The Anonymous Widower

Railway Lines Through East Midlands Hub Station

This Google Map shows the position of High Speed Two‘s East Midland Hub station to the West of Nottingham.

Note.

  1. In the North East Corner of the map, is a label saying Japanese Water Garden. Below that is a blue dot, which marks the Toton Lane tram stop.
  2. Three red arrows relate to Toton Ballast Sidings, Old Toton Sidings (Black Path) and Toton Sidings from North to South.
  3. Running to the West of the arrows is a double-track railway and beyond that are a large number of sidings.

This second Google Map shows some of the sidings.

The double track main line is the Erewash Valley Line.

It is sounds complicated this map from High Speed Two may help.

Note.

  1. High Speed Two is shown in orange, with the blue dot indicating the East Midlands Hub station.
  2. Nottingham station is to the North East.
  3. Attenborough station can be picked out on the line going to Nottingham station.
  4. The water is in the Trent Valley.
  5. Trent Junction is the large triangular junction to the West of High Speed Two.
  6. Two rail lines lead to the West from Trent junction; the northerly one goes to Derby by Long Eaton and the other is a freight line to Castle Donington and East Midlands Gateway.

It is worth looking at how the various passenger services go through the area.

  • CrossCountry – Cardiff and Nottingham goes via Derby, Long Eaton, Attenborough, Beeston and Nottingham
  • CrossCountry – Birmingham and Nottingham goes via Derby, Long Eaton, Attenborough, Beeston and Nottingham
  • East Midlands Railway – Leicester and Lincoln goes via East Midlands Parkway, Attenborough, Beeston and Nottingham
  • East Midlands Railway – Liverpool and Norwich goes via Alfreton, Langley Mill, Ilkeston and Nottingham
  • East Midlands Railway – Matlock and Newark Castle goes via Derby, Long Eaton, Attenborough, Beeston and Nottingham
  • East Midlands Railway – St. Pancras and Sheffield goes via East Midlands Parkway, Long Eaton and Derby
  • East Midlands Railway – St. Pancras and Nottingham goes via East Midlands Parkway, Attenborough, Beeston and Nottingham
  • Northern – Leeds and Nottingham goes via Alfreton, Langley Mill, Ilkeston and Nottingham.

Note.

  1. Not one service goes past the site of the new East Midlands Hub station.
  2. Most services to and from Nottingham seem to use the Attenborough and Beeston route
  3. Services between Derby and Nottingham go via the Long Eaton, Attenborough and Derby route.
  4. Services from the North use the Erewash Valley Line and turn East at Trowell for Nottingham.

It is fairly obvious that there needs to be a sort-out of services to fit in with the location of the new East Midlands Parkway station.

May 31, 2020 - Posted by | Transport | , , , ,

5 Comments »

  1. […] Railway Lines Through East Midlands Hub Station, I detailed where the new East Midlands Hub station is to be built and the rail services in the […]

    Pingback by Access To Toton – Scheme 6 – Trowell Curve « The Anonymous Widower | May 31, 2020 | Reply

  2. The carnage under the famous scapegoat Dr Beeching destroyed all the existing routes in the area that would make HS2 possible for many. You can view the maps on “https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=14&lat=52.89094&lon=-1.24634&layers=10&b=1. The 1961 map is very clear what was there then. The route to Manchester from Trent would be a cheaper option if you can remove the walkers and cyclists over the Peak hills!

    Comment by jagracer | May 31, 2020 | Reply

  3. When you look at some of the lines he recommended for closure, that were obvious to keep and some that he recommended to keep, like the Varsity Line and the Borders Railway, you do wonder whether the Government of the time, had a political agenda and used Beeching to facilitate it. Wasn’t the head of the Transport and General in his Government?

    After all, Harold Wilson is quoted as saying that we won’t need trains, as everybody will have their own cars.

    I can’t complain about Wilson, as his silly idea of a Selective Employment Tax meant I made a lot of money modelling the effects of the tax for a major bank. Two of the guys, I worked with, became very good friends.

    Comment by AnonW | May 31, 2020 | Reply

    • Very much an ill wind blows good somewhere else. I did a quick calculation a few years ago at the tonnage of scrap steel and brass sold to Japan by UK scrap dealers as a result of cutting up steam engines, rolling stock, and thousands of miles of railway lines. It gives the amount that Britain was in debt in 1966, when the country was technically bankrupt. It kept Harold in power a bit longer. The country in 1949 could not afford oil to run Diesel engines then, and all the steam coal was exported to pay for Council Houses. I wonder how much the real cost is to run a 200 mile an hour train from London to Manchester. The LNER, in 1938 made a profit running the Jubilee Expresses from London to Edinburgh.

      Comment by jagracer | June 1, 2020 | Reply

  4. I have seen serious calculations done by someone at the Liverpool University Business School, who said that HS2 will be worth a lot of money to the city.

    Currently, there’s an hourly fast train to the city from London, that takes 2:14. The service is not good enough for a day-trip for business or leisure. The frequency is doubling next year and new faster trains will be on the route in a couple of years.

    That will see a lot more day visitors to Liverpool and will bring serious economic benefit to the city.

    HS2 comes along and then adds two faster trains per hour into the mix, that will take 1:34.

    Liverpool will become a Turn-Up-And-Go destination from London!

    Manchester will get three trains per hour to add to the Pendelinos, that will take 1:07.

    Leeds will get three trains per hour, that will take 1:21.

    Comment by AnonW | June 1, 2020 | Reply


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