The Anonymous Widower

Network Rail To Outline Business Case For Clapham Junction Redevelopment

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Rail Technology Magazine.

This is the first two paragraphs.

Network Rail have timetabled their plans to publish a strategy outline business case (SOBC) for the redevelopment of Clapham Junction station.

The public body told delegates at a rail conference in London that it intends to lay out the strategy by the end of the year.

To get a better idea of Clapham Junction station, this Google Map shows the station.

And this map from carto.metro.free.fr shows the track layout.

Note.

  1. The track layout is extremely complicated.
  2. A large amount of the area of the station is used for stabling of trains.
  3. The large number of platforms connected by a pedestrian bridge in the middle.
  4. There are a lot of stairs and lifts between the bridge and the platforms.

This description of the amount of traffic through the station is from Wikipedia.

Routes from London’s south and south-west termini, Victoria and Waterloo, funnel through the station, making it the busiest in Europe by number of trains using it: between 100 and 180 per hour except for the five hours after midnight. The station is also the busiest UK station for interchanges between services.

All of this adds up to a challenging problem, that if it can be solved, will fulfil these objectives.

  • Greatly improve the passenger experience.
  • Increase the train and passenger capacity of the station.
  • Create more and longer platforms.
  • Create or release lots of space for housing and other developments.
  • Make the station ready for the Northern Line Extension from Battersea and Crossrail 2.

All of the development must be carried out with as little disruption to trains and passengers.

I’m no architect, but neither are Network Rail or were their predecessor British Rail, but they are good at creating well-thought out track layouts.

I suspect somewhere in a drawer or on a computer, is a British Rail plan for how the station could be laid out.

Such a plan probably existed for London Bridge station and with the design from good architects and structural engineers on top, one of the best terminal stations in the World has been built.

The Rail Technology Magazine article talks of decking over the whole station and putting two million square feet of development on top. But it also cautions, it would be very expensive.

  • Could an imaginative architect create a unique development?
  • Clapham Junction station, is the best-connected railway station in the South of London.
  • Could the development be built with very little provision for car parking?
  • Is the land strong enough for a cluster of high tower blocks?
  • Could green space be provided?

I’ve lived in the Barbican with a young family and that estate works. But it should be remembered that the City of London had a completely cleared site at the Barbican, due to Nazi bombing.

So would decking over the station, be the way to create a cleared site to create a high-quality eco-friendly development for all?

I think it would and I think it could allow the development to be built at an affordable price.

I also feel that the important objective of building the development without disrupting trains and passengers can be met, by arranging construction in the right order.

Conclusion

Clapham Junction station is a unique site on which to build and like the Barbican, if we build it right, it will be admired fifty years later.

 

July 15, 2019 - Posted by | Transport | , , ,

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