The Anonymous Widower

Apology After Woman Dragged On Platform By London Overground Train

The title of this post, is the same as that as this article on the BBC.

These first three paragraphs describe the incident.

An investigation has been launched after a woman attempting to board a London Overground train was dragged along a platform.

The passenger tried to board the train at Wood Street Station in Walthamstow, north-east London, on 14 January when her hand got trapped in the door.

The Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) said she was then forced to run alongside the train for about 20m (66ft), before the train stopped. The woman was uninjured.

I don’t know Wood Street station or the size, shape and agility of the lady, who had the near accident.

I shall be going to have a look.

I took these pictures at Wood Street station, this afternoon.

These are my observations.

  1. The platforms have a very pronounced curve, which makes the gap between train and platform wider.
  2. There is a significant difference in the height of the train floor and the station platform, which makes the gap effectively wider.
  3. All the passengers getting into the train were men and wearing sensible shoes. I was too!
  4. There is a warning message about doors closing thirty seconds before the train leaves. I’ve never seen one before on the Overground.

I will not speculate on what caused the accident, except to say, that as the passenger wasn’t badly injured, I suspect we’ll get to the truth of what happened.

January 31, 2022 - Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , ,

6 Comments »

  1. Déjà vu
    “Report 12/2016: Passenger accident at Hayes & Harlington station – GOV.UK” https://www.gov.uk/government/news/report-122016-passenger-accident-at-hayes-harlington-station
    but you’ve been to Hayes and Harrington?

    Comment by fammorris | January 31, 2022 | Reply

  2. This incident was probably a Class 165 train. Do they have sensitive door edges?

    There was also the death in Liverpool.

    Comment by AnonW | January 31, 2022 | Reply

    • Class 165s swing plug doors which at least by 2017 didn’t have any form of sensitive edge as is the case with the Class 378s sliding pocket doors. That said, in incident reports on London Overground there have been plenty of cases of passenger complaint and items getting stuck in doors.
      You prompted me to look back at situation of Class 165 doors. Back in 2013 a response by ORR to RAIB’s report on passenger related incidents and one on Class 365 at Kings Cross showed how a perceived slow industry reaction can conflict with the desire by ORR for rapid amendments to door safety. At the time IFE, the Knorr-Bremse company responsible for the doors proposed a sensitive edge modification that was as valid to Classes 465 and 165. This solution was considered complex requiring trains to be removed from traffic and modified during major overhaul. As a result Rail Door Solutions an independent UK company were tasked with coming up with an alternative solution.
      According to the later RAIB 2017 report of the Hayes and Harrington incident, accidents were still possible.
      I’ve had two incidents, the first of which occurred about 20 years ago on the District Line when my arm got trapped in the door with a heavy briefcase outside the train. It took about 10 metres for the train to stop and for my arm to release. In 2016 I tripped getting onto a Piccadilly Line train at Acton Town and ended up with my foot trapped outside the train. On this occasion traction dropped out almost immediately.
      Working, as I was at LUL’s Railway Engineering Works in Acton, I asked some of the people who knew about sensitive edges. It was clear that there could be some deviation from TfL’s specification of 2.75 +/- 0.25s between chime and door closure. As a result I found myself timing the variation on the alternative routes back to Waterloo involving Piccadilly, Bakerloo, District and Northern Lines. Back then there generally were significant differences between Piccadilly and Bakerloo lines.

      Comment by fammorris | January 31, 2022 | Reply

      • The incident at Wood Street would have involved a Class 710 train. I have heard reports, that Aventras tend to accelerate fast and tend to get ahead of schedule.

        Comment by AnonW | January 31, 2022

      • I stand corrected. No statistics but blogs say 710s accelerate faster than 378s. Also 710 has sliding plug doors as per much of mainline stock, but as I’ve already said that not necessarily an encumbrance to sensitive door edges.

        Comment by fammorris | January 31, 2022

      • I stand corrected. No statistics but blogs say 710s accelerate faster than 378s. Also 710 has sliding plug doors as per much of mainline stock, but as I’ve already said that’s not necessarily an encumbrance to sensitive door edges.

        Comment by fammorris | January 31, 2022


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