The Anonymous Widower

Will Britain Negotiate With A United Europe?

In this article on the BBC, which is entitled EU chief Jean-Claude Juncker ‘will not seek second term’, this is said.

Mr Juncker also said the UK could divide opinion among EU leaders once Brexit negotiations begin.

I think that will be highly likely, as putting 27 people in a room and asking themany question, will give several different answers.

Last year, I wrote Brexit – Signalling Implications For The UK, which was based on an an article on Rail Engineer.

This is a paragraph from the article, which talks about implementing signalling post-Brexit.

The endless committees to discuss and agree how the standards will be implemented do not get in the way. Whilst not suitable for main line usage (at least in the foreseeable future), there could be suburban routes around cities (for example Merseyrail) that could benefit from CBTC deployment.

I know it is talking about one small part of railway signalling, but if the states of Europe can’t agree a common position on that, how will they agree a common position on how to deal with the UK during and after Brexit?

In some ways, the biggest problem with Brexit, is that we will still be arguing about the details of the settlement well into the 2030s and beyond.

I can see some absolutely silly arguments going on and on!

 

February 12, 2017 Posted by | World | , | Leave a comment

The Adverse Effects Of Electric Vehicles

This article in theMail OnLine has one of those titles which are all you need to read.

UK could need 20 more nuclear power stations if electric cars take over our roads and cause ‘massive strain’ on power network

There is also a similar article in The Times.

The articles are based on research by Transport for London.

The article has a point and TfL have done the sums.

Consider the future.

At present London doesn’t apply the full Congestion Charge for electric vehicles and they get other discounts. So as electric vehicles get more affordable and with a longer range, it will be sensible to purchase an electric vehicle and take advantage of using it at a discount in London.

So will London be grid-locked by electric vehicles?

We may get cleaner air, but how will all those, who depend on buses and taxis get through all this congestion?

Many of these new electric cars will be driverless, which will increase their attraction and just add to the congestion.

All of these vehicles will also need to be charged, so will we see every parking space fitted with a charging point.

Who is going to pay for these points?

And then as Transport for London say, just providing enough electricity for London’s transport, will require two nuclear power stations.

So how about using hydrogen fuel cells to power these vehicles?

But to create the hydrogen you need electricity to electrolyse water. So more nuclear power stations?

So what will we do?

London is lucky, in that compared to other cities in the UK, it has an extensive public transport network that works, that people like to use.

So Crossrail 2 and possibly 3 and 4, if properly designed can take the pressure off London, to allow space for driverless electric buses and taxis, and a severely restricted number of other vehicles.

Just as people are now complaining that they were told by the Government to buy a diesel car and now they are being abused as polluters, in a decade or so, those buying electric cars will be abused as congesters.

Owning a car in the future will become an increasingly expensive and annoying business.

 

February 12, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , , , , | 1 Comment

Now That’s What I Call A Mega Bendy Bus!

Bendy buses weren’t liked in London and although some places in Europe have them, they are nothing like the mega-bendies from Brazil discussed in this article on Global Rail News, which is entitled New mega-buses to replace trams?.

This is the opening paragraph.

Could advances in bus design threaten the role of trams on busy routes? New, longer designs which carry more passengers and combine flexibility with vast capacity.

On the other hand, I don’t see why a bendy bus with driving cabs at each end, running in a dedicated traffic lane or perhaps in a concrete guided busway couldn’t be used on a fixed link between say a railway station and the centre of a city. A double-ended design would eliminate the need to turn the bus, which is a big space-hungry  problem

I think that once, one city, airport or attraction develops this idea successfully, then the idea could spread!

The chassis developed by Volvo in Brazil mentioned in the article, would certainly be a good starting point.

February 12, 2017 Posted by | Travel | , | Leave a comment