The Anonymous Widower

Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Highspeed Routes

The Kent On The Cusp Of Change article in the July 2017 Edition of Modern Railways talks about the Southeastern Highspeed routes through Kent.

Some principles are laid down.

The article gives an estimate that at least another twenty Class 395 trains are needed of which perhaps three would have batteries for operation along the Marshlink Line between Ashford International and Ore stations.

The new timetable proposed in the article is similar to that now, with the following changes in each hour.

  • All Day – A St. Pancras – Ashford – Dover Priory service runs once per hour and splits at Ashford with one six-car train going to and from Hastings and the other six-car train going to and from Dover Priory.
  • Off Peak – A new St. Pancras – Ashford – Canterbury West service runs once per hour.
  • All Day –  A new St. Pancras – Ebbsfleet service runs twice per hour.
  • Off Peak – A new St. Pancras – Gravesend – Strood – Maidstone West service runs once per hour.

In addition all trains passing Thanet Parkway station will stop after it opens.

The Fawkham Junction Link

The article talks about reinstating this link , which connects the Chatham Main Line to Ebbsfleet International station and High Speed One.

I wrote about this link in a related post called Fawkham Junction Link, which shows how it can be used to create additional Highspeed services between London and Thanet.

  • Victoria becomes a second terminal for Highspeed services.
  • Victoria gets a Highspeed connection to Ebbsfleet International and Ashford International stations for Eurostar.
  • Most if not all of the Thanet services become Highspeed services.
  • Thanet services are faster with more capacity.

Obviously, Network Rail and the TOCs (train operating companies) have some cunning plan to use the Fawkham Junction Link.

Should All Victoria To Thanet Services Be Run By Highspeed Trains?

In my trip to Longfield Station, I came back iat a leisurely pace in a Class 465 train, that had started at Dover or Ramsgate.

As the routes to Thanet from Victoria can all be run by twelve-car trains and the platforms in East Kent are accessible to twelve-car Class 377, Class 395 and Class 465 trains, I wonder if Class 395 trains or a train with a similar performance, should run all these routes in an identical manner to the slower trains.

Consider.

  • Calls at many stations would only be made by twelve-car Highspeed trains, which must make station design simpler and station stops easier and faster.
  • Highspeed trains would be able to take advantage of any line speed improvements on the route.
  • Highspeed trains are fitted with modern signalling systems including ERTMS, which would allow more capacity on busy sections of the routes. Between Victoria and Swanley could benefit.
  • Crossrail and Thameslink trains already have ERTMS, so this must give advantages, on shared routes.
  • A single unified fleet to Thanet must ease servicing and maintenance, which is done currently at Ashford and Ramsgate.
  • High Speed One could be used as a diversion route if required.
  • Victoria could be used as a diversion for Highspeed services, if there were problems on High Speed One to the West of Ebbsfleet station.

The outcome would surely be that even the Victoria to Thanet stoppers would be several minutes faster.

What would faster services be worth to the new train operating company?

Conclusion

Highspeed services could be increased in frequency and developed to a second terminal at Voctoria.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see all services to Thanet run by a single uinified fleet of Highspeed trains.

See Also

These are related posts.

To know more read Kent On The Cusp Of Change in the July 2017 Edition of Modern Railways.

 

 

June 29, 2017 - Posted by | Travel | , , ,

18 Comments »

  1. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Elimination Of Slow Trains « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  2. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Ashford Spurs « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  3. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  4. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Fawkham Junction Link « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  5. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Crossrail « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  6. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Highspeed To Hastings « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

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  8. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Thameslink « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  9. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Thanet Parkway Station « The Anonymous Widower | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  10. So selfishly I want to see a viable daily commute from my home station of St Leonards (not Hastings). So which of the four bidders should I be cheering for?

    If the winning group bought three 25KAC / Deisel hybrid trains, would one of them simply be sitting around spare, unable, due its wierdness to be used elswhere?

    If they went for the dividing plan at Ashford, how much extra time would this add? Whenever I experience these activities there always seem to be a confusion of doors opening and closing, announcements, and general clanging about. Still miles better than getting another train though..

    Comment by matbest | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  11. I think that the one who wins the bid will have a very good proposal for Hastings and St. Leonards.

    Everybody talks of turning the trains at Hastings, but I think that those clever engineers from Hitachi will come up with something special, that will enable the trains to cross the Ashford-Ore gap on battery power and then use third-rail to a suitable terminal. My money would be on Eastbourne, as the layout at that station would give good interface to trains to and from the west.

    They could expect passengers to change at Hastings, but I think they’d get Amber Rudd objecting.

    I’m pretty sure the trains won’t be diesel hybrids as hauling diesel through the London tunnels is probably not allowed.

    I wouldn’t be surprised to see an interim solution, where there is a change at Hastings, as to go to Eastbourne efficiently probably needs some work on the level crossing just outside the town.

    As to dividing at Ashford, these trains do it with all the panache of a couple of ballroom dancers. It’s a completely automatic process and you can find videos on Youtube. It’ll be just a couple of minutes.

    Comment by AnonW | June 30, 2017 | Reply

  12. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Historic Routes « The Anonymous Widower | July 1, 2017 | Reply

  13. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change n- Ultimate Class 395 Train « The Anonymous Widower | July 1, 2017 | Reply

  14. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Track Improvements « The Anonymous Widower | July 2, 2017 | Reply

  15. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Longfield Station « The Anonymous Widower | July 4, 2017 | Reply

  16. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Maidstone « The Anonymous Widower | July 7, 2017 | Reply

  17. […] Highspeed Routes […]

    Pingback by Kent On The Cusp Of Change – Abbey Wood Station « The Anonymous Widower | July 14, 2017 | Reply


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