The Anonymous Widower

Daimler Unveils Electric Bus With 441 kWh Solid-State Battery Pack

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on electrek.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Daimler has unveiled an electric bus equipped with a solid-state battery pack — probably becoming the first planned production EV with a solid-state battery.

What is meant by solid-state battery, is not stated.

But at 441 kWh it is not a small battery!

This article on the Daimler Global Media Site gives these extra details.

In general, vehicles with solid-state batteries as standard were not expected until the middle of this decade. Mercedes-Benz is faster: the new eCitaro G is the first series production city bus in its category anywhere in the world to be equipped with solid-state batteries. They have a very high energy density which is around 25 percent greater than the coming generation of traditional lithium-ion batteries with liquid electrolyte. The result is an impressive energy content of 441 kWh for the new eCitaro G. This battery technology is also free of the chemical element cobalt and therefore especially environmentally friendly in the manufacture of the components.

The long life of the solid-state batteries is particularly striking. Therefore, when purchasing an eCitaro with solid-state batteries, a basic guarantee for the high-voltage battery for up to 10 years or up to 280 MWh energy throughput per battery pack is standard.

They sound impressive.

October 2, 2020 - Posted by | Energy Storage, Transport | , , ,

5 Comments »

  1. When you read the Daimler webpage you linked to it also refers to NMC batteries as an alternative if you want fast charging so that implies solid state take longer to charge? Maybe that wont be an issue for public transport operators who have overnight to get them recharged

    Comment by Nicholas Lewis | October 3, 2020 | Reply

  2. Did you read the post, I did later about Jo Bamford and his plans? He had some unpleasant truths for battery buses.

    Comment by AnonW | October 4, 2020 | Reply

  3. I’ve been trying to find some more info on the solid-state batteries. This seems to be the first result of Daimler’s partnership with Hydro Quebec https://www.daimler.com/innovation/drive-systems/electric/development-partnership-hydro-quebec.html http://news.hydroquebec.com/en/press-releases/1580/hydro-quebec-partners-with-mercedes-benz-on-development-of-solid-state-battery-technologies/ It seems there’s only limited production capacity at present, so it’s more in the way of a pilot project. Still significant though, as solid-state has the potential to dramatically improve battery transport if the challenges of putting into mass production can be resolved.

    Comment by Peter Robins | October 4, 2020 | Reply

  4. I suspect that they could be some form of flow battery. As Daimler are producing their own fuel-cells for the trucks, could it be that they want to have all their own power systems, just like they do with diesel engines.

    If they can get it right and better than their competitors, this could dominate the market. They also have a tie-up with Volvo Trucks on hydrogen.

    Comment by AnonW | October 4, 2020 | Reply

  5. Hydro Quebec’s page implies that these are lithium metal. I’m no expert on the science, but this recent paper https://www.pnas.org/content/117/23/12550#sec-7 gives 10x energy density for solid-state Li metal vs Li-ion. Even if production versions can’t match that, solid-state should dramatically increase the range for transport batteries.

    Daimler are also developing a fuel-cell version of the eCitaro https://fuelcellsworks.com/news/mercedes-benz-sweg-launching-ecitaro-bus-with-fuel-cell-technology-in-2022/ They describe this as a ‘range extender’ (they use the same term in German), which I think is correct. A hydrogen bus (or train) is a battery bus with an additional hydrogen tank to recharge the battery en route, giving a greater range.

    Comment by Peter Robins | October 4, 2020 | Reply


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