The Anonymous Widower

Boeing Suffers New 737 Max Issue That Could Delay Return

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is the first paragraph.

US regulators have uncovered a possible new flaw in Boeing’s troubled 737 Max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights.

The FAA have released this statement.

The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) is following a thorough process, not a prescribed timeline, for returning the Boeing 737 Max to passenger service. The FAA will lift the prohibition order when we deem it is safe to do so. We continue to evaluate Boeing’s software modification to the MCAS and we are still developing necessary training requirements. We are also responding to recommendations received from the Technical Advisory Board. The TAB is an independent review panel we have asked to review our work regarding 737 Max return to service. On the most recent issue, the FAA’s process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks. The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing must investigate.

Bodies like the FAA don’t take chances.

The BBC article also says this.

Other sources said the problem was linked to the aircraft’s computing power and whether the processor possessed enough capacity to keep up.

Sorry Boeing! But I’ll never fly in a 737 Max!

 

June 27, 2019 - Posted by | Computing, Transport | ,

3 Comments »

  1. It has a Zylog ZX81 processor what more do you want?

    Tim

    Comment by Tim Regester | June 27, 2019 | Reply

    • Remember that Apollo 11’s computer overloaded on landing on the moon. Armstrong awitched it out and landed manually!

      Comment by AnonW | June 27, 2019 | Reply

  2. Probably an 8086 processor!

    Comment by mauricegreed | June 28, 2019 | Reply


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