The Anonymous Widower

China To The UK By Freight Train

This article in the Railway Gazette is entitled First China to UK rail freight service arrives in London.

The article describes in detail how 34 containers came all the way to Barking by train.

It is very much a route-proving exercise at the moment and the UK shipment was effectively part of a larger shipment that was split at Duisburg

in Germany.

The trip can be summarised as follows.

  • The trip took seventeen days, which was faster than container ship.
  • The trip is slower, but a lot cheaper than air-freight.
  • The trip is 12,000 kilometres.
  • There were two changes to gauge and transshipment of the containers on the route.

It is intended to run the trains for three or four months to assess demand.

The article finishes like this.

The project supports the Chinese government’s One Belt, One Road trade connectivity initiative to create a modern-day Silk Road. According to DB around 40 000 containers were transported by rail along the routes between China and Europe in 2016, with journey times of between 12 and 16 days. Annual traffic is expected to increase to 100 000 containers by 2020.

If these figures are achieved, it certainly looks like the route could be approaching viability.

In How To Move 100,000 Containers A Year Between Germany And China, I wrote about German plans to create a standard gauge railway from Germany to China via Georgia, that would avoid Russia and all the gauge-changing.

Without the gauge-change, this would surely be a faster route, thus increasingly viability.

There’s going to be an interestimg commercial battle in the next bfew years between the various metods of getting freight between Europe and China.

 

January 18, 2017 - Posted by | Travel | ,

2 Comments »

  1. I heard about this on the radio earlier today – certainly very interesting.

    Comment by Little Miss Traveller | January 18, 2017 | Reply

    • It must give a lot more flexibility if say you’re building cars and you need as constant supply of Chinese-made components.

      Comment by AnonW | January 18, 2017 | Reply


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