The Anonymous Widower

TfL Confirms Details Of Reading Services

The title of this post is the same as that of this article on Railway Gazette.

This is first paragraph.

Details of the transfer of London Paddington – Reading stopping services from Great Western Railway to TfL Rail from the December 15 timetable change have been confirmed by Transport for London.

Some significant points to note from the article.

  • The service will be run by Class 345 trains.
  • Fast services from Reading and some stations to the East will continue to be run by Great Western Railway.
  • There will be four trains per hour (tph) in the Peak and two tph in the Off Peak.
  • After the New Year Bank Holiday, contactless payments will be available between Paddington and Reading.
  • Children under 11 who are accompanied by an adult, as well as people who are eligible for the Freedom Pass, will be able to travel for free to Reading on the TfL service.
  • Oyster will not be available to the West of West Drayton.
  • Great Western Railway , but not South Western Railway, are expected to bring in contactless ticketing in the New Year.

A few of my thoughts.

What Will Be The Service Pattern?

When the possibility of TfL Rail taking over theservices to Reading, I wrote Will Crossrail Open To Reading in 2019?.

The service pattern to Maidenhead to Reading appears to be.

Reading To Paddington – Limited Stop

This service will be run at two trains per hour (tph) in the Peak with no trains in the Off-Peak.

Stops are Twyford, Maidenhead, Slough, West Drayton and Ealing Broadway.

Reading To Paddington – All Stations

This service will be run at two tph all day.

The service will call at all stations except Hanwell and Acton Main Line.

Maidenhead To Paddington

This service will be run at two tph all day.

The service will call at all stations except Hanwell and Acton Main Line.

A Summary Of Peak/Off Peak Calls

Adding these services up, gives the following numbers for Peak and Off Peak calls in trains per hour (tph)

  • Reading – 4,2
  • Twyford – 4,2
  • Maidenhead – 6,4
  • Taplow – 4.4
  • Burnham 4,4
  • Slough – 6,4
  • Langley – 4,4
  • Iver – 4,4
  • West Drayton – 6,4
  • Hayes & Harlington – 4.4
  • Southall – 4,4
  • Hanwell – None to Reading/Maidenhead
  • West Ealing – 4.4
  • Ealing Broadway – 6,4
  • Acton Main Line – None to Reading/Maidenhead
  • Paddington – 6,4

Note.

  1. 4,2 means 4 tph in the Peak and 2 tph in the Off Peak.
  2. It would appear that all stations except Reading and Twyford have at least four tph all day.
  3. Stations between Hayes & Harlington and Ealing Broadway will get another six tph all day going to Heathrow.
  4. Acton Main Line station will get another four tph all day going to Heathrow.

The frequency of trains would appear to satisfy Transport for London’s Turn-Up-And-Go frequency for Metro services.

No one should wait more than fifteen minutes on a Metro for a train!

Freedom Pass Holders Will Be Winners

Being able to use a Freedom Pass between Paddington and Reading will be very useful for many travellers.

It would appear that the cheapest way to use the trains West of Reading for a Freedom Pass Holder, will be to use the pass to get to Reading on TfL Rail and then buy a tricket from Reading to your ultimate destination.

Note that on the Overground, you can buy a ticket between any two UK stations. So if I was going to Bristol, I’d buy a Return at my local Dalston Junction station and use it from Reading, afdter going there on TfL Rail.

Very covenient and with the best price!

September 28, 2019 - Posted by | Transport | , , , ,

15 Comments »

  1. Where does it say that Freedom Pass holders will be able to use TFL rail to Reading? I checked the Freedom Pass website and it only shows permitted travel as far as West Drayton.

    Comment by mauricegreed | September 28, 2019 | Reply

    • Check the report on the Railway Gazette linked to the post. It’s very clear!

      I think Boris promised that Freedom Passes would go to Heathrow and Reading, when he was Mayor

      Comment by AnonW | September 28, 2019 | Reply

      • The October issue of Modern Railways confirms extension of Freedom Pass to Reading. Of course Reading is way beyond the GLA boundary and this could lead to questions about whether this will become the norm if TFL takes over more services which go outside the GLA boundary.

        While locals who live along this part of the route will have to pay as they only get the national bus pass which is not valid on railways!

        Comment by Melvyn | September 28, 2019

      • I think we’ll see a reform and extension of the Freedom Pass system.

        We might even see a County-based Pass. Berkshire or the Thames Valley, could have their own Pass. Pair it with a credit card and it would be a very useful contactless card, that would encourage rail travel. I look forward to the day, when I can use my Freedom Pass to go to Oxford or Ipswich. I would be automatically be charged for the part of the journey outside my free area.

        Comment by AnonW | September 29, 2019

  2. “Pay as you go with Oyster will not be extended to services beyond West Drayton, due to limitations with the system, which is now more than 15 years old.” Yet they were able to extend Oyster to Gatwick Airport and to Herford North/East stations.

    I live just outside London on the Hertfordshire/London border so do not qualify for a Freedom Pass. I have been able to add my senior railcard onto my Oyster card which give me 1/3rd off Oyster fares. I cannot add the railcard onto a contactless card.

    Oyster/Contactless fares are generally cheaper, sometimes much cheaper, than paper tickets. It looks like railcard holders will not be benefiting any cheaper TFL contactless pricing on the line to Reading.

    Comment by AnonH | September 29, 2019 | Reply

    • As I said a shout of technology will happen. The scenario you outline is one issue that needs to be sorted

      I have just looked Iup Shenfield and Reading and an Adult Single will cost £28.40. Using a railcard will cut nearly a tenner for that! I get it free, but it will soon be able to be done with Oyster or contactless! And how does the daily cap affect all these fares?

      Comment by AnonW | September 29, 2019 | Reply

      • If I read TFLs press release correctly, they are specifically saying the Oyster will not be available to Reading. My suspicion is that they are trying to push contactless and in the very long term eventually ditch Oyster, so will not resolve this.

        Time will tell.

        Comment by AnonH | September 29, 2019

      • Oyster will eventually be ditched by customers as everybody goes more and more contactless. If you are using contactless and you think you have been overcharged you contact the credit card company and they usually know how to respond. If you contacted TfL about being overcharged on Oyster do you think you would be satisfied.

        I think we’ll eventually use a travel app, that will be valid all over the country. Your rail card and bus pass details would be linked to the card, so you’d automatically get the best price of ticket.

        Comment by AnonW | September 29, 2019

      • Oyster will eventually be ditched by customers as everybody goes more and more contactless. If you are using contactless and you think you have been overcharged you contact the credit card company and they usually know how to respond. If you contacted TfL about being overcharged on Oyster do you think you would be satisfied.

        Comment by AnonW | September 30, 2019

    • By the way if you were old enough and lived in Herts, how would a Herts Freedom Pass suit you?

      Comment by AnonW | September 29, 2019 | Reply

      • Most of my trips by Rail are into London so a Herts Freedom Pass would not benefit me much.

        Curiously, Herts bus pass users get 50% discounted fares on Great Northern and Thameslink within Herts and Beds. Not quite a freedom pass but better than nothing!

        Comment by AnonH | September 29, 2019

  3. So my Freedom Pass has become even more valuable. This opens up many more destinations for free with onward bus travel from Reading. The sooner TfL takes over all London commuter services the better for me.

    Comment by JohnC | September 29, 2019 | Reply

    • It would be even better, if the Freedom Pass was developed as a lowest cost train travel brand and web site!

      Comment by AnonW | September 30, 2019 | Reply

  4. According to the timetable TfL have published they are only doing 2 trains per hour off peak from December 2019 to May 2020 for all stations between Reading and West Drayton. There are 4 Trains per hour in the peak. At least in this phase very few trains will terminate or Start at Maidenhead, except for the early morning and one from Paddington in the evening.

    http://content.tfl.gov.uk/tfl-rail-paddington-heathrow-reading-timetable-15-dec-2019-to-16-may-2020.pdf

    Comment by Kevin Roche | September 30, 2019 | Reply

    • Taking a quick look, it looks to me that their objectives are the following.

      1. Have four trains per hour (tph) between Paddington and Heathrow all day.

      2.Have four tph between Paddington and Reading in the Peak.

      3. Fit TfL Rail services into two platforms, as effectively that’s what they’ll have when the tunnel opens.

      That’s why the two tph to Maidenhead have been dropped.

      If it goes well, we could see a few extra services slipped in.

      The new TfL Rail is timed slower than Heathrow Connect by a few minutes, but it probably stops more.

      Comment by AnonW | September 30, 2019 | Reply


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