The Anonymous Widower

Green Hydrogen For Scotland

The title of this post, has been taken from this press release from ITM Power, which is entitled ‘Green Hydrogen For Scotland’ To Help Reach Net Zero Targets: First Project To Deliver A 10MW Electrolyser To Glasgow Facility.

This is the introductory paragraph.

A pioneering Strategic partnership has been established to create new green hydrogen production facilities with clusters of refuelling stations across Scotland, supporting the country’s efforts to achieve net zero by 2045. ‘Green Hydrogen for Scotland’ – a partnership of ScottishPower Renewables, BOC (a Linde company) and ITM Power – brings together industry-leading names in the renewables and clean fuel industries to offer an end-to-end market solution for reducing vehicle emissions through the provision of green hydrogen.

Other details include.

  • The green hydrogen production facility located on the outskirts of Glasgow will be operated by BOC.
  • ITM Power will deliver a 10 MW electrolyser.
  • Electricity will come from , wind and solar produced by ScottishPower Renewables.
  • The project aims to supply hydrogen to the commercial market within the next two years.

This ITM Power infographic outlines Green Hydrogen for Scotland.

Surely it should be called tartan hydrogen. Does anybody know a tartan containing the blue of Scotland, the white of Yorkshire and the black, red and gold of Germany?

September 16, 2020 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Scotland’s First Hydrogen-Powered Train Showcased At COP26 Summit

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article in the Scotsman.

This is the introductory paragraph.

The zero emission train project will demonstrate how the country’s railways could be decarbonised by phasing out diesel within 15 years.

The train will be based on a withdrawn Class 314 train.

These trains entered service in 1979 and are certainly not the worst of that generation of British Rail electric trains.

It will be a tight timetable to get the train ready for the COP26 summit, which is scheduled for November 1-12 in 2021.

September 12, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green Bus Maker Reveals Plan For Scottish Hydrogen Fuel Production Facility

\the title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the Herald.

Thwaw are the introductory paragraphs.

Jo Bamford, chief of Ryse Hydrogen, has revealed plans to create a hydrogen production facility in Scotland.

He said the production unit will be sited outside Glasgow and it is expected to be operational by November next year when the rescheduled COP26 climate event is due to take place in the city.

Mr Bamford earlier said Glasgow could run 300 hydrogen-powered buses, while Aberdeen is set put a fleet of hydrogen powered double deckers on the road.

You can’t fault Jo Bamford’s ambitions.

August 19, 2020 Posted by | Hydrogen, Transport | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Election 2019: DUP Manifesto At A Glance

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on the BBC.

This is said under Infrastructure.

The infamous bridge from Northern Ireland to Scotland makes an appearance in the manifesto. It has been mooted on a number of occasions, despite a number of potential barriers to its construction.

Not everyone believes those barriers are insurmountable, though.

I don’t and feel strongly, that the bridge should be built and linked to High Speed Two

  • London and Belfast in four hours
  • London and Dublin in five hours.
  • Belfast and Glasgow in under two hours.

Not forgetting, it would become an important freight route..

 

 

December 2, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Virgin Reports Record Modal Shift From Planes To Trains

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Rail News.

This paragraph sums up the shift from plane to train.

The operator said rail had a 29 per cent share of the traffic during the 12 months to July this year, and that annual passenger numbers on the route have now reached 700,000, compared with 244,000 ten years ago.

Virgin seem to say it’s all down to them, but various factors with flying are having an effect.

  • Airport delays due to drones and other operational problems.
  • In the case of Glasgow, the lack of a rail link to the airport, might encourage passengers to go the whole way by train.
  • Improved Railcard offerings.
  • Climate change awareness and guilt.
  • Ryanair’s problems.
  • Glaswegians taking long haul flights from Scotland and Manchester, rather than London.
  • Better awareness of rail travel.

I also wonder, if Scotland’s extensive electrification and large numbers of new trains has convinced a lot more Scots to travel by train.

I should also say, that my Scottish friends seem to be using trains rather than flying more often.

Conclusion

Let’s hope that when West Coast Rail take over on December 8th, 2019, the upward trend of market share continues, as it is surely better for the planet.

November 11, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Gluten-Free Breakfast At Amarone In Edinburgh

I had my gluten free breakfast in Amarone in Edinburgh a couple of weeks ago.

I would certainly go back again.

  • Service was friendly.
  • Price was reasonable.
  • Food was excellent.
  • Tea was at it should be in a pot!

It was a bit quiet, but that was probably due to the early hour.

I’ll certainly use their restaurant in Glasgow as well!

August 21, 2019 Posted by | Food | , , | Leave a comment

Row Erupts Over Decision To Scrap Glasgow Rail Link For Transport Pods

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Global Construction Review.

This is the first two paragraphs.

A row has broken out over a decision to cancel a direct rail link between Glasgow Airport and the town of Paisely, just east of Glasgow, in favour of exploring a self-driving transportation pod system.

The direct rail link was announced as part of a £1.1bn investment in the Glasgow City Region deal agreed in 2014 and was expected to be operational by 2025.

I am not sure, which system I prefer, but then I’m a rather different type of airport traveller.

  • I generally travel alone.
  • I rarely have anything more than a man-bag and a small hold-all.
  • I want convenience and can easily walk up to a kilometre with my hold-all.
  • I only fly Ryanair as an airline of last resort.

But what annoys me most, is if to get to the Airport, I have to scratch around buying a ticket for the link from the station to the Airport.

At all London Airports, except Luton, you buy a ticket to the airport station or use a contactless card.

Luton is introducing an automated shuttle between the airport and Luton Airport Parkway station and if it is not free, I’ll never use the airport.

A Tram-Train Rail Link

Edinburgh and Manchester Airports have tram links between the Airport and the City Centre, so I can’t see any problems with a tram-train link, that instead of dropping you on the street in the City Centre, as a tram would do, drops you in a railway station.

The way Manchester is thinking about tram-trains, I wouldn’t be surprised to see them at Manchester Airport.

Based on what I have seen in Sheffield, I don’t believe there would be any serious problems developing a tram-train link to Glasgow Airport..

However, these could be issues.

  • Is there enough spare capacity on the Inverclyde Line?
  • The tram-train link would go to Paisley Gilmore Street and Glasgow Central stations, but what if your local train service to Glasgow goes to Glasgow Queen Street station.

Would many people still use their cars to get to the Airport?

A Pod System

I wrote about the proposed pod system for Glasgow Airport in An Innovative Scheme For A Rail Link To Glasgow Airport.

It has its plus points, but I worry that getting the right number of pods to provide a good service might be tricky.

Would many people still use their cars to get to the Airport?

IThe Connection In Glasgow

Glasgow’s problem is that both these links connect into the centre of Glasgow at Glasgow Central station.

So if your connection to Glasgow comes into Glasgow Queen Street station, you will have to hump your bags across the City Centre.

A plan has existed for years to create Crossrail Glasgow, which would make matters easier.

But nothing has so far been decided.

Conclusion

There is no point in building any form of link to Glasgow Airport, unless Crossrail Glasgow is built.

Otherwise, passengers with an indirect route to Glasgow Central station will still drive or avoid the airport entirely.

 

 

 

February 8, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Anniesland And Glasgow Queen Street Via Maryhill In A Class 230 Train

In Issue 864 of Rail Magazine there is an article about the Class 230 train demonstration in Scotland, that I wrote about in Battery Class 230 Train Demonstration At Bo’ness And Kinneil Railway.

This is the first paragraph.

Vivarail is targeting Scottish routes such as Glasgow Queen Street-Anniesland via Maryhill for its converted London Underground D-Stock, now known as Class 230s.

The Maryhill Line is a short line between Anniesland and Glasgow Queen Street stations.

  • There is a shuttle service of two trains per hour, which appear to take about twenty minutes each way.
  • There are six intermediate stations
  • The line is not electrified and is run by a two-car diesel train.
  • Various works have been performed on the line in recent years to make it more useful and easy to operate.

So why has this short line not been electrified?

On Rail Forums, various reasons are put forward including.

  • The Maryhill Line might not have the traffic for a three-car electric train.
  • It could be a rather tricky electrification.
  • There are also issues with lower-powered diesel trains climbing the incline out of Queen Street station, which seem to make creating a diagram for trains on the Maryhill Line difficult.

I suspect that for air quality reasons, Transport Scotland would like to have less diesel trains in city centres.

So a self-contained independently-powered two-car train, shuttling between Queen Street and Anniesland may be a viable solution?

Would battery-powered Class 230 train be able to work the route?

  • The trains would be the right size.
  • They would be emission-free and quiet.
  • The performance of the Class 230 train is probably enough to work the current service.
  • Third-rail charging would be possible in the bay platform at Anniesland station.
  • If required a charging rail could be added in Queen Street station.
  • The platform at Anniesland station could be long enough to stable two trains overnight.
  • Except for the charging systems, no new infrastructure would be required.

It could turn out to be another quirky, useful and reliable railway to add to the Glasgow Subway.

 

October 25, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , , , , | 6 Comments

Paisley St. James Station

Paisley St. James station is the nearest station to Glasgow Airport and any rail-based service to the Airport will probably effect services through the station.

It is not the best equipped of stations.

  • The bridge is not step-free.
  • It appeared not to have any ticket office or staff.
  • There was a rudimentary shelter.
  • Services are about one train every thirty minutes.

I suspect, it could be a really nice station on a blustery wet day!

September 7, 2018 Posted by | Transport | , | 1 Comment

Moving Football From Hampden To Murrayfield Is Vandalism

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article in The Scotsman.

I’m not bothered, as I doubt, I’ll ever go to Scotland to watch an important Scottish football match, that would be played at their National Stadium.

But, I have been to Hampden Park before.

I was there fifty years ago, when Spurs and Celtic drew 3-3 in the Glasgow Cup. I also suspect that the 91,000 plus crowd was the largest, I’ve ever been part of.

And I was at Hampden to see the athletics in the 2014 Commonwealth Games.

I have no view on the historic aspects of the possible move, except that there might be an economic case.

And I also note, France, the Republic of Ireland and Wales all have a stadium, that is shared between football and rugby.

But then Germany and Italy don’t have a national stadium for football.

I can see another big argument between Edinburgh and Glasgow on this decision.

Other the last decade though, transport links between and to and from Scotland’s two major cities have changed.

  • There have been extensions to the road network across Scotland.
  • The rail lines are being electrified and new higher-capacity Class 385 trains are being delivered.
  • Passenger numbers at both Glasgow and Edinburgh Airports have grown.

So at least getting to either stadium is becoming easier.

It will be a difficult decision to call.

August 29, 2018 Posted by | Sport, Transport | , , , , , | Leave a comment