The Anonymous Widower

The Britons Who Played For The Moon

The title of this post, is the same as that of an article on page 15 of today’s copy of The Times.

This is two paragraphs – – .

The team was organised by John Hodge, who was born in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex and who had previously worked for Vickers Armstrong, which during the Second World War built the Supermarine Spitfire.

Mr. Hodge, now 90, would become a flight director at mission control – the one time that ‘Houston’ spoke with a British accent.

I’ve heard of John before.

Like me, John Hodge went to Minchenden Grammar School and one of our maths’ teachers; George Bullen,when I was doing Further Maths in the Sixth Form, told us the full story of one of his brightest students.

If John had a problem, it was that he couldn’t get a language O-level, which was needed to get to University in the late 1940s.

So he went to Northampton Engineering College, which is now the City University, where the qualification wasn’t needed.

I think George Bullen, with his John Arlott Hampshire accent, probably told us the story of John Hodge for motivation.

This is another paragraph in the article.

Peter Armitage, 90, who grew up in Hable-le-Rice, Hampshire, was also in the Avro group. In 1969 he oversaw the simulator that Neil Armstrong used to learn how to touch down on the moon.

As I remember it, the simulator was a hybrid digital-analogue computer using two PACE 231-R computers as the analogue half.

This picture shows the similar computer, that I worked on at ICI in Welwyn Garden City.

These machines could each solve up to a hundred simultaneous differential equations, in real time, so were ideal for calculating the dynamics of complex systems.

They were some beasts!

From what I read at the time, they were key in bringing the Apollo 13 astronauts home, as they could be quickly reprogrammed, if you were familiar with the dynamic model., as undoubtedly NASA’s engineers were.

 

 

July 17, 2019 - Posted by | Computing | , , ,

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