The Anonymous Widower

Hydroflex Takes To The Main Line

The title of this post is the same as that of an article in the November 2020 Edition of Modern Railways.

This is the opening paragraph.

Hydroflex, the UK;s first full-size hydrogen train, made its debut on the main line on 21 September, travelling from Long Marston to Evesham and back.

This looks like a good start.

I am not surprised that the conversion was designed and built by Birmingham University.

Look at this picture of myself in front of a detector in the Large Haldron Collidor at CERN in Geneva.

Much of the detector was built in the workshops at Liverpool University.

The quality of engineering in most universities is very high, which is surely a good omen for the future.

Work in Birmingham on Hydroflex seems to be proceeding apace, with the following objectives.

  • More automation.
  • Moving the hydrogen drive train components to rafts under the driving cars.
  • Improving operating speed from the current 50 mph.

There is also this significant paragraph that quotes Helen Simpson of Porterbrook.

‘At Porterbrook we want to present a fleet of hydrogen trains as a commercial offering to operators’ Ms. Simpson adds, noting that moving equipment out of passenger saloons is an important element of this. Porterbrook will apply learning from its Class 769 electric/diesel bi-mode units, which have placed diesel engines beneath the driving vehicles. Ms. Simpson does not rule out retro-fitment on other classes of train, but notes a lot of work has been undertaken on converting 319s’.

The big difference between the Hydroflex and the Alstom Coradia iLint, is that the Hydroflex retains the capability to use overhead electrification, so the hydrogen power can be used as a range extender.

 

 

November 10, 2020 - Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport | , ,

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