Partners With Highview Power On Liquid-Air Energy-Storage Project.

But whereas the first system at Carrington, near Manchester, can only store 250 MWh, this plant in Chile is twice the size and can provide 50 MW of electricity for ten hours. The Chile plant will just have twice the number of storage tanks for liquid air.

I can no reason, why if Carrington needed to store more electricity, that more tanks couldn’t be added.

This Google Map shows the area around the city of Diego de Almagro.

Note.

  1. The city of Diego de Almagro is in the centre of the map.
  2. In the North-Western corner is the Planta Fotovoltaica ENEL Diego de Almagro, which even my rudimentary Spanish, identifies as a solar power plant.
  3. In the North-Eastern corner of the map, is appears that a second solar power plant is under construction.

The city is surrounded by the large Atacama Desert.

This second Google Map shows the location of Diego de Almagro, with respect to the Chilean Coast.

Note.

  1. The red arrow indicates the solar powerplant at Diego de Almagro.
  2. La Paz in Bolivia is in the North-East corner of the map.
  3. The sandy-beige colour indicates the Atacama Desert.

The area would appear not to lack sun.

This extract is from the press release.

With one of the highest solar irradiations in the world, the Atacama Region has the potential to generate all the country’s electricity. By pairing solar with cryogenic energy storage, Chile can benefit from 24/7, 100% renewable energy.

The Wiukipedia entry for Solar Power In Chile, is not as optimistic as the press release, but does show the rapid growth in the amount of solar power.

Conclusion

Solar power installed with large batteries, will transform the electricity supply in countries like Australia, Chile and India and those in Africa and other places, where there are large hot deserts.

In Europe, Spain is investing heavily in solar power and is a big innovator in solar technology.

 

 

July 1, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Could West Africa Become A Green Energy Powerhouse?

I ask this question, because I have just read this article on Hydrogen Fuel News, which is entitled Green Hydrogen Potential Causes Germany to court West African countries.

The article has this sub-title.

Nations in that part of Africa have the capacity to meet 1500 times Germany’s 2030 H2 demand.

That would appear to be a massive amount of hydrogen.

This extract from the article, talks about energy production.

Initial results for the 15 West African Economic Area (ECOAS) countries revealed that a massive three quarters of West African land is appropriate for wind turbines. Moreover, the electricity production from wind energy in the region costs about half the amount it would in Germany.

Additionally, solar power systems can also be economically operated on about one third of the West African region.

Add in a few large electrolysers and you have the hydrogen.

The hydrogen can be transported to Germany by tanker, either as hydrogen or ammonia.

The German strategy is to be underpinned by education, as this extract explains.

In support of developing West African green hydrogen production, a new master’s graduate program on clean H2 technology will begin in September. The purpose of the program will be to train local green hydrogen scientific specialists. The first three waves of the program are expected to train about 180 students attending four universities in Côte d’Ivoire, Togo, Senegal, and Niger.

Perhaps the Commonwealth should do something similar in West African countries like Gambia, Ghana, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

After all many parts of Australia have very similar climate and population densities and probably energy generation potential to large parts of West Africa.

The Geographical Advantage

It should also be noted that geographically West Africa is close to Europe by ship.

There are no pinch points like the Suez Canal

As the European hydrogen gas network grows, the journey will get shorter.

Does anybody know how long it would take a tanker to go between say Accra in Ghana to Rotterdam?

Conclusion

I would see four main benefits coming to West Africa.

  • Electricity for all.
  • Employment to support the new industries.
  • Hydrogen to power transport.
  • The value of all those exports.

Hopefully, the standard of living of all those in West Africa would improve.

 

May 26, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Highview Power Unveils $1bn Of Liquid-Air Energy Storage Projects In Spain

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Recharge Magazine.

The article is based on this press release from Highview Power, which is entitled Highview Power Developing 2 GWh of Liquid Air Long Duration Energy Storage Projects in Spain.

This is the introductory paragraph from the press release.

Highview Power, a global leader in long duration energy storage solutions, announced today it is developing up to 2 GWh of long duration, liquid air energy storage projects across Spain for an estimated investment of around $1 billion. These projects will enable several Spanish regions to move towards their net zero emissions target.

The press release also says this about location and size.

Highview Power is planning to develop up to seven CRYOBattery™ projects ranging from 50 MW/300 MWh in Asturias, Cantabria, Castilla y Leon, and the Canary Islands.

Three of these areas are in Northern Spain and the other is a group of islands.

As Spain has at least two large pumped storage systems, perhaps geography rules this proven technology out in these areas.

System Modularity 

According to the Wikipedia entry for Highview Power, the two current CRYOBatteries under development are sized as follows.

  • Carrington, Manchester, UK – 50 MW/250 MWh – Under construction
  • Vermont, USA – 50 MW/400 MWh – Under development

Do the figures indicate that several systems will share the same 50 MW core power system, with a number of liquid air tanks to give the appropriate capacity?

I have extensively modelled chemical plants in my past to see, how different sizes work and I am fairly certain, that Highview Power have developed a design, that is extremely flexible.

It looks like if initial calculations show that a system capable of supplying 50 MW for five hours is needed, but operation proves that a capacity of six hours would be better, that all Highview Power need to do is add another 50 MWh tank.

This is surely an operator’s dream, as if say a developer builds a thousand dwellings and/or a windfarm nearby and more energy storage is needed, an appropriate number of extra tanks can be added.

Sourcing The 50 MW Core Power System

I talked about how the first system at Carrington will use a system from MAN Energy Solutions in MAN Energy Partners With Highview Power On Liquid-Air Energy-Storage Project.

This surely is an approach that minimises risk.

Sourcing The Storage Tanks

I have been searching the Internet for manufacturers of cryogenic gas tanks and I’ve found them in countries like Australia, Brazil, Germany, India, South Africa, Spain, the UK and the US.

But then most hospitals have one for their liquid oxygen.

This image was from shutterstock.

They are not difficult to find.

Spain And Renewable Energy

Spain is a large producer of renewable energy and also a leader in wind and solar power technology.

See Renewable Energy in Spain on Wikipedia for more details.

Siemens Gamesa, which was created by a merger of a German and a Spanish company and is headquartered at Zamudio in Spain,  have also developed the Siemens Gamesa ETES, which is a volcanic rock-based energy storage system about the same size of Highview Power’s CRYOBattery.

Conclusion

It looks to me, that Highview Power have closed a good sale.

May 20, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , | 4 Comments

ScottishPower’s Green Hydrogen Project Looks To Build UK’s Largest Electrolyser

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Current News.

This is the first paragraph.

ScottishPower has submitted a planning application for the UK’s largest electrolyser as part of the Green Hydrogen for Scotland project.

Other points from the article include, these about the electrolyser.

  • It will be built close to the Whitelee wind farm.
  • It will be 20 MW.
  • It will produce eight tonnes of green hydrogen per day.
  • The electrolyser will be built by ITM Power in Rotherham.
  • It is hoped that green hydrogen will be produced by 2030.

Other points include.

  • The windfarm will be backed up by 40MW of solar panels and a battery capable of supplying 50 MW.
  • The capacity and type of the battery is not stated.

The article finishes with a must-read section, about how hydrogen will help the UK meet its decarbonisation targets.

April 13, 2021 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Solar Canals Already Competitive With Ground-Mounted PV

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on PV Magazine.

This is the introductory paragraph.

U.S. researchers have assessed the technical and economic feasibility of solar canals in California and have found that their LCOE is already close to that of ground-mounted solar plants. Three different project configurations were analyzed for eight different sites across the California network of canals.

It is a fascinating concept and is already been tried in India.

But apparently, California has the world’s largest network of canals.

Unlike the French system of Floatovoltaics, which I wrote about in Understanding Floatovoltaics, they don’t float the panels on the water, but suspend them with cables or trusses.

But like the French system, they do cut down evaporation.

March 24, 2021 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | 1 Comment

Morocco Could Produce Up To 4% Of World’s Green Hydrogen By 2030

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Morocco World News.

This is the first paragraph.

Morocco could produce up to 4% of the global demand for green hydrogen by 2030, according to the German Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development.

They are aiming to produce 10,000 tonnes of hydrogen per year by 2025.

Wikipedia has an informative topic called Energy Policy in Morocco, which indicates the following.

  • The country has little oil and gas reserves. Although it does have some oil shale, that could be developed.
  • Wind, solar and hydro power are being developed.
  • They could install a nuclear power station East of Rabat.

It sounds, that they could have an electricity structure, that would be ideal for the production of green hydrogen.

Conclusion

Morocco could be joining an ever growing club, which includes Australia, Saudi Arabia and Spain, who will produce hydrogen for export to countries like Germany, Japan and South Korea.

March 15, 2021 Posted by | Hydrogen | , , , , , | 1 Comment

New Form Of Solar Energy To Enter US Market

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on abc News.

This is the first few paragraphs.

Organic energy is getting a jolt with the launch of GO-OPV’s ORENgE system in North America.

Organic energy uses a thin film panel to capture the sun’s rays and converts it to power, similar to traditional solar power.

The panels could be used for windows or trucks, phone or computer chargers, or it can be a building-integrated photovoltaics in glass.

This sounds good to me!

My South-facing windows make air-conditioning a must in my house.

But my air-conditioning broke in 2018 and no-one has been able to fix it!

This technology would sort it out in a trice!

Conclusion

This is technology to watch.

December 20, 2020 Posted by | Energy | , , , | 1 Comment

Will The United States Be The Largest Battery In The World?

This article on Renewables Now is entitled Swell Bags Funds For 200 MWh Of Distributed Energy Storage In VPPs.

This is the introductory paragraph.

US distributed energy and grid solutions provider Swell Energy Inc has secured financial backing for up to USD 450 million (EUR 370.6m) worth of virtual power plants (VPPs) to be deployed across the country.

200 MWh a lot of energy storage and it works out at around $450,000 per MWh.

But it was the last paragraph that caught my eye.

Swell expects distributed energy systems in its portfolio to generate more than 3,000 GW over the next 20 years and customers to potentially store 1,000 GWh for later use.

If that should be 3,000 GWh, that will be 150 GWh per year. By comparison Drax, which is the largest power station in the UK, can generate 34,689.6 GWh in a year.

Drax may be 230 times bigger in GWh per year, but the US numbers are impressive and as wind and solar develop in the country, I suspect the United States will become the largest battery in the world.

Watch the US renewable energy sector grow!

December 15, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , | 1 Comment

This Material Can Store The Sun’s Energy For Months, Maybe Even Years

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Anthropocene.

This is the sub-title.

Thin coatings of the material could soak up sun in summer months and provide heat to buildings in winter, all without using fuel or electricity.

This sounds like something to file under Too Good To Be True.

But the research does come from the University of Lancaster and uses a type of material called a metal-organic framework.

Conclusion

Increasingly, it seems to me, that we’re seeing lots of outstanding chemistry coming to the fore.

 

December 11, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , | 1 Comment

Battery Life: The Race To Find A Storage Solution For A Green Energy Future

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Financial Times.

It is a long article, that gives a good review of the technologies available to store energy from wind and solar power.

It gives a lot more details and an image of the Siemens Gamesa hot rock energy storage system in Hamburg.

  • It uses a thousand tonnes of volcanic rock.
  • It can store 130 MWh of electricity.

The system has apparently been designed to re-use the turbines from closing coal-fired power stations, which is an innovative idea.

 

November 23, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage | , , , | Leave a comment