The Anonymous Widower

The Secret Of The TwinHub

I was reading about the TwinHub, which is a pair of wind turbines, that are to be mounted on a single float.

There is an explanatory video on the TwinHub home page. Just scroll the page down and you’ll find a full page video, that is rather beautiful and slightly hypnotic.

But note how it stops and starts in the wind and turns itself into a position, so that it is generating the maximum amount of wind.

So how does it do that?

It is not by clever computers and a whole host of actuators, but by good old-fashioned aerodynamics.

Above the video, there is a picture of the sea, with these words underneath.

This demonstration project will be located at the Wave Hub site, and will consist of two floating platforms anchored to the seabed. Each floating platform will host two turbines with inclined towers. The total installed capacity will be between 30 to 40 MW.

Two words are the key to the design – inclined towers.

The wind will apply a force to each turbine and because the towers are inclined, this will apply a force, that will turn the turbines so they are facing the wind. This will maximise the power generated.

The design is elegant, efficient and enchanting.

I can see the TwinHub becoming an unusual tourist attraction in Cornwall.

 

November 30, 2022 - Posted by | Design, Energy | , ,

1 Comment »

  1. Nothing new here – for centuries windmills had tops, or sometimes even the whole mill that could be turned to face the wind. Better ones either had a vane at the back to blow it round or a small rotor or mechanism that would rotate the sals to face the wind.

    Comment by R. Mark Clayton | December 1, 2022 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: