The Anonymous Widower

Peckham Rye Station To Go Step-Free

This document on the Government web site is entitled Access for All: 73 Stations Set To Benefit From Additional Funding.

Peckham Rye station is on the list.

These are some pictures of Peckham Rye station.

This Google Map shows the complicated nature of the station.

I think making the station step-free will be rather a challenge.

Especially, as the station is Grade II Listed.

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

An Ungated Entrance Used To Create Step-Free Access At Crofton Park Station

Crofton Park station is not step-free and has the usual staiircases.

As I passed through today, I noticed that an ungated entrance had been used to create step-free access.

Passengers are expected to touch-in and out on the touch pads.

I suspect most do!

But it’s a clever idea to build an affordable step-free entrance.

I suspect this type of entrance might become more common in the Oyster-card area.

After all, there are several Overground stations without ticket gates.

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 2 Comments

Some Trains Only Have Door Controls On One Side Of The Double Door

On Saturday, I was on a very crowded train and needed to get out.

But I couldn’t as there were so many people in the doorway., that I couldn’t reach the door controls, which were only on one side.

Eventually, someone else pushed the button.

I noticed today, that Class 700 trains only have conmtrols on one side.

These buttons should be on both sides.

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , | Leave a comment

Catford Station To Go Step-Free

This document on the Government web site is entitled Access for All: 73 Stations Set To Benefit From Additional Funding.

Catford station is on the list.

This pictures show the current state of Catford station.

Note.

  1. The railway line is on an embankment, with a bridge over the road.
  2. There are steep stairs to both platforms.
  3. There are small shelters on both platforms.
  4. There is a small station building by the subway under the tracks.

I suspect that a lift on either side of the tracks will need to be installed.

This Google Map shows the station.

It looks like it will be rather a tight squeeze to fit the lifts around the stairs and the current station building.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see a rebuild of the current station building and the stairs, to create space for the lifts.

The route between Catford and Catford Bridge stations used to involve a walk along the A205, but now there is a level walk through a new housing development, which also has a small supermarket.

You enter Catford Bridge station, directly onto Platform 1.

This Google Map shows the two stations and the walking route between them.

I estimate that it is less than a hundred metres.

Adding step-free access at Catford station will not complete the project.

Look at these pictures of Catford Bridge station.

To cross the tracks at the station, there are two bridges; the road bridge and a footbridge at the station.

Neither of the bridges are step-free.

It would be difficult to add lifts at the A205 end of the station, as there is little space. It would also mean passengers would be walking along the A205, with all its traffic and associated pollution.

In Winner Announced In The Network Rail Footbridge Design Ideas Competition, I wrote how the competition was won by this bridge.

So could a factory-built bridge like this be installed at Catford Bridge station?

It could replace the existing metal bridge!

 

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Steps At Dalston Junction Station

Dalston Junction is a four-platform station and these are the only stairs at the station.

I think the design is excellent.

  • They serve all four platforms, so you can’t go the wrong way!
  • They are very wide, so have a high capacity.
  • There are effectively four handrails for those like me, who want or need to hold on.
  • Fit travellers who can lift their case, can use the stairs.
  • There is a landing half-way up.
  • The stairs are well-lit.
  • in 2017-2018, the stairs handled nearly six million passengers.
  • The small number of interchange passengers don’t need to use the stairs and walk between platforms on the level.
  • The steps are Transport for London’s typical low-slip design.
  • At the bottom of the staircase, there is a wide landing area with two train information displays and a 20-30 metre walks to the four platforms.
  • At the top of the staircase there is a wide lobby, with the wide gate-line in front of passengers coming up the stairs.
  • There is usually, a member of the station staff watching the passenger flows and answering any questions.

But above all there is a single lift about ten-twenty metres from the stairs, so avoiding the stairs is easy and obvious.

I have seen few stairs in stations as well-designed as these.

A few more general observations.

Wide Stairs With A Double Rail In the Middle

This design of stairs is being increasingly seen in London and around Europe.

In Stairs And A Lift At Cannon Street Station, I show a similar installation.

But there are loads like this monstrosity at Bethnal Green station in Before Overground – Stairs Not Fit For Purpose.

How many stations could be improved by widening the staircase?

Probably quite a few, but many staircases are constrained within solid walls.

Handrails

Transport for London generally use round and easy-to-grip handrails.

These are the best I’ve seen, which are on the Amsterdam Metro.

Some on British Rail-era stations are big and square and must be difficult for those with small or frail hands.

An Obvious Lift

At Dalston Junction, the lift is obvious as you approach the stairs.

But in some stations, the lifts are at the other end of the platform.

The Greenford Solution

These pictures show the solution at Greenford station.

Note.

  1. There is an up-escalator.
  2. A staircase,which is as wide as possible.
  3. There are three handrails with a low rail for those who prefer it.
  4. There is an inclined lift, which saves space.

I think we’ll see more step-free installations of this style.

Safety

I won’t comment on safety, as I don’t want to bring bad luck to the installations.

Conclusion

All those designing staircases and lift systems for stations, should be made to visit Dalston Junction and Greenford stations in the Peak.

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment