The Anonymous Widower

Where Are The Magnificent Eighteen?

In the two classic Japanese and American films of the fifties, there were seven saviours, who worked together.

This page on the Highview Power web site talks about their proposed CRYOBattery in Yorkshire, where this is said.

Highview Power’s second commercial renewable energy power station in the UK is a 200MW/2.5GWh facility in Yorkshire. This is the first of 18 sites for UK wide deployment strategically located to benefit from the existing transmission infrastructure.

As the UK’s energy problem is much worse than the problems in the films, perhaps we need more saviours.

In this article on the Telegraph, which is entitled Britain Will Soon Have A Glut Of Cheap Power, And World-Leading Batteries To Store It, Rupert Pearce, who is Highview’s chief executive, is quoted as saying the following.

Highview is well beyond the pilot phase and is developing its first large UK plant in Humberside, today Britain’s top hub for North Sea wind. It will offer 2.5GW for over 12 hours, or 0.5GW for over 60 hours, and so forth, and should be up and running by late 2024.

Further projects will be built at a breakneck speed of two to three a year during the 2020s, with a target of 20 sites able to provide almost 6GW of back-up electricity for four days at a time, or whatever time/power mix is optimal.

Is this Humberside CRYOBattery, the one on the web site described as in Yorkshire? It’s certainly in the old East Riding.

In Highview Power’s Plan To Add Energy Storage To The UK Power Network, I came to the conclusion, that the Humberside CRYOBattery will most likely be built near Creyke Beck substation, which is close to Cottingham.

  • Dogger Bank A, Dogger Bank B and Hornsea 4 offshore wind farms will all be connected to the Creyke Beck substation.
  • These wind farms have a total capacity of 3.4 GW.
  • The Humberside CRYOBattery, now looks to have a maximum output of 2.5 GW.
  • It looks like the Humberside CRYOBattery would be a well-matched backup to the three planned wind farms and perhaps even a few more turbines.

Building the Humberside CRYOBattery at Creyke Beck substation would appear to be a sensible decision.

We Only Have Half A Story

It looks like we’ve only got half a story, with a lot of detail missing.

  • Will there be eighteen or twenty of Highview Power’s CRYOBatteries?
  • Will they have a power output of 400 MW or nearly 6 GW for four hours?
  • Will they have a storage capacity of 2.5 GWh or 30 GWh?
  • Is the web site or the CEO correct?
  • Have Highview Power and National Grid signed a deal for the next few CRYOBatteries?

I am expecting to see a big press statement at some time, perhaps even in the next few days, that will clear everything up.

If it was me, I would invite the new Prime Minister to the opening of the Carrington CRYOBattery and make the statement there.

The joint publicity could be equally valuable to both the Prime Minister and Highview Power.

August 28, 2022 - Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , ,

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