The Anonymous Widower

Mathematics Of Energy Storage

I am particularly talking about the sort of energy storage that is attracting the attention of Energy Storage Funds, that I wrote about in Batteries On The Boil As Fund Attracts Investors.

The Times article of the same name has this paragraph.

A typical 50-megawatt energy storage site of the kind the company intends to acquire hosts 19 containers each housing thousands of lithium-ion cells. A fully-charged container has the energy to boil 32,000 kettles.

This page on ConfusedEnergy.co.uk, says this.

We are often told to only use as much water as we need in a kettle and not to fill it to the top, but what are the potential annual saving in doing this. Well it takes roughly 4.5 minutes to boil a full (2 litre) kettle with a power rating of 3kW (kilowatts).

This means that to boil a kettle needs 0.225 kWh.

  • Boiling 32,000 kettles needs 7200 kWh or 7.2 MWh
  • Which means that the total capacity of the nineteen container energy storage facility is 136.8 MWh.

So the energy storage could provide the rated 50 MW for nearly three hours.

Lithium-Ion Batteries, Supercapacitors Or Both?

The article in The Times doesn’t mention supercapacitors.

If you watch the video in A Must-Watch Video About Skeleton Technologies And Ultracapacitors, Skeleton Technologies state the following about their ultracapacitors.

  • They are more affordable.
  • They generate less heat.
  • They have a higher energy density.
  • They can handle more charge/discharge cycles.
  • They have a faster response time, so would respond better to sudden demands.

I suspect there may be several operational and financial advantages, in replacing some of the lithium-ion batteries with supercapacitors.

 

 

November 10, 2018 Posted by | World | , | Leave a comment

Batteries On The Boil As Fund Attracts Investors

The title of this post is the same as that of an article in the Business section of today’s Times.

This is the first two paragraph.

Investors have sunk £100million into a new listed company that aims to use shipping containers packed with lithium-ion batteries to buy, store and sell electricity.

Gresham House Energy Storage Fund claims that it will make a return of 15 per ceent a year by providing electricity when surges in demand coincide with periods when the wind is not blowing  or the sun is not shining.

Gresham House Energy Storage Fund is the second listed energy storage fund in London, after Gore Street Energy Storage Fund , launched in May.

I think we’ll see more of these funds and use of the technology.

Suppose you were a farmer with a windy hill top farm, that had a heavy electricity bill.

Realistically, sized, priced and financed a  wind-turbine and a container full of batteries, might be just what your finances wanted.

All you’d need now would be an electric Range-Rover and a fleet of electric tractors!

November 10, 2018 Posted by | World | , , , , | 1 Comment

Google Grabs The Best Site In London For Its Massive Groundscraper

This Google Map the site where the massive groundscraper is being built.

Note.

  1. Kings Cross station, which is on the right of the map, has extensive connections to the North-East of England and Scotland.
  2. St. Pancras station, which is on the left of the map, has extensive connections to the Midlands and Belgium, France and the Netherlands, with more services to come including Germany, Switzerland and Western France.
  3. Thameslink runs North-South beneath St. Pancras station, has extensive connections to Bedfordshire, Herfordshire, Kent, Surrey and Sussex.
  4. There are also six Underground Lines.
  5. Gatwick and Luton Airports have direct connections and City, Heathrow and Southend Airports  only need a step-free change.
  6. Improvements in the next few years could mean that HS2 and all of London’s five airports will have a fast direct connection to the area.

In the middle of all these railway lines, sits Google’s groundscraper, which shows as a white structure towards the top of the map.

These pictures show the area between the two stations, the under-construction groundscraper and the new blocks.

And these pictures show the progress on the site.

There is not much that is visible yet!

More Pictures!

But the building will be more visible soon! For those who can’t wait, this article from the Daily Mail has a lot of visualisations.

 

November 8, 2018 Posted by | Computing, World | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

You Are A Rude Terrible President!

Yesterday, Trump showed his bullying side as he dealt with a CNN reporter.

This report on CNN gives their side of the story.

I always remember at a meeting in Cambridge with John Major, where he dealt with press criticism in a polished, barbed and very funny way, such that everybody laughed.

But then Trump is the sort of person, who ignores the general courtesies of life, the freedom of the press and scientific correctness!

But then there are too many Trumps in this world!

November 8, 2018 Posted by | World | , , , , | 2 Comments

Putin’s Only Aircraft Carrier Out Of Action

The title of this post is the same as that of an article in today’s copy of The Times.

This is the first two paragraphs.

Russia could lose its only aircraft carrier after an accident left a five-metre hole in the flight deck.

Admiral Kuznetsov was in the Arctic for repairs when the floating dock underneath it sank, causing a 70-tonne crane to crash on to the carrier killing one person and injuring two.

Enough said!

November 7, 2018 Posted by | World | , , , | 2 Comments

Is Philip Green Going To Suffer The Same Fate As Gerald Ratner?

Gerald Ratner‘s misdemeanour was that he described some of his company’s product as crap, in a rather elaborate way, in a speech to the Institute of Directors.

The company’s share value dropped and he eventually left the company.

But he obviously has a lot of good qualities as he has been successful since.

Philip Green on the other hand, hasn’t had the best of publicity in recent years and especially in the last few months.

How long will it be before he suffers an enforced retirement?

November 6, 2018 Posted by | World | , , | Leave a comment

The City Of London Reaches For The Sky And Keeps More Feet On The Ground

This article on Construction News is entitled City of London To ‘Encourage’ New Skyscrapers.

This is the first two paragraphs.

The City of London Corporation has opened the door to a new wave of towers and an overhaul of one of its main routes as part of draft new local and transport plans.

The local authority wants to encourage the development of new towers able to provide an “iconic image of the City” that will enhance its global standing in the finance, professional services and commerce sectors.

The main route to be upgraded will be Bishopsgate between Liverpool Street station and London Bridge.

  • Pedestrians will have more priority.
  • Cycling and walking will be improved.
  • The public realm will be upgraded.

It the Peak hours, it could become one the busiest walking and cycling routes in the world.

  • At the Northern End, there is Liverpool Street station and Crossrail.
  • At the Southern End, there is London Bridge, London Bridge station, Southwark Cathedral and the River Thames.
  • Just to the West, is the massive Bank station complex.
  • Just to the East, is the soon-to-be-redeveloped Fenchurch Street station.

In addition, the road is fringed on either side with alleys, side streets and the impressive Leadenhall Market, many of which are full of restaurants, cafes, pubs and retail outlets.

Conclusion

In the article, Brexit wasn’t mentioned once, but a large increase in employment wasn’t.

Has the City of London, just put several handfuls of fingers up to the selfish plans of others?

 

 

November 6, 2018 Posted by | Business, Finance, World | , , | Leave a comment

Drilling Starts For ‘Hot Rocks’ Power In Cornwall

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

For as long as I can remember, there have been plans to tap the ‘hot rocks’ under Cornwall for heat and convert it into electricity.

Geothermal power is used in many places around the world.

The Wikipedia entry is worth a read and the Utility-Grade Stations section has this paragraph.

The largest group of geothermal power plants in the world is located at The Geysers, a geothermal field in California, United States. As of 2004, five countries (El Salvador, Kenya, the Philippines, Iceland, and Costa Rica) generate more than 15% of their electricity from geothermal sources.

This is also said.

Enhanced geothermal systems that are several kilometres in depth are operational in France and Germany and are being developed or evaluated in at least four other countries.

As the Cornish project appears to have a degree of EU funding, it looks like Cornwall is one of the four other countries.

The BBC also had a report on the Cornish drilling this morning. They made a point to say that this project has nothing to do with fracking.

Fracking is an emotive project, but we seem to forget that a lot of the engineering and drilling techniques used in the process are also used in other applications, like obtaining fresh water and drilling very deep holes, as is proposed in Cornwall.

It is also enlightening to look at this Wikipedia entry, which describes geothermal power in Germany.

This is said about the sustainability of the power source in Germany.

n the same year (2003) the TAB (bureau for technological impact assessment of the German Bundestag) concluded that Germany’s geothermal resources could be used to supply the entire base load of the country. This conclusion has regard to the fact that geothermal sources have to be developed sustainably because they can cool out if overused.

Based on this, I can understand the enthusiasm for using the technique in Cornwall.

On the BBC this morning, it was said that the Cornish borehole could produce enough electricity for 3,000 homes.

A page on the OVO Energy website, says this.

Household electricity use in the UK dropped under 4,000kWh for the first time in decades in 2014. At an average of 3,940kWh per home, this was about 20% higher than the global average for electrified homes of 3,370kWh.

At 4,000 kWh a year, a home would use an average of 0.46 kW per hour.

This means that to run 3,000 houses needs 1.4 MW per hour.

A typical price of a kWh of electricity is thirteen pence excluding VAT, which means that this plant could earn around £178 per hour or £1.6million a year.

A Project Video

Access the project video here.

Conclusion

I feel that geothermal power could have a promising future in Cornwall.

 

 

 

 

 

November 6, 2018 Posted by | World | , , | 2 Comments

Large Hydropower Dams ‘Not Sustainable’ In The Developing World

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the first four paragraphs.

A new study says that many large scale hydropower projects in Europe and the US have been disastrous for the environment.

Dozens of these dams are being removed every year, with many considered dangerous and uneconomic.

But the authors fear that the unsustainable nature of these projects has not been recognised in the developing world.

Thousands of new dams are now being planned for rivers in Africa and Asia.

I think the report has a sound basis and we should think much deeper before we build a large dam.

Storing energy and preventing of floods are probably good reasons, whereas others are not, considering, that solar and wind power are becoming more affordable.

November 6, 2018 Posted by | World | , , , , | Leave a comment

Tomorrow’s World To Return For One-Off Show

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the first paragraph.

Science and technology show Tomorrow’s World is set to return for the first time in 15 years.

The edition will be shown on BBC4 on November 22nd.

I shall be watching, just as I often did in the 1960s

November 3, 2018 Posted by | World | , | Leave a comment