The Anonymous Widower

Tottenham Hale Station – 9th September 2019

These pictures show the progress on the Underground part of the station.

It will be a big glazed structure.

There was talk of the station being completed this year, but I’d rate it for Sprint 2020.

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Landscaping Outside Highbury & Islington Station Is Nearing Completion

I took these pictures  outside Highbury & Islington station, this afternoon.

It does appear that this long project is nearing completion.

At least there’s now a large space in front of the station, that leads up towards Upper Street.

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Platform 2 At Tottenham Hale Station Was Ready, But The Signs Weren’t

Trains were passing through Platform 2 at Tottenham Hale station today, which obviously was ready and had been signed off by all the relevant authorities.

But look at this picture of the station sign on the platform.

Had someone forgotten to order the signs?

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , | Leave a comment

Could A Fourth Track Be Squeezed In At Tottenham Hale Station?

Eventually, when Crossrail 2 is built, there will be four tracks through Tottenham Hale station. It has been anticipated by Network Rail as they have numbered the platforms at the station 2, 3 and 4.

These pictures were taken from the island platform 2/3.

It does appear that another track could be squeezed in, on the other side of the electrification gantries.

Crossrail 2 Four-Tracking

In Crossrail 2 Question Time, I describe a meeting with two Crossrail 2 engineers.

I was told that four tracks on the West Anglia Main Line would be tricky and that the slow Crossrail 2 tracks would be on the East side, with the fast tracks on the West.

In the post, I state that I think, it could be easier to have the Crossrail 2 tracks on the West side, with the Fast tracks on the East.

  • If the Crossrail 2 tracks are on the East side, then, this means that a platform will be needed on the fourth track at Tottenham Hale station.
  • On the other hand, if the fourth track was a fast line, it might be possible to build it without a platform, which would save space.

Each layout has its benefits and disadvantages.

If nothing else, this illustrates some of the engineering problems of Crossrail.

The Ferry Lane Bridge

One of my pictures, shows the Ferry Lane bridge in the distance. This is the bridge in its glory in close-up.

I feel it will need to be replaced before a fourth track is built.

  • Rebuilding the bridge will cause massive disruption to the area.
  • It will have a very large cost.

Does this explain why the STAR project to increase capacity on the West Anglia Main Line was only a three-track solution?

At some point in the next few years, after all the current transport improvements are completed and before the construction of Crossrail 2 is started, this bridge will be replaced.

Hopefully, someone will come up with a way of replacing the bridge, that doesn’t cause too much disruption.

Conclusion

As the Crossrail 2 engineer said, four-tracking of the West Anglia Main Line will be tricky.

 

 

 

 

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Do We Need More Bikes Like This?

When I moved back to London in 2010, bikes like this were rare!

Now, you see various bikes every day delivering bread, children, dogd and parcels in the City and East End of London.

It swhould be noted that in a circle of two to three miles from Bank, London is fairly flat and ideal cycling terrain.

But we still need more!

Have we got enough people, prepared to ride them?

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

The Wrong Kind Of Bleach?

This article on Railnews is entitled 9 September: News In Brief.

It has the following sub-title.

Wrong Bleach Took Caledonian Sleepers Out Of Service

This is the first sentence.

Cleabers who used the wrong specification of bleach in the toilets and shower rooms on Caledonian Sleepers caused significant damage after the chemicals reacted with stainless steel pipes,

To my knowledge stainless steel, especially when it contains increased levels of chromium and some molybdenum, can be very proof to attack from most substances.

Look at this Butler Shba cutlery made in Sheffield from stainless steel with black Delrin plastic handles, which have seen continuous use in my household for fifty years.

Now that’s what I call stainless steel!

Perhaps, the Spanish used the wrong type of stainless steel?

Delrin is a form of polyoxymethylene, which is an engineering plastic.

This plastic has a wide spectrum of usage, including in zips, bagpipes and metered dose inhalers, to name just three of hundreds.

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thoughts On Hounslow Station

These are my thoughts in no particular order.

Step-Free Access

There are only eight railway stations in the London Borough of Hounslow and only Chiswick and Hounslow stations are not step-free and no plans have been published about creating fully-accessible stations.

This is the rather old-fashioned footbridge at Hounslow station.

Current Train Service

The main current Off Peak train service is four trains per hour (tph) using the Hounslow Loop Line, which conveniently pass each other in the station.

There are also two tph between Waterloo and Weybridge, which means the station has a six tph service.

There are also a couple of extra services in the Peak.

Hounslow Track Layout

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows the track layout at Hounslow station.

The crossovers on either side of the station probably allow trains to be turned back at the station.

A train arriving from London, which is to the North East would do the following.

  • Stop in the Southern Platform 2.
  • Wait whilst the driver changes ends.
  • Return to London using the North Eastern crossover to change to the correct track.

It would probably take between three and four minutes.

West London Orbital

Hounslow station has been proposed to be one of the terminals of the new West London Orbital Railway.

It will have four tph from West Hampstead Thameslink via the Dudding Hill Line.

How will these trains be trains be turned?

Use The Existing Track Layout

There appears to be almost fifteen minutes gaps between trains through the station, so would it be possible to use the existing North-East crossover and the Southern Platform 2 to turn the trains?

When you consider, that London Overground generally allow between five and twelve minutes to turn a train, timing could be tight. Especially, if the driver needed to take a toilet break!

And what would happen, if a train failed or there were several passengers of limited mobility to unload from or load on the train?

I feel, that this current method would only be used as a little-used fallback.

A Turnback Siding

This Google Map shows the station and the track to the South West.

Note that there is probably enough space to put a turnback siding to the South West of the station, with some realignment of the tracks.

This method was used at West Croydon station by services on the East London Line, but recently, the service has started to use the bay platform at the station.

  • The train would stop in Platform 2 and unload the passengers.
  • It would move to the turnback.
  • At the appropriate time it would move into Platform 1 and load passengers.

It would then be ready to start the service to West Hamstead Thameslink.

A Bay Platform

This Google Map shows the North-Eastern (London) end of the station.

There is a road called Whitton Road alongside the station, where a London-facing bay platform would be built. The crossover would need to be rebuilt to allow trains from London to cross into the bay platform.

But operationally, it would be easier.

  • Returning trains to West Hampstead Thameslink would not block the Hounslow Loop Line.
  • Passengers using the West London Orbital would only cross the line, if they were continuing their journey from Platform 2..
  • I doubt many passengers arriving in Platform 2 would want to use the West London Orbital.
  • Passengers with reduced mobility changing between the West London Orbital and bus, car or taxi at Hounslow station would have a step-free route between street and train.
  • Drivers would have time for a comfort break.

I will be very surprised if a bay platform is not built to handle the West London Orbital.

A Rebuilt Station

If the West London Orbital is built, which I feel would be highly sensible, the station will probably need to be remodelled to incorporate a bay platform to turn trains.

The footbridge at the station will also need to be replaced with a fully-accessible one.

So Hounslow station will probably need to go through a thorough refurbishing, if not a full rebuild.

September 9, 2019 Posted by | Transport | , , , | 2 Comments