The Anonymous Widower

Aberdeen Gets A City Deal

Yesterday as reported in this article on the BBC, Aberdeen got a City Deal.

Acording to the BBC, the funding will be used as follows.

  • An initial £200m to improve journey times and increase capacity on key rail links between Aberdeen and the central belt, upgrading the rail line in the Montrose basin
  • £24m for the trunk roads programme to support improvements to the key A90/A937 south junction at Laurencekirk
  • £10m for extension of digital infrastructure in the Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire area above and beyond the commitment through the City Deal
  • £20m in infrastructure funding to unlock housing sites that are of strategic importance to the local authorities as well as five-year certainty on £130m of affordable housing grant.

It all seems good to me, given the problems of the oil industry.

I gained a unique perspective to the North of Scotland, when I travelled from Edinburgh to Inverness, a few years ago. I wrote about the trip in Edinburgh to Invernesss In The Cab Of An HST.

InterCity 125s may be iconic transport, but Scotland’s two Northern cities and the surrounding areas need many more quality services to Edinburgh and Glasgow.

The rail part of the City Deal talks about dualling the railway line from Aberdeen to the South.

I would go further. Consider.

The Aberdeen to Edinburgh Line is a 100 mph railway.

The Aberdeen to Glasgow Line branches off at Dundee and goes to Glasgow via Perth and Stirling.

Important communities are served all along the railways.

Services are every hour, but some are slow, as there are a lot of stops.

In my view Scotland North of the Tay, is ideal IPEMU country. I would run services between Edinburgh and Glasgow and Aberdeen using 125 mph electric trains with an IPEMU capability. These would shorten journey times, not just because of their speed, but because electric trains, stop at stations and then accelerate away in a reduced time.

Obviously, there would need to be some electrification.

  • Across Aberdeen, Aberdeen Crossrail could be built between Dyce and Stonehaven, so that Aberdeen could have an electrified cross-city service.
  • Around Dundee and Perth. This would come with the aspiration of connecting these two cities to the much-delayed Edinburgh to Glasgow electrification with electric trains. These trains could have an IPEMU capability.

It would give the Eastern side of the North of Scotland the railway links it needs.

To provide electric services to Inverness would be trickier, but as support for IPEMUs gets even more innovative, I suspect that Perth and Aberdeen to Inverness could be bridged.

I think IPEMUs are one area, where engineers will be able to marry all sorts of disparate technology together to give improvements, others would think impossible or even downright silly.

The main northern routes and their approximate distances are.

  • Dundee to Aberdeen – 70 miles
  • Aberdeen to Inverness – 100 miles
  • Perth to Inverness – 110 miles

The only route that could be served by an IPEMU at the present time is Dundee to Aberdeen. But this would mean that creating an electric service from Glasgow and Edinburgh to Aberdeen is not the major engineering project that many believe it to be.

It would need.

  • Creation of an electrified Aberdeen Crossrail from Dyce to Inverurie.
  • Electrification from Stirling to Dundee via Perth.
  • The purchase of some suitable trains with an IPEMU capability.

Get the railways to the North of Perth and Dundee right and the benefits to the North of Scotland could be immense.

  • An improved rail service would increase tourism, with all the benefits that brings.
  • Aberdeen Airport would get a proper rail service.
  • Edinburgh to Aberdeen by train is now well over two hours. Steam trains in the 1895 Race To The North did it in only an hour longer.
  • 125 mph trains with an IPEMU capability could break the two-hour barrier.
  • Ferries for the Orkneys and Shetlands leave from a port near to Aberdeen station. so those islands could benefit.

I also believe that if the lines are improved in the North, then connectivity in the South of Scotland should also be improved.

Scotland needs to get its railway improvement plans into shape.

January 29, 2016 - Posted by | Transport | , , ,

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