The Anonymous Widower

First D-Train With Transport for Wales In March 2019

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Rail Magazine.

This is the first paragraph.

The first Class 230 D-Train for Transport for Wales should be ready by March 2019, with all five in traffic from May 2019.

There are also other details.

The Train Formation

More details are given about the formation of the Class 230 trains.

  • The trains will be three cars.
  • The driving cars will have batteries.
  • The centre car will have four generators.

When the trains were D78 Stock on the London Underground, they ran as a six-car train formed of two half-trains containing.

  • DM – Driving Motor
  • T – Trailer
  • UNDM – Uncoupling Non-Driving Motor

The two UNDM cars were coupled together, to form the six-car train.

So is the formation of a Class 230 train as follows?

  • DM – Driving Motor with battery
  • T – Trailer with four generators
  • DM – Driving Motor with battery

I would suspect that the DM cars are identical.

Regenerative Braking

The trains will have regenerative braking, where the energy recovered will be stored in the batteries.

In the D78 Stock, the Trailer car wasn’t motored, so unless motors are fitted in this application, the two Driving Motor cars can almost be considered two identical battery locomotives with regenerative braking, that are solely responsible for moving the train.

The Trailer Car With Power

The Trailer Car in the middle of the train contains the four generators.

The Wikipedia entry for the Ford Duratorq engine, has a section for a 3.2 litre diesel engine, where this is said.

The 3.2 is an I5 engine used in the Ford Transit, the Ford Ranger, Ford Everest, Mazda BT-50 and the Vivarail D-Train.

The standard engine has a rating of 200 hp or 150 kW.

The Class 230 train would appear to have an installed power of 600 kW.

Interiors

The article says that everything the passenger will see inside the train is new!

Performance

This is a quote from Tristan Guyard of Transport for Wales.

On the Conwy Valley and Wrexham – Bidston routes, ‘230s’ will be quicker than most other new trains built in the UK at the moment. This is because of the high proportion of motored wheels and the use of batteries to provide additional power. When these trains come into service, we will be able to improve journey times and have a more flexible timetable as soon as 2019.

The Conwy Valley Line seems a stiff route, which might get a better service with a more powerful train.

The Wrexham-Bidston route currently takes 56 minutes to go South and 58 minutes to go North, which probably makes timetabling a half-hourly service a difficult job.

Will the Class 230 trains offer enough extra performance for these services?

Perhaps this is why they have four diesel power packs.

We will find out next year, what is the toughness of these remanufactured London Underground trains!

Thoughts On The Traction System

How Does The Power Compare To Other Trains?

How powerful is the 600 kW in the Class 230 train?

By comparison. a two-car Class 156 train, has 860 kW of diesel power.

On the other hand the three-car Class 230 train has regenerative braking using batteries.

Is The Class 230 Train A Serial Hybrid?

In a serial hybrid vehicle, a power source like a diesel engine charges the battery and the battery drives the vehicle and powers internal systems.

The classic serial hybrid vehicle is a New Routemaster bus, which is powered by a 138 kW diesel engine.

In this bus., the engine starts and stops to keep the energy in the battery within a particular range.

It is a very simple control system and is regularly used in many applications, where water or temperature levels are to be kept within range.

The layout of the Class 230 train with a central power car could easily provide power to the batteries in the two Driving cars.

The train’s control system would switch the engines on and off automatically as required.

If two diesel generators supplied the battery in each Driving Car, the train could even be considered a double serial hybrid.

So this should make the train reliable, as most components of the drive-train are duplicated.

Conclusion

I sometimes feel that the Class 230 train could end up as a heroic design failure.

But then the oldest trains in service on the UK’s rail network are the London Underground 1938 Stock on the Island Line.

London Underground rolling stock seems to have a longevity, that other trains seem to have been built without!

Or is it that as the elderly fleets of the Glasgow Subway, Merseyrail and the Northern City Line seem to keep soldiering on, that spending a large proportion of your working life underground, is good for trains?

 

July 5, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment

What Is It With The Welsh And Batteries?

If ordering two fleets of rail vehicles with batteries, that I wrote about in The Greening Of The Valleys, KeolisAmey Wales have now gone and ordered a third fleet for North Wales.

This article in the Railway Gazette is entitled Vivarail D-Trains For Wales & Borders.

This is the first paragraph.

Incoming Wales & Borders franchisee KeolisAmey is to take delivery of five three-car Class 230 D-Train diesel-battery multiple-units from Vivarail, which is to produce them using the bogies and aluminium bodyshells of withdrawn London Underground D78 metro trains.

Note that they are described as diesel-battery trains.

The article says the Class 230 trains will be used on these lines.

Five trains have been ordered, but I suspect it will eventually be more.

I believe that this picture shows a property of the Class 230 train, that would be ideal for Welsh routes or any other scenic lines.

They have large windows and get the interior design right and they could become an iconic way to fill a difficult niche market.

  • A reliable hourly or half-hourly service on a remote line.
  • A quality interior with everything customers expect like a fully-accessible toilet, wi-fi and power sockets.
  • Space for bikes, buggies, babies and wheel-chairs.
  • Step-free entry between train and platform was possible at some stations on the District Line and I suspect that many stations could be made, so that wheelchairs and buggies could just roll across.
  • The ability to be serviced remotely.

Note that the train is fitted with toilets from Cwmbran in South Wales.

Did Transport for Wales say, that if you fitted Welsh toilets, we’ll buy a few trains?

I suspect though, that they are much better toilets, than those I saw as a child in castles like Caernarfon, Conway and Harlech, where the inhabitants in the Middle Ages must have been quick on the job to avoid the getting shot with arrows, where it would hurt!

I suspect constipation was rare in those days!

Seriously though, here’s a video of the Class 230 trains for Wales.

This video comes from this article in this article on Wrexham.com.

How Do The Trains Work?

I obviously don’t know exactly, but I suspect the method of operation is very similar to that of some of the advanced hybrid buses, like a new Routemaster.

Each of the diesel engines have a generator, which produces electricity. This can either be fed directly to the traction motors to power the train or stored in the onboard battery.

The train’s control system manages the power and chooses, whether traction power comes from the diesel engine or the battery.

This means that the diesel engines don’t have to work all the time.

June 8, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , | Leave a comment

D-Train Order For Marston Vale Confirmed

The title of this post, is the same as the title of an article in the April 2018 Edition of Modern Railways.

It gives a few more details on the order from West Midlands Trains for three Class 230 trains to provide the service on the Marston Vale Line.

  • The trains will be in operation in December 2018
  • Two trains will operate the daily service.
  • The trains will be diesel-powered.

When the trains come into operation, extra early morning and late-night services will be added from Monday to Saturday.

Battery Prototype

The article also gives more details of the battery prototype.

  • The train has four battery rafts, each with a capacity of 106 kWh
  • Range is up to fifty miles with a ten minute charge at each end of the journey.
  • Range will increase as battery technology improves.
  • The train is charged using a patented automatic charging point.
  • The batteries will have a seven-year lifespan, backed by a full warranty.
  • Battery rafts would appear to be interchangeable with the diesel generators.
  • Hydrogen power will be used within the next few years.

The specification seems comprehensive and it would appear there is a high degree of innovative automation and well-thought-out electrical engineering.

Train Energy Consumption

The train has the following characteristics.

  • Two cars
  • 424 kWh of battery capacity.
  • 50 mile range

This gives a consumption 4.24 kWh/per car/per mile.

In an article in the October 2017 Edition of Modern Railways, which is entitled Celling England By The Pound, Ian Walmsley says this in relation to trains running on the Uckfield Branch, which is probably not much more taxing than the Marston Vale Line.

A modern EMU needs between 3 and 5 kWh per vehicle mile for this sort of service.

I am surprised that the Class 230 train lies in the 3-5 kWh range, but then I’m not sure of the weights of the two trains.

I estimate two-car units to weigh as follows.

  • Class 230 train plus batteries – Around 50 tonnes.
  • Electrostar – Around 90 tonnes
  • Aventra – Around 80 tonnes

I shall get some better figures, when I actually see the trains, as the weight is on the side.

The Pop-Up Train

The article talks of the concept of a low-cost pop-up train as a solution for a regional or commuter train.

Export To America?

This pop-up train could be designed to be used to demonstrate rail services in America.

Henry Posner, who is promoting the train in America is quoted as saying cities could use the train to test possible services with passengers on board ‘for less than the cost of a consultant’s study into a possible service’.

These demonstrations will be on freight lines, where for reasons of safety, the passengers trains would run during the day and freight trains at night.

Is America ready for an invasion of remanufactured forty-year-old London Underground D78 Stock trains?

 

 

March 22, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Commitment To West London Orbital Rail Line

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article in Global Rail News.

This is the first three paragraphs of the article.

A new West London Orbital rail line has been included in a revised 25-year Transport Strategy for the city.

Its addition follows a public consultation. The document describes an extension of the Overground network connecting Hounslow with Cricklewood and Hendon via Old Oak, Neasden and Brent Cross.

The line would reinstate a regular passenger service on the Dudding Hill line, which links Acton and Cricklewood.

I like this proposal and I wrote about the railway in New Railway Line For West London Proposed.

In the related post, I said this about building the line.

This is no Crossrail or HS2, where billions need to be spent.

The three largest sub-projects would be.

Electrification of the Dudding Hill Line, if it is to be done.
Resignalling of the Dudding Hill Line.
Necessary track replacement and updating.
In addition, there are around ten station projects.

There will also be a need for up to perhaps sixteen Class 710 trains. This could be around £90-100 million.

Since, I wrote that, things have moved on.

Trains

The first order for Class 230 trains has been placed, giving them credibility.

They could do the short routes on batteries.

But if these trains can do it on batteries, why can’t Class 710 trains?

So that means no new electrification!

Stations

Some of the stations, that will need to be built or modified, like Harlesden or Neasden, sit on sizeable brownfield sites.

Surely, property developers can be persuaded to build a station underneath much-needed housing.

It’s all about good design and very much in the Mayor’s thinking and the property developers’ interests!

Project Management

Get this right and, the line could be built simply and reasonably quickly.

The West London Orbital could be built to the following specification.

  • No full electrification.
  • Battery trains.
  • Platforms long enough for four-car Class 710 trains.
  • Bay platforms with possible charging at West Hampstead, Hendon, Hounslow and Kew Bridge stations.
  • Four tph on both routes.

It lends itself to a very efficient way of building the railway.

  1. Update the tracks and signalling as required on the route.
  2. Build a platform on the freight line through West Hampstead Thameslink station.
  3. Build a bay platform that will accept a four-car train at Hounslow station.
  4. Establish a four tph shuttle service between West Hampstead  Thameslink and Hounslow stations calling at Acton Central, South Acton, Brentford, Syon Lane and Isleworth.
  5. Stations could be built at Neasden, Harlesden and Old Oak Common, where there is a generous amount of brownfield land, with lots of space for housing above the tracks and platforms.
  6. Add a bay platform at Hendon and Kew Bridge stations.
  7. Establish a second four tph shuttle service between Hendon and Kew Bridge stations calling at Neasden, Harlesden, Old Oak Common, Acton Central and South Acton.

Note.

  1. Batteries would be charged South of Acton Central using the existing third-rail electrification.
  2. About five miles of the route would not be electrified.
  3. Housing developments on top of a station are a property developers dream.

The service could be started using Class 230 trains, with the option to switch to four-car Class 710 trains, powered by batteries, when more capacity is needed and Bombardier have fully developed the battery Aventra.

March 6, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , | 1 Comment

Will London Overground Procure Some Class 230 Trains?

Transport for London has a cash flow problem caused by various factors.

  • The reduction in grant from Central Government.
  • A fall in bus revenue caused by traffic congestion.
  • The freeze of fares by the Mayor.
  • The need to add services to stimulate much-needed housing.

This article in Rail Magazine is entitled Vivarail’s D-Trains Confirmed For Bedford-Bletchley.

As West Midlands Trains have now confirmed the order for the Class 230 trains, does this mean that buying Vivarail’s innovative refurbished London Underground D78 Stock, is now a less-risky train purchase?

Battery Or Diesel Class 230 Trains?

Would Transport for London buy a diesel or battery version of the Class 230 train?

Transport for London will have an exclusively electric fleet in a few months, when they have passed the Class 172 trains to West Midlands Trains.

I can’t believe they’d want to buy a small number of diesel trains, so I suspect they’ll go for battery versions.

Advantages Of Class 230 Trains For Transport for London

The trains must have advantages for Transport for London.

  • They are simple trains, built for remote servicing.
  • In some applications, their short length of just two cars must help, in that expensive platform extensions will not be needed.
  • I would suspect that one two-car train is designed to rescue another.
  • Capacity can be increased by adding a third-car.
  • Transport for London must also have a lot of expertise on how to get the most out of these trains.

Possible Routes

There are a handful of possible routes.

Greenford Branch Line

The Greenford Branch Line must be a prime candidate for running with two-car battery version of a Class 230 train.

Consider.

  • Using a four-car train, like a Class 710 train would require the platform at Greenford to be lengthened.
  • A Class 230 train would only need some form of simple electrification at Greenford and/or West Ealing stations.
  • Class 230 trains, would probably fit all platforms easily and give level access for wheelchairs and buggies.
  • Could London Overground’s third-rail engineers add suitable electrification to charge the batteries at Greenford station?
  • The branch is only four kilometres long.
  • The branch only has the two tph passenger service and the occasional freight train.
  • All trains use the new bay platform at West Ealing station.

One train could obviously work the current two trains per hour (tph) timetable, but could two trains and a possible spare run a four tph service on the branch?

The advantages of using Class 230 trains over a more conventional approach using perhaps Class 710 trains would include.

  • No electrification of the branch.
  • No platform lengthening and possibly little platform modification.
  • Only a short length of third-rail electrification would be needed to charge the batteries.
  • A four tph service might be possible.

The big advantage would be that it would be a low-cost project.

Romford To Upminster Line

The Romford To Upminster Line is currently run by a single four-car Class 315 train, which was to be replaced by a new Class 710 train.

In the March 2018 Edition of Modern Railways, whilst discussing nine more Class 71 trains for the London Overground, it is said, that a Class 315 train will be retained for the Romford To Upminster Line.

Why not procure another Class 230 train and use that to shuttle along the branch?

Consider.

  • The electrification can be removed from the line, to save maintenance costs.
  • A short length of third-rail electrification can be used to charge the batteries at Upminster station.
  • The trains could be stabled at Upminster Depot.

The line used to have a short passing loop between Romford and Emerson Park station, that could be long enough for a two-car Class 230 train. If this loop were to be reinstated without electrification, if might allow a four tph service.

It would be another low-cost project.

Bromley North Line

The Bromley North Line is currently served by Southeastern.

Reading Wikipedia for the line, I get the impression, that the line isn’t a major problem, but there are little annoyances.

  • Services are not frequent enough at some times of the day and week.
  • Connection to services to and from London aren’t always convenient.
  • It is not the easiest branch to provide with trains and drivers.

In addition, Southeastern would appear to be amenable to pass the line to Transport for London.

The track layout for the line has the following characteristics.

  • Double-track throughout.
  • There is a single platform at Grove Park station.
  • There are two platforms at Bromley North station.
  • The intermediate station; Sundridge Park has two platforms.

It looks like the line was designed so that two trains can operate simultaneously.

  • Two Class 230 trains could run a four tph service.
  • Stabling and servicing could be in Bromley North station.
  • Trains could be third-rail or battery.
  • A spare train could be held ready if it was felt needed.

It would be a self-contained low-cost solution.

Epping To Ongar

The Epping to Ongar service on the Central Line is no more, but would it be viable now with a Class 230 train?

Brentford Branch Line

The Brentford Branch Line has been proposed for reopening.

Class 230 trains powered by batteries would be ideal rolling stock.

The trains would be charged in Southall station.

West London Orbital

This article on Global Rail News is entitled Commitment To West London Orbital rail line.

This is said.

A press release distributed by the office of London Mayor Sadiq Khan said: “This new line, delivered through TfL, the West London Alliance, boroughs and Network Rail, could potentially support the delivery of an additional 20,000 homes, as well as employment growth in west London.”

In this article on Ian Visits, this is said about the service on the proposed West London Orbital line.

Phase 1: 4 trains per hour from West Hampstead to Hounslow, calling at West Hampstead, Cricklewood, Neasden, Harlesden, OOC, Acton Central, South Acton, Brentford, Syon Lane, Isleworth, Hounslow.

Phase 2: additional 4 trains per hour from Hendon to Kew Bridge, calling at Hendon, Brent Cross/Staples Corner, Neasden, Harlesden, OOC, Acton Central, South Acton, Kew Bridge.

The track is all in place and with a new bay platform at Hounslow, Class 230 trains could work Phase 1 on batteries with ease.

The key to the intermediate stations is property development. At Neasden, Harlesden and Old Oak Common, there is a lot of spare land around the Dudding Hill Line, where the trains will run. Developers will be told to build an appropriate amount of housing with a new station underneath.

The West London Orbital could be built to the following specification.

  • No full electrification.
  • Battery trains.
  • Platforms long enough for four-car Class 710 trains.
  • Bay platforms with possible charging at West Hampstead, Hendon, Hounslow and Key Bridge stations.
  • Four tph on both routes.

It lends itself to a very efficient way of building the railway.

  1. Build a platform on the freight line through West Hampstead Thameslink station.
  2. Build a bay platform that will accept a four-car train at Hounslow station.
  3. Establish a four tph shuttle service between West Hampstead  Thameslink and Hounslow stations calling at Acton Central, South Acton, Brentford, Syon Lane and Isleworth.
  4. Stations could be built at Neasden, Harlesden and Old Oak Common, where there is a generous amount of brownfield land, with lots of space for housing above the tracks and platforms.

Note.

  1. Batteries would be charged between Acton Central and Hounslow using the existing third-rail electrification.
  2. About five miles of the route would not be electrified.
  3. Housing developments on top of a station are a property developers dream.

The service could be started using Class 230 trains, with the option to switch to four-car Class 710 trains, powered by batteries, when more capacity is needed and Bombardier have fully developed the battery Aventra.

Phase two of the project would need development of platforms at Hendon and Kew Bridge stations.

The beauty of the West London Orbital, is that the only costs for Transport for London are four new platforms, some track-work and a fleet of new trains.

Hopefully, the development of the intermediate stations would be down to property developers, as they will make a fortune out of the housing!

Conclusion

I think the answer to my original question posed in the title of this post is Yes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 3, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Vivarail To Supply Three D-Trains To West Midlands Trains

The title of this post is the same as this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

This order has been a long time coming and the three Class 230 trains will be used by West Midlands Trains on the Marston Vale Line, from December 2018.

Whether they will be diesel or battery versions of the Class 230 trains is not stated.

March 1, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Enlightening Facts On Battery Trains

This article In Rail Magazine is entitled Vivarail Targets Summer Running For New Battery Unit.

The article says some enlightening things about the battery version of the Class 230 train.

  • Four batteries are provided on the two-car train.
  • The total battery capacity is 106 kWh.
  • An eight minute recharge is needed at the end of each run.
  • A ten minute recharge gives a range of fifty miles.

Nothing is said of the speed and acceleration of the train on battery power.

How would these figures fit Vivarail’s order for three trains from West Midlands Trains to serve the Marston Vale Line?

  • The route is approximately twenty-five miles long.
  • Trains currently take forty-three minutes with ten stops.
  • Overhead electrification could be available at both ends of the line, as both Bedford and Bletchley station are on 25 KVAC  main lines.

Do the sums!

February 22, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Riding Docklands Light Railway Trains In Essen

This may seem an unusual title, but look at these pictures.

These are the original Docklands Light Railway trains, that were sold to Essen, who rebuilt them for the Essen Stadtbahn.

Note how they have been converted from third-rail to overhead electrification.

Some of our trains will be scrapped when they retire, like probably the Class 314 trains in Scotland and the Class 315 trains in London, but many like London Underground’s  D78 Stock, which are being converted into Class 230 trains will find new jobs to do.

This article on Trains Magazine is entitled Pittsburgh-based Company Looks To Test ‘pop-up’ Transit Options In The UK And US.

It describes how they plan to use Class 230 trains, to develop rail services in the US.

This is the first paragraph.

U.S. Railroad investor Henry Posner III and his Railroad Development Corp. have plans to bring rebuilt self-powered former London subway cars to the U.S. to enable cities to introduce low cost rail transit on existing, lightly used freight routes.

I wish Henry well!

But I do think, that a lot of older trains will be recycled to other profitable and worthwhile uses, away from the UK.

Most people would sniff at driving to wor every dayk in a 1980s-built car, but many travel to work in a quality train of the same era.

The difference is that most cars are built for a life of perhaps ten years, so you will buy another,

UK trains, (Pacers excepted!) were built with a design lifetime of forty or even fifty years.

Some mid-life updates and refurbishments have confused passengers into thinking they were new trains.

We should think of trains much more like houses than cars, when it comes to refurbishment.

Over the next few years, we will see some inteesting recycling of redundant British rolling stock.

 

 

February 16, 2018 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

A Video About The Class 230 Battery Train

This article on InsideEVs has a rather good video of the Class 230 train demonstrator, which is entitled Fully Charged Checks Out A Battery Powered Train.

Very interesting!

The video was made by Robert Llewellyn of Fully Charged.

 

 

December 28, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , | Leave a comment

Can Class 230 Trains Work On Third Rail Electrified Lines?

London Underground’s D78 Stock used to share tracks between Gunnerbury and Richmond stations with London Overground’s Class 378 trains.

So the answer to my question used to be yes and I suspect that the Class 230 trains could be configured, so that they could still run on third-rail electrified lines.

Running A Service Using Class 230 Trains

Now that West Midlands Trains have ordered three Class 230 trains for the Marston Vale Line, I think we can see how operators could use the trains.

  • The operator has enough trains to run the service, even if one train is out of service for routine maintenance or repair.
  • The trains are stored overnight in a convenient siding or terminal station.
  • The trains will be supported by probably a well-designed service vehicle and if needed a fuel bowser.
  • The trains will be refurbished to a high standard, with wi-fi, power sockets and universal access toilets.
  • Vivarail have talked about on-board drinks machines.
  • Drivers and support staff would probably come from the local area.

You could even envisage a train with an onboard ticket machine.

Would A Third-Rail Ability Be Any Use?

Consider the following lines.

Bromley North Branch Line

The Bromley North Branch Line is a short branch line between Grove Park and Bromley North stations.

  • Service is three trains per hour from Mondays to Saturdays.
  • There is no service on Sundays.
  • Bromley North station is Grade II Listed and has a ticket office.
  • The branch is double-track and fully electrified with one intermediate station.
  • The service is run by a two-car Class 466 train, which travels to the line each morning.
  • The Class 230 train has a higher passenger-focused specification than the twenty-year-old Class 466 train.

I believe that one Class 230 train could run the existing service, but as Bromley North station has two platforms, that two trains could run a four trains per hour service.

I also believe that the Grade II Listed station could be released for sympathetic development, by doing the following.

  • Improving the automatic ticketing facilities and perhaps putting ticket machines on the trains.
  • Closing the ticket office.
  • Putting staff on the platform to assist passengers who need help.

The station could become a transport hub with cafes and stops catering for the needs of train travellers and those using the many buses serving the station.

The South Eastern franchise is up for renewal in the next couple of years, and I think that those bidding will have ideas about what to do the the Bromley North Branch Line.

Lymington Branch Line

The Lymington branch line  runs between Brockenhurst and Lymington Pier.

  • Service is normally two trains per hour between Brockenhurst and Lymington Pier
  • The branch is single track and fully electrified.
  • The service is run by a Class 158, Class 159 or Class 450 train.
  • Brockenhurdst has a comprehensive four trains per hour service  between London/Southampton and Bournemouth.

I believe that one Class 230 trains could run the existing service. With the addition of a passing loop, two trains may be able to run a four trains per hour service.

Sheerness Line

The Sheerness Line runs from Sittingbourne station to Sheerness station across the Isle of Sheppey.

  • Service is normally two trains per hour between Sittingbourne and Sheerness.
  • There are extra services between Victoriia and Sheeness in the Peak.
  • The branch is partly double-track and fully electrified with four intermediate stations.
  • Sheerness station has two platforms.
  • The shuttle service is run by a two-car Class 466 train.
  • Sittingbourne has a comprehensive six trains per hour service to and from London, with extra peak hour services.

As with the Bromley North Branch Line, the Class 230 train has a higher passenger-focused specification than the current Class 466 train.

I believe that two Class 230 trains could run the existing service, but as Sheerness station has two platforms and the route is partly double-track, that an extra train or two, could see the service upgraded to three or even four trains per hour.

Conclusion

I suspect that we’ll see Class 230 trains considered for lines with third-rail electrification.

 

 

 

October 20, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , | Leave a comment