The Anonymous Widower

A Big Advantage Of Only Ten Platforms For High Speed Two At Euston Station

Many of us have been involved in the start-up and handover of a new project, even it is just buying a new house to live in from a builder.

All projects have one thing in common. Something will go wrong, even if it is just the lock on the toilet door.

Harold Macmillan expressed it memorably as “Events, Dear Boy! Events!”

This article on Ian Visits is entitled Call For A Rethink Of HS2’s Euston Station Plans.

These two paragraphs describe the current plan for Euston station.

The current plans for the HS2 station at Euston will see it delivered in two phases, with six platforms opened first to carry HS2 trains on the first stage of the railway up to the West Midlands. The second phase of the Euston station would open later, with an additional 5 platforms to manage demand when HS2 is extended to Crewe, Manchester and Leeds.

Phase one was scheduled for completion in 2026, and phase two in 2033.

This paragraph describes the latest idea from the Department for Transport.

However, the Oakervee review from last year called for a redesign of the station scaling back the station and increasing the amount of oversite development to fund it. Earlier this year it was revealed that the Department for Transport has instructed HS2 to refine the development to build it in one phase, but with just 10 platforms instead of 11 platforms.

There are now two camps arguing as to whether the station should be built with ten or eleven platforms.

The eleven platform station project will involve.

  • Two-phase construction
  • Five platforms by 2026
  • Eleven platforms by 2033

On the other hand, the ten platform station project will involve.

  • Single-phase construction
  • Ten platforms on opening.
  • More oversite development.

Note

  1. There will be eleven trains per hour (tph) in Phase 1 of High Speed Two from London Euston.
  2. , Trains will serve Birmingham, Carlisle, Lancaster, Liverpool, Macclesfield, Manchester. Preston, Stafford, Stoke-on-Trent and Scotland.
  3. Full-size trains will be able to run to Birmingham Curzon Street and Crewe, but not to the two Manchester stations, as the trains don’t fit the infrastructure.

I suspect that Speed Two Classic-Compatible Trains will be running to Manchester.

The Big Advantage Of Ten Platforms

In the two-phase project with eleven platforms to rebuild Euston station, there will be five platforms, when the station opens, but in the single-phase project with ten platforms, there will be ten platforms.

If there are ten platforms, the station must be easier to operate, especially during the tricky phase of opening the new station.

With ten platforms, there will be more space to sort out those unexpected events!

August 22, 2021 - Posted by | Transport | , , ,

7 Comments »

  1. Interesting, if they are opening at the end of 2026 what rolling stock are they going to buy in the intervening period. If they plan to run existing Classic Compatible Trains then they either won’t be able to fully exploit the maximum speed of the Full Size Trains or optimise the capacity of the line.

    Comment by fammorris | August 22, 2021 | Reply

  2. I suspect that 2026 date was old data from the IanVisits site. HS2 are saying that opening will be between 2029 and 2033 for Phase 1 and Phase 2a.

    Comment by AnonW | August 22, 2021 | Reply

  3. For the sake of loosing just one platform building Euston Station in a single stage could provide many benefits especially on cost grounds and ability to merge everything together. The two stage option always has the dangers of the second stage being cut back with fewer than 10 platforms being delivered on final scheme !

    Anyway if Old Oak Common has been designed as throughly as Birmingham International item description of that station then the option of building tunnels that run west to east just north of Euston Station with a link to HS1 beneath Highbury Fields could provide the HS2 to HS1 link that would be far better than the original single track link using the north London line which was originally planned but cancelled given its cost grounds .

    Whether through tracks would have a Station serving Euston St Pancras and Kings Cross will depend on cost and ability to build in a crowded area .

    Comment by Melvyn | August 22, 2021 | Reply

    • Are we losing sight of some of the facts about Classic Compatible trains? It is likely, they will be similar in height and width to modern UK trains like Aventra, Electrostars and the products of CAF, Hitachi, Siemens and Stadler! If they weren’t they wouldn’t be Classic Compatible and wouldn’t be able to share tracks. At 200 metres they wouldn’t be longest trains on the network either.

      Midlands Engine are proposing to run a High Speed Two Classic Compatible train between Leeds and Bedford. If it was truly Classic Compatible, why not extend it through Thameslink to Gatwick Airport and Brighton.

      It would need a third-rail capability, but plenty of engineers can fit that fairly quickly.

      Comment by AnonW | August 22, 2021 | Reply

  4. I am of the view that HS2 should not come to Euston at all, instead starting at Old Oak Common. Shuttle Service to Euston, crossrail, and maybe some other connecting trains from other North London terminal stations.

    Comment by MilesT | August 29, 2021 | Reply

    • In practice it may turn out that way since the station will link Elizabeth line (Crossrail), HS2, Heathrow Express and GWR services to the West, and I assume Paddington, as well as the Midlands. It’s a pity that better interchange facilities aren’t being provided for the North and West London Lines, if they did that would truly make Old Oak Common the de facto terminus
      Shame there’s no easy connection to St. Pancras with its HS1, King’s Cross and Liverpool Street, that would be the icing on the cake.

      Comment by fammorris | August 29, 2021 | Reply

      • I agree that the proposed connections to the North and West London Lines are poor.

        The only way to St. Pancras is to take the Dudding Hill Line and turn South at Cricklewood.

        Comment by AnonW | August 29, 2021


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