The Anonymous Widower

Roaming Around East Anglia – What Trains Will Run On The East-West Rail Link?

In my discussions at Newmarket and as I passed through stations like Ipswich, Norwich and Stowmarket, I got to thinking what type and size of train will be used by the East-West Rail Link.

Bi-Mode Trains

The trains will undoubtedly be some form of bi-mode train, as electrification of the whole route has been ruled out.

But the ability to use electrification would undoubtedly be useful, as parts of the route and some stations already have 25 KVAC overhead wires.

  • Reading to Didcot
  • Milton Keynes to Bletchley
  • Around Bedford
  • Around Sandy
  • Cambridge North to Cambridge
  • Around Norwich
  • Haughley Junction to Manngtree

With a few other sections likely to be electrified, I suspect that automated pantograph control would be useful.

Operating Speed

Wikipedia states this about the operating speed of the Western section.

In May 2014, Network Rail announced that the line will be opened to 125 mph (200 km/h) running, the current top speed for InterCity services. It is proposed that CrossCountry services, along with Chiltern Railways and London Northwestern Railway services will use the route.

If it is a 125 mph line in places, then surely the trains will have this speed capability.

The 125 mph East-West Rail Link would also open up some fast 125 mph routes, from the South West and South Wales to the East Coast Main Line.

Train Length

The following stations East of Cambridge will be seved by East-West Rail Link trains.

  • A14 Parkway
  • Attleborough
  • Brandon
  • Bury St. Edmunds *
  • Cambridge *
  • Cambridge North *
  • Dullingham
  • Ely *
  • Elmswell
  • Ipswich *
  • Kennett
  • Manningtree *
  • Needham Market *
  • Newmarket
  • Norwich *
  • Stowmarket *
  • Thetford
  • Thrston
  • Wymondham

I am fairly sure that stations marked with an asterisk can already take trains with at least eight cars.

It doesn’t appear that there are any stations to the East off Cambridge, that will have a serious restriction on train length.

I would suspect that five, six or eight cars will be used.

I would also suspect that all platforms would be capable of taking two hundred metre long trains. London Overground was caught out, by making the initial platform length too short and it would be tragic, if the East West Rail Consortium made the same mistake.

Will The Trains Be Walk-Through?

The first long-distance walk-through trains will start to appear this year.

As they offer more passenger space, I think that the trains will be walk-through.

Conclusion

I am pretty sure that the trains for the East-West Rail Link will be 125 mph-capable bi-modes of whatever length the East West Rail Consortium thinks is needed.

Consider.

  • Many of the Eastern stations already take two hundred metre trains.
  • Reading and possibly Oxford can take two five-car Class 800 trains, which have a length of 260 metres.
  • Intermediate stations like Bedford, Cambridge and Milton Keynes all have long platforms.
  • Other stations will be newly built or like Newmarket will need rebuilding of the platforms.

I think we might see the East-West Rail Consortium, buying the longest trains, they could possibly need.

Trains from the Hitachi Class 800-family must be in the running for the order, but I feel that this order could be ideal for the 125 mph bi-mode Aventra with batteries, which has been proposed to Cross-Country. I wrote about this train in Bombardier Bi-Mode Aventra To Feature Battery Power.

 

March 3, 2019 - Posted by | Transport | , ,

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