The Anonymous Widower

Engineers At Network Rail Are Building A Tiny Railway Crossing For Wild Hazel Dormice To Help Protect The Endangered Species From Extinction

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Railway News.

This is the brief introductory paragraph.

This dormouse bridge will be the first of its kind. It will be built in summer 2022 on the Furness line in Lancashire.

Let’s hope after all this care and work, the dormice like it.

December 1, 2021 - Posted by | Transport/Travel, World | , , ,

8 Comments »

  1. Nice thought but no doubt it will be built to the usual NR exacting and over specified standards that will come with a budget of several million pounds.

    Comment by Andrew Bruton | December 2, 2021 | Reply

  2. Did you look at the picture in the linked article?

    Comment by AnonW | December 2, 2021 | Reply

    • Hi. No. The link would not work. I have since seen an article in this week’s Railwsy Herald which put the budget at £40000. Still a significant sum. I’d love to know how that money was apportioned.

      Comment by Andrew Bruton | December 2, 2021 | Reply

  3. The press release didn’t really give much context and reference to cost can misguide but the website of Animexbridge gives a bit more feel.
    https://animexbridge.com
    Nice little video included

    Comment by fammorris | December 2, 2021 | Reply

  4. A tunnel might be better

    Comment by John | December 2, 2021 | Reply

    • It appears that they’ve spent £40,000 on the project, so let’s hope they got it right.

      Comment by AnonW | December 2, 2021 | Reply

  5. Tunnels would be OK were it not for the fact that Dormice are essentially arboreal and except for the odd under cover forage don’t like being on open ground

    Comment by fammorris | December 2, 2021 | Reply

    • In the past, I’ve used owls and other birds of prey as environmentally-friendly pest control on a farm.

      You identify a nice oak or similar tree, where they might like to sit and spread food or perhaps floor sweepings from stables under the tree.

      Rats and other rodents are attracted to the food, only to be picked off by the airborne sentries. I found the idea in a Hawk Trust booklet and it works.

      It does look like the bridges offer protection from hungry birds of prey too!

      Comment by AnonW | December 2, 2021 | Reply


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