The Anonymous Widower

The Route Of High Speed Two Into Birmingham

This map clipped from the High Speed Two web site, shows the route of the line to its terminus in Birmingham Curzon Street station.

 

Note.

  1. Birmingham Curzon Street station is indicated by the blue dot in the West.
  2. Interchange station is indicated by the blue dot in the South-East corner of the map.
  3. There is a large triangular junction connecting the spur to Birmingham Curzon Street to the main North-South route of High Speed Two.

This second map is an enlargement of the South-East corner of the map.

Note.

  1. The road across the bottom of the map is the A45,
  2. The large circular roundabout roughly at the halfway [point is where the M42 crosses the A45 at Junction 6.
  3. The Junction at the Eastern edge of the map is where the A452 crosses the A45.
  4. High Speed Two goes roughly North-South between the M42 and the A452.
  5. When shown in red, High Speed Two is on an embankment.
  6. When shown in yellow, High Speed Two is in a tunnel.
  7. The large blue dot is the position of the Interchange station.
  8. The existing Birmingham International station is on the other side of the M42.
  9. The two stations will be connected by a people mover.

This description of the Interchange station is from this page on the High Speed Two web site.

The Interchange Station itself will be made up of two 415 metre long island platforms, offering 4 platform faces, as well as 2 central high speed through lines for non-stopping services. The station will be linked to the NEC, Birmingham International Station and Birmingham Airport via an automated people mover carrying up to 2,100 passengers per hour in each direction. In addition to the APM, the station will be fully integrated with other local buses, taxis and private vehicle options.

This third map is an enlargement of the triangular junction.

Note.

  1. The M6 going West to Spaghetti Junction, Birmingham and the North.
  2. The M42 and the M6 Toll going North-South.
  3. When shown in red, High Speed Two is on an embankment.
  4. When shown in yellow, High Speed Two is in a tunnel.

The junction seems to have been fitted around the motorways using a series of embankments and tunnels.

This fourth map shows the approach to the City.

Note.

  1. The spur appears to run alongside the elevated section of the M6.
  2. Spaghetti Junction is in the North-West corner of the map.
  3. The Western junction of the triangular junction is at the Eastern edge of the map.
  4. When shown in brown, High Speed Two is on the surface.
  5. When shown in black, High Speed Two is in a cutting.
  6. Or are black and brown, the other way round, as I can’t find the legend for the map.

The spur seems to have been neatly fitted in alongside the M6.

This fifth map shows the route as it terminates in Birmingham Curzon Street station.

Note.

  1. The A38 (M) that connects the City Centre to Spaghetti Junction at the top of the map.
  2. High Speed Two appears to approach the City Centre on a viaduct. But then trains between London and Birmingham New Street and Birmingham Moor Street  stations, do the same.
  3. The three stations are within a reasonable walking distance and there will also be a tram connection.
  4. The journey time between Birmingham Curzon Street and Interchange stations is planned to be nine minutes.

This page on the High Speed Two web site, gives more details on Birmingham Curzon Street station.

June 22, 2020 - Posted by | Transport | , ,

3 Comments »

  1. Curzon Street station adjoins the main line in to New Street station so why no interchange platforms on that or connections between the two?In the HS2 service plans there are trains starting from Curzon Street going north which could surely link up with cross country trains?

    Comment by Hugh Steavenson | June 23, 2020 | Reply

    • There’ll be a tram or a four hundred metre walk.

      Comment by AnonW | June 23, 2020 | Reply

    • yeah, I agree with you Hugh. Seems like a missed opportunity to me. If there were a link and Bromsgrove-Westerleigh (and line into Temple Meads) were electrified, you could run classic-compatible trains from Cardiff and Bristol to Leeds and beyond, replacing the current CrossCountry service.

      One thing that’s planned in the Midlands Rail Hub is an expansion of Moor St, with services from E Midlands and SW of Birmingham arriving via the Bordesley chords, and terminating there. There’s an artist’s impression of the shared station square on p19 of https://www.midlandsconnect.uk/media/1571/midlands-rail-hub-summary-report-final-june-2019.pdf and https://hs2inbirmingham.commonplace.is/schemes/proposals/curzon-street-station/details mentions this too.

      That whole area is very uninviting at the moment, so it shouldn’t be hard to make this much more attractive.

      Comment by Peter Robins | June 27, 2020 | Reply


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