The Anonymous Widower

Three Steps To Unlocking The Potential Of High-Power Wind Turbines

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on offshireWIND.biz.

This is the first paragraph.

The critical role of wind in the world’s future energy needs is clear: the Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition states that 1,400 gigawatt (GW) of offshore wind power will sustain one tenth of global electricity demand by 2050. Key to achieving this is the upward power rating of wind turbines, which we anticipate will reach an individual turbine capacity of 20 GW within the next five years.

The article is a must-read.

After reading the article, I am convinced that there will be 20 MW turbines in five years.

When turbines of this size are readily available, it is likely that the rate of installation of wind turbines will increase.

December 7, 2022 - Posted by | Energy | , ,

2 Comments »

  1. The way they’ve scaled up the size of units since the first commercial windfarm in UK waters at 2MW to 13MW units is pretty remarkable so i agree 20MW is within reach but i believe one of the biggest constraints now is cranage to get the nacelles so high up. Given we have many farms with low power units I wonder when they will get around to retrofitting the early farms to increase power density.

    Comment by Nicholas Lewis | December 7, 2022 | Reply

    • With floating wind farms the lifting is generally done by a crane on the dockside in a port. This probably ups the size.

      So we may see more floating wind farms.

      I remember in the days of North Sea oil and gas, that the availability of larger cranes made assembly of rigs and platforms easier.

      Comment by AnonW | December 7, 2022 | Reply


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