The Anonymous Widower

Stalybridge Station – 16th December 2021

In my meandering along the TransPennine Route brought me to Stalybridge station.

This Google Map shows the station.

As the pictures and the maps show, there is space at Stalybridge station.

Timings Between Manchester Victoria And Huddersfield

There are these trains between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield.

  • Liverpool Lime Street and Scarborough – stops at Stalybridge
  • Manchester Airport and Redcar Central
  • Liverpool Lime Street and Edinburgh
  • Manchester Airport and Newcastle.

That is four trains per hour (tph) between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield.

  • They take around 9-14 minutes between Manchester Victoria and Stalybridge.
  • They take around 31-32 minutes between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield.
  • As Manchester Victoria and Stalybridge is 7.7 miles, the average speed on this section is 33-51 mph
  • As Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield is 25.7 miles, the average speed on this section is 48-50 mph

In this Transport for the North report , which is entitled At A Glance – Northern Powerhouse Rail, an objective of twenty-five minutes is given for Manchester and Leeds.

One possible way to achieve this time stated in the report is stated as.

Diggle upgrades akin to a new line.

Diggle is between Greenfield station and the Standedge tunnels.

Assuming a constant average speed between Manchester Victoria and Leeds, the twenty-minutes objective for this route means a timing of fifteen minutes between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield.

I estimate that this would need an average speed of well over 100 mph to get anywhere near the required fifteen minutes.

But by rebuilding the line between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield to High Speed Two construction standards, it appears to be possible.

Timings Between Manchester Piccadilly And Huddersfield

There are these trains between Manchester Piccadilly and Huddersfield.

  • Manchester Piccadilly and Huddersfield – stops at Stalybridge, Mossley, Greenfield, Marsden and Slaithwaite.
  • Manchester Piccadilly and Hull – stops at Stalybridge

That is two tph between Manchester Piccadilly and Huddersfield.

The direct train is a few minutes slower, but the stopping train is nearly ten minutes slower.

I feel some time improvements will be possible, but the Manchester Victoria services will probably be faster.

Conclusion

It is possible, there could be a unique high speed line between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield through the Victorian tunnels at Standedge.

  • One possibility, I can see is to have two fast tracks for the main TransPennine expresses and a third bi-directional third-track to accommodate the stopping services.
  • The double track express route could probably handle six tph, as the only stops between Manchester Victoria and Huddersfield is two tph that stop at Stalybridge.
  • Operating speeds on the fast tracks could be up to perhaps 160 mph on slab track.
  • All trains stop at Huddersfield.
  • A single bi-directional track between Stalybridge and Huddersfield could easily handle two tph.

There would be engineering challenges, but I feel it would be possible.

December 18, 2021 - Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , ,

9 Comments »

  1. No sign of any OLE work yet by the looks of it?

    Comment by Nicholas Lewis | December 19, 2021 | Reply

    • There was none and the Southport service was a 150!

      Comment by AnonW | December 19, 2021 | Reply

    • I was on the Vic-Staly line recently, and couldn’t see any piling work had been done – though https://manchestertostalybridge.co.uk/ claims there’s been some work round Ashton. There has though been a lot of bridge replacement and other preparatory work (which I can imagine might well cost more than actual electrification). They’ve also been moving the signalling to the new control centre over the Jubilee w/e.

      Comment by Peter Robins | June 6, 2022 | Reply

  2. I am very much in favour of using battery-electric trains to avoid excessive disruption and costs.

    Comment by AnonW | June 6, 2022 | Reply

    • As am I but govt seems hooked on hydrogen

      Comment by Nicholas Lewis | June 6, 2022 | Reply

  3. I’ve ridden in both and there’s nothing wrong for either.

    I think Wrightbus have got the right philosophy for hydrogen and battery. They have double and single decker buses powered by both and they use similar components. Ideal for a mixed fleet.

    But the hydrogen buses have a much longer range than the battery ones.

    Horses for courses!

    I also think, that we may see some unusual hydrogen power plants end up in HGV’s, trains and locomotives.

    Watch Rolls-Royce and Zeroavia.

    Comment by AnonW | June 6, 2022 | Reply

    • > the hydrogen buses have a much longer range than the battery ones

      that may be true atm, but will it still be true in 10 or 20 years time? I doubt it. Batteries have improved hugely over the past 10-20 years, and I see nothing to suggest that process won’t continue. I would liken them to semiconductors. The capability of the average modern semiconductor was unimaginable even 20 years ago, let alone when the things were invented some 75 years ago.

      Comment by Peter Robins | June 6, 2022 | Reply

      • Batteries stalled for a very long period but Lithium gave them a step up but that’s plateauing now. That said Lithium came from decades of research so its always possible that something else will be found

        Comment by Nicholas Lewis | June 6, 2022

      • right on cue, Solid Power are now ready to start up their pilot plant in Colorado, and later in the year supply their partners Ford and BMW with solid-state batteries for testing. https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/06/solid-state-batteries-for-evs-move-a-step-closer-to-production/ If all goes well and the car-makers sign off the design, the first cars fitted with the things should be rolling off production lines in 2024.

        Interestingly, the article says the anodes have a high silicon content, which should lower the price.

        Comment by Peter Robins | June 7, 2022


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: