The Anonymous Widower

Anniesland And Glasgow Queen Street Via Maryhill In A Class 230 Train

In Issue 864 of Rail Magazine there is an article about the Class 230 train demonstration in Scotland, that I wrote about in Battery Class 230 Train Demonstration At Bo’ness And Kinneil Railway.

This is the first paragraph.

Vivarail is targeting Scottish routes such as Glasgow Queen Street-Anniesland via Maryhill for its converted London Underground D-Stock, now known as Class 230s.

The Maryhill Line is a short line between Anniesland and Glasgow Queen Street stations.

  • There is a shuttle service of two trains per hour, which appear to take about twenty minutes each way.
  • There are six intermediate stations
  • The line is not electrified and is run by a two-car diesel train.
  • Various works have been performed on the line in recent years to make it more useful and easy to operate.

So why has this short line not been electrified?

On Rail Forums, various reasons are put forward including.

  • The Maryhill Line might not have the traffic for a three-car electric train.
  • It could be a rather tricky electrification.
  • There are also issues with lower-powered diesel trains climbing the incline out of Queen Street station, which seem to make creating a diagram for trains on the Maryhill Line difficult.

I suspect that for air quality reasons, Transport Scotland would like to have less diesel trains in city centres.

So a self-contained independently-powered two-car train, shuttling between Queen Street and Anniesland may be a viable solution?

Would battery-powered Class 230 train be able to work the route?

  • The trains would be the right size.
  • They would be emission-free and quiet.
  • The performance of the Class 230 train is probably enough to work the current service.
  • Third-rail charging would be possible in the bay platform at Anniesland station.
  • If required a charging rail could be added in Queen Street station.
  • The platform at Anniesland station could be long enough to stable two trains overnight.
  • Except for the charging systems, no new infrastructure would be required.

It could turn out to be another quirky, useful and reliable railway to add to the Glasgow Subway.

 

October 25, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 6 Comments