The Anonymous Widower

Is The City Of London Moving Towards One Giant Station?

Bank and Monument Stations

When I was growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, there used to be an anomaly shown on Harry Beck’s iconic London  Tube Map, that stood out as a bit different.

It was between Bank and Monument stations and was marked as an Escalator Connection, which connected the Northern Line at Bank to the District and Circle Lines at Monument.

This link was opened in 1933 and has its own section in Wikipedia labeled Monument Link, 1933.

This link has been joined by more tunnels, lifts and escalators over the last eight decades.

  • In 1960, the Waterloo & City Line was connected to the main entrance of Bank station by two moving walkways.
  • In 1991, the Docklands Light Railway was extended to the complex, with escalators to both the Bank and Monument entrances to the station complex.
  • In November 2018, the new Bloomberg or Wallbrook entrance to the station opened, and I wrote about it in The Bank Station Walbrook Entrance Opened Today.

Bank and Monument stations have been developing as a pair of twin stations for eighty years.

The latest phase of the Bank Station Upgrade has added the following to the complex.

  • A new and much large Southbound platform for the Northern Line.
  • A moving walking between the Northern Line at Monument station and the Central Line at Bank station.
  • Escalators between the Central Line and the Bank station end of the new moving walkway.
  • Escalators between the Northern Line and the Docklands Light Railway.

The upgrade will be completed by a new entrance to the station complex on Cannon Street.

This Google Map shows the area of the station.

Note.

  1. The main Bank station entrance the top of the map, by the Bank of England with multiple entrances to the station.
  2. The main Monument entrance in the South-East corner of the map.
  3. The Cannon Street entrance will be in the triangle formed by Abchurch Lane, Cannon Street and King William Street.
  4. The Wallbrook entrance is under the Wallbrook Building.

The station has spread over a wide area, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see more entrances in the future.

Liverpool Street And Moorgate Stations

This Google Map shows Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations.

Note.

  1. The green space is Finsbury Circus Gardens.
  2. Moorgate station is to the West on the A501 or Moorgate.
  3. Liverpool Street station is to the East on the A10 or Bishopsgate.

There is now a tunnel between the two stations, as part of the double-ended Liverpool Street Elizabeth Line station.

The drawing from Crossrail shows a cross-section of the Liverpool Street Elizabeth Line station.

Note.

  1. Moorgate station is on the left.
  2. Liverpool Street station is on the right.
  3. In the middle looking like a giant juicer is the ventilation shaft in Finsbury Circus.
  4. The Crossrail tunnels, which consist of two running tunnels and a pedestrian walkway between them are at the deepest level.
  5. There are escalators and lifts all over the place.

If it’s raining it’s a good way between the two stations.

The Rail Lines At Liverpool Street And Moorgate Stations

These routes serve the two stations.

  • National Rail – Liverpool Street to Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk
  • National Rail – Moorgate to North London and Hertfordshire
  • Central Line – Liverpool Street
  • London Overground – Liverpool Street to North-East London and Hertfordshire
  • City, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan Lines – Liverpool Street and Moorgate
  • Elizabeth Line – Liverpool Street and Moorgate
  • Northern Line – Moorgate

Note.

  1. The Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan Lines have separate stations and platforms in both Liverpool Street and Moorgate.
  2. The Elizabeth Line station at Liverpool Street is a double-ended station with entrances in both the original Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations.
  3. You can walk between Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations using the connecting tunnel of the Elizabeth Line station.
  4. Both Liverpool Street and Moorgate stations are well-served by buses.

These connections mean that if you arrive in either of Liverpool Street or Moorgate and need to leave from the other main station, you can catch a train on the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan Lines for one stop or walk through the Elizabeth Line tunnel or on the surface.

The Triangle Of Lines In The City Of London

The City of London effectively has three main Underground stations, that connect to all the important lines through the City.

  • Bank/Monument station connects to the Central, Circle, District and Northern Lines
  • Liverpool Street station connects to the Circle, Elizabeth, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan and Northern Lines.
  • Moorgate station connects to the Central, Circle, Elizabeth, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan Lines.

All three stations have direct Underground connections.

  • Bank and Liverpool Street via Central Line.
  • Monument and Liverpool Street via Circle Line.
  • Bank and Moorgate via Northern Line.
  • Monument and Moorgate via Circle Line.
  • Liverpool Street and Moorgate via Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan Lines.

Note.

  1. All interconnecting services are frequent.
  2. The Circle at six trains per hour (tph) is the least frequent
  3. The connections at Bank have much improved recently, due to the Bank Station Upgrade.

It is also possible to walk between the three stations.

In Where The City Of London Leads The Rest Will Follow!, I laid out the plans of the City of London to cut vehicles in the City, impose a 15 mph speed limit and improve cycling and walking routes.

If all goes to plan, then this will open up more routes between the three stations.

Conclusion

Bank, Liverpool Street, Monument and Moorgate will evolve into one large interconnected City of London station, that is served by the Central, Circle, Elizabeth, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan and Northern Lines.

The most important thing that must be done is improve the information.

At least though, the vast walls that have been created in the Bank Station Upgrade and the Elizabeth Line stations, will be up to the task of informing passengers, the routes they need to take.

The other important thing, is to provide step-free and wheelchair-friendly routes between, Bank, Liverpool Street, Monument and Moorgate, so that passengers with reduced mobility can safely get on their way.

After the current round of construction and upgrades, I don’t think any of the rail routes between the stations are step-free.

 

 

 

January 27, 2023 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

New Escalators And Moving Walkways Between The Central And Northern Lines At Bank Station – 29th October 2022

This important link in the Bank Station Upgrade opened yesterday.

So this afternoon, I went and took these pictures, as I walked from the Central to the Northern Line interchange plaza at the Monument end of the station.

Note.

There is only a short bank of escalators between the Central Line and the moving walkways.

A good-sized landing for the escalators has been squeezed in at the top of the escalators between the two Central Line platforms.

At the bottom of the escalators, there is a generous space to accommodate the ninety-degree turn to and from the moving walkway.

The moving walkway appears wider than others on the Underground and is very well-lit.

At its Southern end, the moving walkway connects to the spacious interchange plaza, I wrote about in New Escalators At Bank Station Between The Northern Line And The DLR and showed in these pictures.

The interchange rule at the Bank/Monument station complex appears to be make for the interchange plaza and moving walkway and follow the signs.

  • The Central Line is at the Northern end.
  • The Northern Line is on either side.
  • The DLR is underneath the plaza.
  • The District/Circle Lines are at the Southern end.

I was surprised to see, that there were no staff in the interchange plaza.

Or would one of the Lizzie Line signposts be a good idea?

It could also have a clock.

October 29, 2022 Posted by | Design, Transport/Travel | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Elizabeth Line Bond Street Station And South Molton Street

South Molton Street is one of my favourite streets in London.

  • It runs between Bond Street station on Oxford Street in the North and Fenwick’s department store on New Bond Street in the South.
  • Many times, I bought my late wife; C’s Christmas or birthday present on that street, on New Bond Street or in Fenwick.
  • One of her last purchases had been an Armani suit for work on New Bond Street.
  • She also usually bought her shoes in Salvatore Ferragamo at the Southern end of New Bond Street.
  • I would usually travel there by taking the Central Line to Bond Street station or the Victoria or Piccadilly Line to Green Park station.

C and I spent many hours happily shopping in that small area of the West End of London.

  • We used to shop together for clothes, shoes and many other things.
  • One day at a party in her barristers chambers in Cambridge, one of her colleagues expressed surprise that the following day, I was going clothes shopping with her in London.
  • C replied to everyone’s amusement, that I was a transvestite-by-proxy. In other words, I am a man, who likes dressing ladies in appropriate clothes.
  • I am also lucky, that my mother taught me to sew and in the early years of our marriage, I used to borrow my mother-in-law’s sewing machine and make some of C’s clothes.
  • When long coats became fashionable in the 1960s, C had the first of any of her friends. Because I had made it!

So today, I just had to go and see how the new Elizabeth Line Bond Street station fitted in with my favourite shopping street.

I travelled to the new Davies Street entrance of the station.

  • I walked through the tunnels to the original Underground station.
  • I emerged onto Oxford Street.
  • I walked down South Molton Street to Fenwick, with a couple of diversions.
  • I then walked through Medici Courtyard to the Hanover Square entrance to Bond Street station.

Finally, I took the Elizabeth Line back to Moorgate for a bus to my house.

Note.

  1. There are two banks of escalators to the surface at the Davies Street entrance at Bond Street station.
  2. The tunnel between the Davies Street entrance at Bond Street station and the original Underground station has a seat at halfway.
  3. South Molton Street connects to Oxford Street.
  4. South Molton Passage connects the Davies Street entrance at Bond Street station and South Molton Street.
  5. C had her unusual wedding dress made in Haunch of Venison Yard.
  6. The Medici Courtyard sign also says it leads to the Elizabeth Line.
  7. I couldn’t find a coffee shop selling a cappuccino and a gluten-free cake in Medici Courtyard. That is poor!

One of the station staff at Hanover Square indicated, that there may be additional passages to the West of New Bond Street, that will connect to the Davies Street entrance at Bond Street station.

I feel this could make the area even better.

October 24, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel, World | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Moorgate Station To Bond Street Station And Return

This morning, I went between Moorgate Station and the Hanover Square entrance of Bond Street Station on the Elizabeth Line.

I then walked to the Davies Street entrance of Bond Street Station via Medici Court, Bond Street and Brook Street, and returned on the Elizabeth Line.

Note.

  1. The Hanover Square entrance to Bond Street station, is a single bank of escalators and is only a short walk between platforms and street.
  2. Medici Court is a quick covered walk from the station to Bond Street. There is an upmarket coffee-shop.
  3. ~Brook Street can be used as a walking route between Bond and Davies Streets and on to Grosvenor Square.
  4. The Davies Street entrance to Bond Street station, is a double bank of escalators and is a slightly longer walk between platforms and street.
  5. I suspect that South Molton Street will become a walking route between the Davies Street entrance and the Southern section of Bond Street.
  6. Many times in the past fifty years, I’ve bought my late wife presents in South Molton and Bond Streets.

Andy Byford, London’s outgoing Transport Commissioner has called this new station is the jewel in the crown of the West End’s transport provision.

October 24, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Escalators At Bank Station Between The Northern Line And The DLR

This picture shows the triple-barrelled escalator that runs between the Northern Line and the Docklands Light Railway.

Note.

  1. The digital clock was showing the right time.
  2. There are three escalators.
  3. Peering over the barrier, it looked to be that construction has almost  finished.

This visualisation shows the station.


Where was I standing when I took the picture?

The label at the top right says.

New entrance to Bank station on Cannon Street. Lifts and triple escalators to Northern Line and DLR.

The triple escalator leading down from the Cannon Street entrance to the Northern Line level is clearly visible.

  • It looks like passengers can go between the bottom of the escalators and both the Northbound and Southbound platforms of the Northern Line, using the cross-passage shown.
  • I suspect that the triple escalators to and from the DLR in-line with the escalators to the entrance.
  • Lifts would probably serve all three levels.

It is an intricate design, that looks like it minimises conflicting passenger routes, at the Cannon Street or Southern end of the station.

Move towards the North and you can see the moving walkway in a new tunnel parallel to the two Northern Line tracks, which connects to the Central Line.

At its Southern end, there is a spacious plaza.

  • It has two cross passages to the two Northern Line platforms.
  • It is a short walk to the moving walkway to and from the Central Line
  • It appears that on the Southern side, is the triple-escalator leading down to the DLR.

These pictures show this plaza and the connecting tunnels and escalators.

Note.

  1. The entrance to the tunnel with the moving walkway is opposite the escalators to the DLR.
  2. There are two cross-tunnels connecting the two Northern Line platforms and the plaza.
  3. All tunnels are wide.

It looks like pedestrian routes are as follows.

Cannon Street Entrance And Northern Line

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels.

Cannon Street Entrance And Docklands Light Railway

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels and a shorter escalator between the Northern and DLR levels.

Cannon Street Entrance And Central Line

The large three-barrel escalator between the Cannon Street and Northern levels, a walk to the moving walkway and the escalators to the Central Line.

Cannon Street Entrance And Waterloo And City Line

I suspect, this will use the new route to the DLR and then the existing route between the DLR and the Waterloo and City Line.

Northern Line And Central Line

The moving walkway and the escalators to the Central Line.

Northern Line And Docklands Light Railway

It looks like there are two-banks of three escalators between the Northern and DLR levels.

Northern Line And Waterloo And City Line

Not sure of this route, but it could be via the DLR.

Central Line And Docklands Light Railway

Via the moving walkway and escalators at both ends.

Central Line And Waterloo And City Line

As now?

Docklands Light Railway And Waterloo And City Line

As now?

Conclusion

It would be an ideal location for a chase thriller!

I can’t wait until it opens.

But I do believe that the moving walkway should be extended under the roads to Moorgate station.

 

October 5, 2022 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Up From The Depths At Moorgate Station

Moorgate station must have been built for rabbits, as it is a bit of a warren.

On arriving on the Northern Line platforms at the station a few days ago, I took the rat-up-the-drainpipe route to the surface.

This is the route I took.

  • Up the escalator to the Northern City Line platforms.
  • Straight up the Northern City Line escalators to the surface.
  • Through the barrier and then up to street level on one of two flights of steps, which are on opposite sides of Moorgate.

It is quicker and has less steps.

Crossrail

How will axxess change, when Crossrail opens.

Look at this image, I’ve clipped from this large visualisation of the massive Liverpool Street-Moorgate Crossrail Station.

The image shows the Northern City Line coming into Moorgate station.

Colours are as follows.

  • Blue – Northern City Line
  • Yellow – Circle and Hammersmith & City Lines
  • Black – Northern
  • Turquoise – Crossrail

Details to note.

Existing Northern City Escalators

The escalator shaft to the existing ticket hall is shown in white by the letter M of Moorgate.

Existing Northern Line Escalators

The double tunnels from the stairs leading to the platforms to the escalators are shown in white underneath the Northern City Line.

The escalators to the existing ticket hall are clearly shown. Both are in white.

Circle And Hammersmith & City Lines

When Crossrail opens, passengers would seem to still do, as they do now to interchange between Northern/Northern City and the Sub-Surface Lines.

But there is also a turquoise tunnel with a right-angle bend in the middle, that appears to do the following.

  • Link to the Northern and Northern City Lines at its Northern end.
  • Run under the sub-surface Lines.

Finally the tunnel connects to the big turquoise block, which I take to be the new Crossrail ticket hall.

There appear to be lifts on both sides of the Sub-Surface Lines.

Note.

  1. The lift on the North side of the Sub-Surface Lines, appears to be in a room with a window. Perhaps, the wall will be removed?
  2. The lift on the South side of the Sub-Surface Lines, appears to be in a lobby, set back from the tracks, but accessible from all three platforms on that side.
  3. I suspect they connect to the connecting tunnel below the platforms.

There does appear to be quite a bit of work to do.

The New Crossrail Station

The big turquoise block is the new Crossrail station and Ticket Hall.

Crossrail would appear to connect to the Northern and Northern City Lines, using the new subway, but it doesn’t seem that obvious how passengers will walk between the Sub-Surface Lines and the Crossrail Ticket Hall.

It

February 18, 2021 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 9 Comments

Is This A Simple And Affordable Solution To Providing Step-Free Access At Essex Road Station?

The access to and from the platforms at Essex Road station, is not the best.

There is a set of tunnels beneath the two platforms.

  • The tunnels are connected to the surface, by a pair of large lifts and an emergency spiral staircase.
  • The tunnels are connected to the platforms by two wide sets of stairs.
  • One set of stairs is for passengers leaving the station and the others are for those arriving.

This set of pictures shows some of stations underground features.

It looks to be a difficult station to make step-free.

  • The platforms are narrow.
  • There is very little space in the station building to add more lifts direct to the platform.
  • I’m not sure,but the rail tunnels might be under the Canonbury Road, which runs outside the station.

Unless its possible to use the Greenford solution.

This picture shows the inclined lift/stairs and escalator installation at Greenford station.

Note.

  1. The inclined lift has a capacity of about 4-6 people in normal times.
  2. The staircase is double, with a handrail up the middle.
  3. The escalator is permanently set to up.

It should be noted that Greenford station has two Central Line platforms and one National Rail platforms.

Could this type of installation be used at Essex Road station?

I will look at a few points and issues.

Station Usage

It should be said, that despite the different natures of the station, we are not comparing apples with oranges, as to get between the street and platforms at both stations, passengers have to use the stairs at Essex Road station or the multi-mode installation at Greenford station.

Entries and exits to Essex Road station over the last four years are as follows.

  • 2016-17 – 811,000
  • 2017-18 – 861,000
  • 2018-19 – 857,000
  • 2019-20 – 768,000

The average is 824,000

National Rail entries and exits to Greenford station over the last four years are as follows.

  • 2016-17 – 230,000
  • 2017-18 – 151,000
  • 2018-19 – 153,000
  • 2019-20 – 170,000

The average is 176,000

Central Line entries and exits to Greenford station over the last four years are as follows.

  • 2015 – 4,720,000
  • 2016 – 4,810,000
  • 2017 – 4,680,000
  • 2018 – 4,250,000

The average is 4,615,000

The total for Greenford station is 4,791,000 or nearly six times as much as Essex Road station.

In fact, the difference is bigger than that as Essex Road station could have a pair of installations, so the capacity of each of the Essex Road installations, would only need to be a twelfth of that of the Greenford installation.

The Simplest Installation

The simplest installation would surely be to fit an inclined lift at the side of one of the existing staircases.

The staircase would probably be halved in width, but quite frankly they are not safe for anybody encumbered with a pushchair or a heavy suitcase.

There would also need to improvements to the routes between the main lifts and the inclined lift.

London’s Single Escalators

London has several single escalators.

Three pictures are from Moorgate and the other one is at Greenford.

Could Pairs Of An Inclined Lift And An Escalator Be Fitted In At Essex Road Station?

It would be tight to fit a pair in one staircase, but I’m sure it would be possible. Especially, if the shaft could be widened a bit.

If they could be made to fit, then a simple program of works could be applied.

  • Close one staircase and use the other staircase for both entry and exit. As there is a cross-tunnel, passengers would be able to walk between the lifts and the platforms, by walking about an extra thirty metres or so.
  • The closed tunnel would then be gutted and an inclined lift and escalator would be fitted and tested.
  • Once complete and tested, it would be opened to passengers.
  • The station would now be entrance-only or exit-only, whilst the second lift and escalator were fitted and tested.

Being entrance-only or exit-only would not be the greatest problem, as the 271 bus parallels the rail route between Highbury & Islington and Moorgate stations.

Could An Inclined Lift And A Pair Of Escalators Be Fitted?

In this installation, one shaft would be fitted with a pair of escalators and the other with an inclined lift.

A similar program of works to that I laid out previously would be applied.

Conclusion

Essex Road station could be made step-free.

Because of the bus routes in the area and the 271 in particular, it wouldn’t cause the greatest of inconveniences to close the station for some time.

December 4, 2020 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | 3 Comments

The Bakerloo Line Connection At Paddington Station

I use the Bakerloo Line to get to and from Paddington station for various reasons, and find myself in the narrow two-way passage  between the Underground station entrance in the middle of the Paddington station and the top of the escalators to the Bakerloo Line.

These pictures show the route towards the Bakerloo Line.

 

It strikes me that a certain amount of reorganisation is needed.

  • In the narrow two-way passage signs tell people to keep left.
  • On the escalators, the escalators are run on a keep right basis.

So everybody has to cross over in the area at the top of the escalators.

I’m sure, it could be better organised.

It should be noted that another pedestrian tunnel is being built to connect the Bakerloo Line to Crossrail.

I wrote about the Paddington Bakerloo Line Link in Paddington Is Operational Again!

August 18, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , | 1 Comment

The Steps At Dalston Junction Station

Dalston Junction is a four-platform station and these are the only stairs at the station.

I think the design is excellent.

  • They serve all four platforms, so you can’t go the wrong way!
  • They are very wide, so have a high capacity.
  • There are effectively four handrails for those like me, who want or need to hold on.
  • Fit travellers who can lift their case, can use the stairs.
  • There is a landing half-way up.
  • The stairs are well-lit.
  • in 2017-2018, the stairs handled nearly six million passengers.
  • The small number of interchange passengers don’t need to use the stairs and walk between platforms on the level.
  • The steps are Transport for London’s typical low-slip design.
  • At the bottom of the staircase, there is a wide landing area with two train information displays and a 20-30 metre walks to the four platforms.
  • At the top of the staircase there is a wide lobby, with the wide gate-line in front of passengers coming up the stairs.
  • There is usually, a member of the station staff watching the passenger flows and answering any questions.

But above all there is a single lift about ten-twenty metres from the stairs, so avoiding the stairs is easy and obvious.

I have seen few stairs in stations as well-designed as these.

A few more general observations.

Wide Stairs With A Double Rail In the Middle

This design of stairs is being increasingly seen in London and around Europe.

In Stairs And A Lift At Cannon Street Station, I show a similar installation.

But there are loads like this monstrosity at Bethnal Green station in Before Overground – Stairs Not Fit For Purpose.

How many stations could be improved by widening the staircase?

Probably quite a few, but many staircases are constrained within solid walls.

Handrails

Transport for London generally use round and easy-to-grip handrails.

These are the best I’ve seen, which are on the Amsterdam Metro.

Some on British Rail-era stations are big and square and must be difficult for those with small or frail hands.

An Obvious Lift

At Dalston Junction, the lift is obvious as you approach the stairs.

But in some stations, the lifts are at the other end of the platform.

The Greenford Solution

These pictures show the solution at Greenford station.

Note.

  1. There is an up-escalator.
  2. A staircase,which is as wide as possible.
  3. There are three handrails with a low rail for those who prefer it.
  4. There is an inclined lift, which saves space.

I think we’ll see more step-free installations of this style.

Safety

I won’t comment on safety, as I don’t want to bring bad luck to the installations.

Conclusion

All those designing staircases and lift systems for stations, should be made to visit Dalston Junction and Greenford stations in the Peak.

April 7, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Good Design On The Amsterdam Metro

Sometimes, it’s good design that catches my eye as I roam around.

These pictures are from the Amsterdam Metro.

Most of the escalators I saw in The Netherlands had traffic lights and I like that. Stations in the UK don’t seem to have a policy about which side is up or down. Some shops also deliberately make their escalatoprs complicated, so you take a detour round the shop.

I would like to see a law, that all escalators (and ticket gates) had much better lights to show their direction of operation.

The wooden handrail must be the only one I’ve seen in a new station or building. Transport for London repairs old ones, but doesn’t seem to install new ones.

March 26, 2019 Posted by | Transport/Travel | , , , , | Leave a comment