The Anonymous Widower

A Road Scheme That Appears To Going Nowhere

This article on the BBC is entitled A57 Link Roads Mottram Bypass: Charity Seeks Judicial Review.

This is the sub-heading.

Environmental campaigners are seeking a judicial review of proposals designed to ease road congestion between Manchester and Sheffield.

And these are the first two paragraphs.

Plans for the A57 Link Roads Mottram Bypass scheme were boosted in November when Transport Minister Huw Merriman granted a development consent order.

But countryside charity the CPRE said there was no evidence building a new road “moves away a traffic problem”.

I remember this area well from the 1960s, when I was studying at Liverpool University and my parents lived in Felixstowe.

  • There was no motorway across the Midlands between Coventry and Stafford and the alternative of the A5 was a nose-to-tail crawl.
  • The M62 was still in the design phase.

So I took to using this cross-country route.

  • A45 between Felixstowe and Huntingdon.
  • A1 to Worksop, which was mainly dual-carriageway.
  • A57 to Manchester, through Sheffield and Glossop, which was and still is single-track.
  • A580 to Liverpool.

I think my best time was about five hours in a 1954 Morris Minor.

I feel, I must have gone through Mottram in Longdendale, judging by the map on the BBC article.

It is interesting to read the Wikipedia entry for the Longdendale Bypass, which starts like this.

The Longdendale Bypass (also known as the A57/A628 Mottram-in-Longdendale, Hollingworth & Tintwistle Bypass) is a long-planned road scheme in England by the Highways Agency. The aim is to alleviate traffic congestion on the A57 road/A628 road/A616 road routes that presently pass through the villages. There is both support and opposition for this long-planned scheme which will pass through the valley of Longdendale and part of the Peak District National Park.

The scheme was approved by the Highways Agency in 2014, so politicians have not exactly been quick off the mark.

These are some choice phrases from the Wikipedia entry.

  • It is used by a relatively large number of heavy goods vehicles.
  • Supporters of the scheme say that the A628 is one of the most congested A-road routes in the country.
  • There is no viable alternative to a bypass.
  • A survey in 2010 found that the junction of the A57 and M67 was the most congested in Manchester.

It is a disaster and the intervention by the CPRE will further delay a solution.

Conclusion

It is problems like this, that lead me to one solution.

On the one hand, you improve the railways and on the other you bring in universal road charging.

Hopefully passengers and freight will find a happy equilibrium.

But voters wouldn’t like it and any Government, that brought it in would lose the next election to a yet-to-be-formed Motorists Party.

 

January 13, 2023 - Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. The A628 IS one of the most congested roads in the country. It is also one of the most dangerous, having been nearly killed there myself.
    A Manchester Sheffield motorway was never built, and the 4 track Woodhead rail route was closed around half a century ago. Sadly, its re-opening is not a viable proposition.
    OTOH universal road charging is NOT a solution either, just yet another cost to travel and likely to be exploited by politicians to fund pet schemes (as in London). Some sort of congestion charge based on what I call the “slow taxi meter” method could work. You get charged when driving under 10mph for more than a minute or two and billed when you fill up. No GPS unless caught cheating. Not a very efficient or fair tax however.

    Comment by R. Mark Clayton | January 13, 2023 | Reply

  2. I think we’re agreed that universal road charging will never be a solution.

    But appropriately priced public transport could be part of the solution.

    I suspect though that the real problem is freight, that should be on the M62, which is inadequate.

    My solution would be a development of this post.

    Will HS2 And Northern Powerhouse Rail Go For The Big Bore?

    I would add piggy-back trucks on trains.

    I would use Crossrail technology in the underground stations.

    Would a hundred mph trains be enough?

    I think I’ll rewrite that post.

    Comment by AnonW | January 13, 2023 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: