The Anonymous Widower

Does London Need High Capacity Bus Routes To Extend Crossrail?

If Crossrail has a major problem, it is that some areas of the capital will find it difficult to access the new line.

Up to the age of sixteen, I used to live half-way between Oakwood and Cockfosters stations on the Piccadilly Line.

There are a large number of people who live along the Northern reaches of the Piccadilly Line, who might want to use Crossrail to perhaps go to Heathrow or places in East London.

But the journey will need a double change as there is no interchange between the Piccadilly Line and Crossrail.

I suspect that many will link to Crossrail by taking the Piccadilly Line to Wood Green, Turnpike Lane or Manor House and then get a 141 bus to Moorgate. It is a route, I use if I want to go to Southgate or Cockfosters from my house, which has a 141 stop opposite.

But then as a child to go to Harringay, where my father had an uncle, my mother would use a 641 trolley bus from Wood Green or Turnpike Lane.

Do people follow the public transport habits of their parents?

I know I do!

My father never went on a deep tube. As he several times mentioned the terrible Bank station bombing in the Blitz, which killed 56 people, I always thought that was his problem. But now living as I do along the Northern and Northern City Lines, I suspect it was more to do with air quality, as we were or are both bad breathers.

I suspect that when Crossrail opens, the 141 bus will be heavily used by travellers going between the Northern reaches of the Piccadilly Line and Crossrail at Moorgate.

The 141 bus goes between London Bridge station and Palmers Green and it has a route length of about nine miles.

Currently, buses run every fifteen minutes or so, but I doubt it will be enough in future as Transport for London are rerouting the closely-related 21 bus.

I suspect any route seen as an extension of Crossrail needs to have the following characteristics.

  • High frequency of perhaps a bus every ten minutes.
  • Interior finish on a par with the Class 345 trains.
  • Wi-fi and phone charging.

I would also hope the buses were carbon-free. Given that some of these routes could be quite long, I would suspect hydrogen with its longer range could be better.

Other Routes

According to me, the 141 bus route needs improvement!

But how many other routes could need similar improvement?

February 16, 2022 - Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport/Travel | , , , , , ,

5 Comments »

  1. Crossrail’s deficiency is that it does not serve the Central/Piccadilly line interchange at Holborn though it goes very close to it.I gather that this is among other things for space reasons.However there is a rail link with just one change at Finsbury Park to Moorgate for the combined Liverpool Street/Moorgate interchange.However not ideal as from underground Piccadilly line platforms to mainline platforms.

    Comment by Hugh Steavenson | February 19, 2022 | Reply

  2. Just remembered other links from Piccadilly line to Crossrail with one change and one stop!Kings Cross to Farringdon,Holborn to Tottenham Court Road and Green Park to Bond Street.

    Comment by Hugh Steavenson | February 21, 2022 | Reply

  3. The Victoria line does not have any in station interchange either with Crossrail as this bypasses Oxford Circus though there is an out of station interchange with Bond Street’s eastern exit at Hanover Square a short walk away which also very near Regent Street.

    Comment by Hugh Steavenson | February 25, 2022 | Reply

    • Alternatively, you can walk across to the Northern City Line and change at Moorgate.

      The problem with out-of-station interfaces, as they can be difficult for some passengers.

      Comment by AnonW | February 25, 2022 | Reply

  4. […] talked about this problem before in Does London Need High Capacity Bus Routes To Extend Crossrail?, where I said […]

    Pingback by Elizabeth Line To Open On 24 May 2022 « The Anonymous Widower | May 15, 2022 | Reply


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