The Anonymous Widower

Dutch Province To Introduce Regular Hydrogen Services

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the International Railway Journal.

This is the introductory paragraph.

The regional transport authority in the Dutch province of Groningen has announced plans to introduce hydrogen trains for its regional concession following a successful test earlier this year.

In March 2019, I went to Groningen and explored the railways in the area, where Stadler GTW trains are used for the train services.

These trains are a smaller version of Greater Anglia’s Class 755 trains.

In The Train Station At The Northern End Of The Netherlands, I describe a visit to Eemshaven station to the North of Groningen.

I said this.

At the turnround at Eemshaven with the driver, he indicated that there had been speculation about battery and hydrogen trains in the North of The Netherlands.

It appears the driver was right.

The Bridge Over The Ems

The article also indicates that the bridge over the River Ems, that I wrote about in From Groningen To Leer By Train, could be opening soon.

This video shows what the new bridge will look like.

And this Google Map shows the current state of the bridge.

I’m not sure of the date of the picture, but there still appears a lot of work to do.

 

 

October 2, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Daimler Unveils Electric Bus With 441 kWh Solid-State Battery Pack

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on electrek.

This is the introductory paragraph.

Daimler has unveiled an electric bus equipped with a solid-state battery pack — probably becoming the first planned production EV with a solid-state battery.

What is meant by solid-state battery, is not stated.

But at 441 kWh it is not a small battery!

This article on the Daimler Global Media Site gives these extra details.

In general, vehicles with solid-state batteries as standard were not expected until the middle of this decade. Mercedes-Benz is faster: the new eCitaro G is the first series production city bus in its category anywhere in the world to be equipped with solid-state batteries. They have a very high energy density which is around 25 percent greater than the coming generation of traditional lithium-ion batteries with liquid electrolyte. The result is an impressive energy content of 441 kWh for the new eCitaro G. This battery technology is also free of the chemical element cobalt and therefore especially environmentally friendly in the manufacture of the components.

The long life of the solid-state batteries is particularly striking. Therefore, when purchasing an eCitaro with solid-state batteries, a basic guarantee for the high-voltage battery for up to 10 years or up to 280 MWh energy throughput per battery pack is standard.

They sound impressive.

October 2, 2020 Posted by | Energy Storage, Transport | , , , | 5 Comments

Daimler Trucks Presents Technology Strategy For Electrification – World Premiere Of Mercedes-Benz Fuel-Cell Concept Truck

This title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Daimler Global Media Site.

These are the opening bullet points.

  • Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck, a fuel-cell truck with a range of up to 1,000 kilometers and more for flexible and demanding long-haul transport – customer trials in 2023, start of series production in second half of this decade.
  • Mercedes-Benz eActros LongHaul, a battery-electric truck with a range of about 500 kilometers for energy-efficient transport on plannable long-haul routes – projected to be ready for series production in 2024.
  • Mercedes-Benz eActros, a battery-electric truck with a range of well over 200 kilometers for heavy urban distribution to go into series production in 2021.
  • ePowertrain global platform architecture offers synergies and economies of scale.

Judging by the spelling, this media copy, is from the bad spellers of Trumpland.

It looks to be a case of Daimler have called up the heavy brigade.

The best way to learn more is to search for “Mercedes-Benz GenH2 Truck”

There’s some good YouTube videos.

From this video, I ascertained the following.

  • The truck has a stainless steel tank for liquid hydrogen on either side between the front and rear wheels.
  • There are two 150 kW fuel cells, which appear to be of an inhouse Mercedes design.
  • There is a 70 kWh battery between the two liquid hydrogen tanks low down in the middle of the truck.
  • The battery can supply 400 kW, if needed.

This screen capture shows a cutaway from the video.

I am impressed by the design.

  • Everything is fitted neatly in the small space.
  • The design doesn’t seem to intrude into the load space, so I would assume, it would work with all existing trailers and bodies.
  • The battery position must help stability and driveability.
  • It looks like a design, that would be friendly to cyclists, as the hydrogen tanks act as a round safety barrier.

I shall look at the operation.

Consider.

  • The current Actros trucks have engines with a power of up to 500 HP or 400 kW.
  • The 70 kWh battery can provide 400 kW for about 10 minutes.
  • Regenerative braking to the battery must be possible.
  • There’s probably a well-programmed computer between the driver and the electric transmission.

I wouldn’t be surprised that the truck is more of a battery-hydrogen hybrid, than a pure hydrogen truck.

Suppose, it was hauling a heavy load from Felixstowe to Manchester.

  • Will the truck charge the battery before it leaves Felixstowe? It could use the fuel cells or be plugged in to a high-performance charger. 70 kWh, is not the biggest of batteries compared to say those on a train.
  • Once on the A45 (Sorry! A14), it would accelerate quickly to the cruising speed, probably using mostly battery power.
  • It would then cruise mainly using hydrogen and the fuel cells to the destination. The truck would be optimised for an economic cruise.
  • During any deceleration, regenerative braking to the battery would be used.
  • Battery power might be called upon on any inclines or after a stop.

Intriguingly, a range of 1000 kilometres or 620 miles would allow many out-and-bank journeys in the UK, France, Germany or Italy to be performed without refuelling.

Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester and Newcastle are all under 300 miles from the Suffolk port.

Conclusion

I used to part-own a company, that financed trucks, moving loads into and out of Felixstowe in the 1980s.

From what I learned then of the heavy truck market, hydrogen-powered heavy trucks are going to be a winner, especially, if most journeys are out-and-back from one end.

October 2, 2020 Posted by | Design, Hydrogen | , , , , | 1 Comment

The Small Sign That Means So Much To A Coeliac

I’ve bought Marks & Spencer’s mackerel pate for any years.

It’s the first time, I’ve noticed the packaging has the gluten-free symbol.

More please! My eyesight needs glasses to read the allergies!

October 2, 2020 Posted by | Food | , , | 2 Comments

A Useful Tool

The Times has added a useful tool to its web site, which shows the latest figures for the covids, according to a particular post code. It also shows the rules that apply.

This is the display for Hackney, where I live.

And this is the one for Liverpool, where I go regularly, although, I’ve only been once since March.

I shall use these displays to check before I travel.

Perhaps, The Times or another organ, should do something of a similar ilk for countries and places, we might want to visit.

October 2, 2020 Posted by | Health, Transport | , , , | 3 Comments