The Anonymous Widower

Elizabeth Line – Paddington Bakerloo Line Link – 24th May 2022

These pictures show the Elizabeth Line end of the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link.

Note.

  1. This pedestrian tunnel connects the Elizabeth Line platforms and the Bakerloo Line platforms at Paddington station.
  2. The tunnel runs under the main pedestrian concourse of Paddington station from one side to the other.
  3. At the start of construction, I wrote about this tunnel in Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Project, London.

In Paddington Is Operational Again, I showed this image, that I found on the web.

The Bakerloo Line Link At Paddington

I also said this.

It looks to be a very well thought out link.

  • It is connected to the Crossrail station by escalators and lifts in the middle of the island platform at that station.
  • The connection at the Bakerloo Line end, would appear to have lifts, stairs and escalators.
  • Wll the lifts go direct to the surface as well?
  • All routes seem to be direct to the central landing in the Bakerloo Line platforms.
  • It may be a hundred and sixty five metres, but the design probably means most passengers will do it fairly fast.But I’m only speculating.

It will certainly be a very powerful interchange, as it will give a much needed connection to London’s least-developed Underground Line.

Having seen one end today, I agree with my statement in the previous post.

Walking The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link

On the 26th May, I walked the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link from the Elizabeth Line to the Bakerloo Line platforms.

Note.

  1. There are two escalators and a lift at both ends.
  2. It appears to be a level walk. Walking the contours around a hill is always easier.
  3. There are two seats at one third and two thirds distance. Do the seats have a mobile phone hotspot?
  4. The seats make each section fifty-five metres, as the tunnel is 165 metres long.
  5. According to this page on the BRE Group web site, it cost just £40 million.
  6. There is a handrail all the way in the middle of the link.
  7. Each direction, is wide enough for the largest pram, wheelchair or stretcher.

 

The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link has set a high gold standard for below ground pedestrian links.

  • Both ends have escalators and lifts to provide step-free access between platforms and the tunnel.
  • The tunnel is level.
  • There is a handrail.
  • The tunnel is wide.
  • The tunnel has seats for those who need a rest.
  • There are help points.
  • Most importantly, at only £40 million it was not expensive.

Several other long pedestrian links in London, the UK, Europe and the world could borrow ideas from this link, which I would rate as the best I’ve ever seen.

Does The Paddington Bakerloo Line Link Make The Bakerloo Line A North-South Cross-Branch Of The Elizabeth Line?

The Elizabeth Line has these major North-South cross-branches.

  • Jubilee Line at Bond Street station.
  • Charing Cross Branch of the Northern Line at Tottenham Court Road station.
  • Thameslink at Farringdon station.
  • Bank Branch of the Northern Line at Moorgate station.
  • East London Line of the Overground at Whitechapel station.

With the opening of the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link, another North-South cross-branch of the Elizabeth Line been added.

It could be argued that London has a new NW-SE high frequency link between Harrow & Wealdstone and Abbey Wood stations.

  • Bakerloo Line – Harrow & Wealdstone and Paddington
  • Paddington Bakerloo Line Link – 165 metre level step-free walk
  • Elizabeth Line – Paddington and Abbey Wood via Whitechapel and Canary Wharf

The journey would appear to take 73 minutes from the National Rail journey planner, which allows fifteen minutes for the change at Paddington.

Is The Bakerloo Line Extension Still Needed?

So how long would it take for journeys from Harrow & Wealdstone to selected stations, that could be served by the Bakerloo Line Extension.

  • New Cross Gate – 82 minutes – Change at Paddington and Whitechapel
  • Lewisham – 93 minutes – Change at Paddington and Canary Wharf
  • Hayes – 98 minutes – Change at Paddington, Whitechapel and New Cross

Note.

  1. Going South the Hayes train arrives at New Cross, just after the train from Dalston Junction has arrived.
  2. I also feel with some Northbound improvements on the Overground service times could be shortened.
  3. Locations on the Old Kent Road might be better served by frequent buses between Elephant & Castle and New Cross stations.

Improving the Overground and the fast link between Whitechapel and Paddington may allow the Bakerloo Line Extension to be kicked into the long grass.

Wi-Fi And 4G

This page on the TfL web site is entitled Everything You Need To Know About The Elizabeth Line, where this is said about Wi-Fi and 4G.

WiFi access within the tunnels will be introduced later in 2022. Customers on both trains and platforms will have access to 4G connectivity this year too.

Will passengers be more likely to take a route through London with Wi-Fi and 4G?

I very much feel they will and that this will draw more passengers to use the Elizabeth Line.

And once, they start to use it, they’ll keep with it, so long as they’re happy.

Conclusion

The Bakerloo Line Extension can be kicked into the long grass.

May 24, 2022 - Posted by | Design, Transport/Travel | , , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. The Elizabeth line is run by TFL so I wonder how far you can go towards either end on a Senior Citizen Freedom pass? I can’t see anything on the freedom pass web site, in fact their maps are many years out-of-date and couldn’t find anything on the TFL.gov site either.

    Comment by Maurice Reed | May 24, 2022 | Reply

    • I’m fairly certain, you can go all the way. So today, I went between Abbey Wood and Paddington on mine.

      Comment by AnonW | May 24, 2022 | Reply

  2. […] The Paddington Bakerloo Link Link is another level down. See Elizabeth Line – Paddington Bakerloo Line Link – 24th May 2022. […]

    Pingback by Elizabeth Line – Paddington Station – 24th May 2022 « The Anonymous Widower | May 24, 2022 | Reply

  3. The map shown in the link is published by the Rail Delivery Group and is dated May 2022 and illustrates the geographical extent of the Freedom Pass https://www.londoncouncils.gov.uk/services/freedom-pass/using-pass/freedom-pass-travel-map

    Comment by fammorris | May 24, 2022 | Reply


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