The Anonymous Widower

National Grid Goes Carbon-Free With Hydrogen-Powered Substation Trial

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

These are the main bullet points.

  • Hydrogen powered unit (HPU) quietly provided carbon-free electricity to National Grid’s Deeside Centre for Innovation
  • Only emission is water
  • HPUs could save an estimated 500,000 kg of carbon across all National Grid substation sites

I am an Electrical Engineer and I had never realised that all those electricity substations around the country need a backup electricity generator.

These four paragraphs describe the trial and the generator used.

A GeoPura 250kW hydrogen power unit (HPU) contained within a transportable shipping container measuring 7.2 m by 2.5 m was installed at DCI and produced the energy to power low-voltage equipment needed for National Grid’s innovation testing projects and site operations. The trial tested the capabilities and feasibility of HPUs as direct replacements for backup diesel generators across more than 250 National Grid substation sites, the data will now be analysed and shared later this year.

National Grid currently use diesel generators alongside batteries to provide backup power to a substation for key activities such as cooling fans, pumps, and lighting, enabling it to continue to perform its crucial role in the electricity transmission system.

These backup generators are rarely used and have less than a 1% chance of operating per year, however, on the rare occasion that backup power is required, changing from diesel to low-carbon emission alternatives have the potential to reduce carbon intensity by 90%* and save over 500,000 kg of carbon emissions.

The HPU at Deeside has power capabilities of up to 100 kW in continuous operation mode and up to 250 kW for 45 minutes and uses 100% green hydrogen. The unit is quieter and the hydrogen cannisters used to fuel the generators can be safely stored on site.

I have some thoughts.

Deeside Centre For Innovation

The Deeside Centre for Innovation (DCI), a state-of-the-art testing facility hosting a 400 kV modified substation, designed as a unique environment for development and trial of innovative technologies and practices.

I think there’s something rather cunning about the DCI, as it means that anybody with a good idea will probably approach National Grid for help with the testing.

Visit Deeside Centre for Innovation for more information.

GeoPura

GeoPura has a totally zero-emissions answer to how we’re going to generate, store and distribute the vast amount of energy required to decarbonise our global economies. Or so their web site says!

This page on GeoPura’s web site, gives several case studies of how they work.

They would appear to provide zero-carbon power in widespread locations for Winterwatch, Springwatch etc. for the BBC.

January 13, 2023 Posted by | Energy, Hydrogen | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ofgem OKs Transmission Investments Needed For UK’s 2030 Offshore Wind Target

The title of this post, is the same as that, of this article on offshoreWIND.biz.

This is the sub-heading.

Ofgem has approved the strategic electricity transmission reinforcements required to deliver the UK Government’s 50 GW offshore wind by 2030 target, set out as part of the regulator’s Accelerated Strategic Transmission Investment (ASTI) framework.

A map then shows the principle new transmission reinforcements.

These include two 2 GW subsea HVDC links from Peterhead to England, both of which will be taken forward as joint ventures with National Grid Electricity Transmission (NGET), a 2 GW subsea HVDC link from Spittal in Caithness, connecting to Peterhead, as well as a 1.8 GW subsea HVDC link from Arnish on the Western Isles to the Beauly area near Inverness.

The approval also implies 400 kV onshore reinforcements, between Beauly, Blackhillock, New Deer and Peterhead; between Beauly, Loch Buidhe and Spittal; and between Kintore, Tealing and Westfield; and uprating the existing Beauly to Denny line to enable 400 kV operation on both circuits.

All cables seem to lead to Peterhead.

January 3, 2023 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | 2 Comments

National Grid Avoids Emissions At London Power Tunnels Substation With Green Grid Technology

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

These are the main bullet points.

  • £1bn project to rewire London will see the replacement of ageing high-voltage electricity cables and expand network capacity to meet the increasing electricity demand
  • A new substation at Bengeworth Road in Lambeth is at the heart of the project and will be built by Linxon using Hitachi Energy’s SFfree gas insulated switchgear technology in a UK first
  • The project forms part of National Grid’s ambition to have no SFin electrical assets by 2050
  • National Grid is investing a total of £1.3bn every year in electricity network infrastructure needed to help the UK decarbonise and reach net zero emissions

I’ll now expand some of these points.

The London Power Tunnels

This is said about the London Power Tunnels.

National Grid’s London Power Tunnels (LPT) project is a seven-year, £1 billion project, to rewire South London via deep underground tunnels. This vital work to replace ageing high-voltage cables will expand capacity and help keep Londoners connected to secure and reliable electricity supplies.

Note.

  1. In total, there are 32.5km of 3m diameter tunnels.
  2. They stretch between Wimbledon and Crayford.
  3. As part of the project, a new tunnel access shaft, substation and headhouse is being built at Bengeworth Road, Lambeth to connect to our London Power Tunnels (LPT) route.

The London Power Tunnels have their own web site.

Sulphur Hexafluoride

This is said about Sulphur Hexafluoride.

Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) is used in the electricity industry in substations to prevent short circuits and to keep the network safe and reliable, but it has a high global warming potential. National Grid’s ambition is to reduce its SF6 emissions by 50% by 2030 and remove all SF6 gas from electrical assets by 2050.

Linxon is building Bengeworth Road substation for National Grid and to support the business in its transition to SF6 -free solutions, in a UK first, Hitachi Energy will deliver EconiQ™ 400-kilovolt (kV) gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) and gas-insulated lines (GIL) containing no SF6, to enable the transmission of energy over long distances. Installation is expected to begin in 2023, subject to prior approval of the substation by Lambeth Council.

In the Wikipedia entry for sulphur hexafluoride, this is said.

SF6 is 23,500 times more potent than CO2 as a greenhouse gas but exists in relatively minor concentrations in the atmosphere. Its concentration in Earth’s troposphere reached 10.63 parts per trillion (ppt) in 2021, rising at 0.39 ppt/year.[8] The increase over the prior 40 years was driven in large part by the expanding electric power sector, including fugitive emissions from banks of SF6 gas contained in its medium- and high-voltage switchgear. Uses in magnesium, aluminium, and electronics manufacturing also hastened atmospheric growth.

As I have a lot of experience of HF, my view is that we’re well shot of the SF6, but I’ll be 103, when National Grid eliminate it.

 

 

December 28, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , | Leave a comment

University Of Manchester And National Grid Team Up To Develop SF6-Free Retrofill Solution For Electricity Network

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

This is the introductory paragraph.

National Grid and the University of Manchester are to collaborate on a four-year project to develop a full-scale demonstrator at the Deeside Centre for Innovation, designed to test at scale how the UK can retrofill sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) across its network of high-voltage equipment.

Note.

  1. Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is a gas commonly used in the power industry to provide electrical insulation and arc interruption.
  2. Eighty percent of sulphur hexafluoride is used in the electricity industry.
  3. According to Wikipedia, sulphur hexafluoride has several important applications, including a medical one in eye surgery.
  4. But sulphur hexafluoride is a is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential that is 25,200 times greater than CO2.

It certainly looks to be a good idea to see if the sulphur hexafluoride can be eliminated from electrical equipment and other uses, that may release the gas into the atmosphere.

These paragraphs from the press release outline the project.

The £1.9m project will see experts at Manchester help determine how National Grid can develop a retrofill solution to replace SF6 with an environmentally friendlier alternative without having to replace or otherwise modify the existing equipment.

This solution – to be demonstrated at National Grid’s test facility the Deeside Centre for Innovation – will mean National Grid can avoid the environmental impact and cost of replacing equipment otherwise fit for many more years’ service.

It is not the first time National Grid and the University of Manchester have teamed up on a project exploring SF6 alternatives – a previous initiative which concluded in 2020 is now up for an IET Engineering & Technology magazine innovation award for ‘Best Innovation in Net Zero and Sustainability’.

The press release also says this about the Deeside Centre for Innovation.

National Grid’s Deeside Centre for Innovation in North Wales is the first of its kind in Europe, where electricity network assets can be tested under real life conditions, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

It certainly seems that National Grid and Manchester University are on top of the problem and have the resources to achieve success in the project.

The Russian Attack On Ukraine

You may wonder what this has got to do with improving transformers and switchgear in Manchester and Wales.

Recently, the Russians have been targeting the Ukrainian electricity network. Are Ukrainian transformers and switchgear insulated with sulphur hexafluoride and if they are how of this potent global warming gas has been released into the atmosphere?

November 20, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Health | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

National Grid Invites Local Community To Comment On Proposals For Green Electricity Projects Needed To Boost Home-Grown Energy Supplies And Progress Towards Net Zero

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

These are the four main bullet points.

  • New interconnector with Netherlands and subsea cable between Suffolk and Kent will strengthen electricity supplies and transport low carbon power to homes and businesses.
  • 8-week public consultations will introduce the plans and ask for views of local communities.
  • The proposals include possible co-location of infrastructure (buildings and underground cables.) to reduce the impact on local communities.
  • Projects form part of the electricity network upgrades identified across the UK to help deliver the government’s energy security strategy and net zero targets.

Note.

  1. Eurolink is a subsea electricity cable between Great Britain and the Netherlands.
  2. Sea Link is a subsea electricity cable between Suffolk and Kent.
  3. The consultations will start on October the 24th.

This paragraph from the press release describes Eurolink.

Developed by National Grid Ventures, the Eurolink multi-purpose interconnector (MPI) is designed to harness the increasing volumes of offshore wind power in the North Sea and has the potential to power approximately 1.8 million homes. It will enable the connection of offshore wind farms to both the British and Dutch electricity grids via an interconnector, enabling the transport of clean electricity from where it’s produced to where it’s needed most.

And this paragraph describes Sea Link.

Developed by National Grid Electricity Transmission, Sea Link will add additional capacity to the electricity network in Suffolk and Kent, enabling low carbon and green energy to power local homes and businesses and be transported around the country. The proposals outline a preferred route of 10km of onshore and 140km of undersea cables, together with potential landfall and converter station locations at the proposed Friston substation in Suffolk and in Richborough in Kent.

These two new interconnectors would appear to open up the delivery of green electricity to the South-East of England and the Continent.

As I’ve said before, there doesn’t be any shortage of money to build wind farms and interconnectors between Great Britain, Belgium and The Netherlands.

How Much Wind Capacity Is Lined Up Around The South-East Of England?

Wind farms listed in the area include.

  • Operation – Dudgeon – 402 MW
  • Operation – East Anglia One – 714 MW
  • Operation – Greater Gabbard – 504 MW
  • Operation – Gunfleet Sands – 184 MW
  • Operation -Kentish Flats – 140 MW
  • Operation – London Array – 630 MW
  • Operation – Rampion – 400 MW
  • Operation – Scoby Sands – 60 MW
  • Operation – Sheringham Shoal – 317 MW
  • Operation – Thanet – 300 MW
  • Proposed – East Anglia Three – 1372 MW
  • Proposed – Norfolk Boreas – 1386 MW
  • Exploratory – East Anglia One North – 800 MW
  • Exploratory – East Anglia Two – 900 MW
  • Exploratory – Rampion 2 Extension – 1200 MW
  • Exploratory – Norfolk Vanguard – 1800 MW
  • Exploratory – North Falls – 504 MW
  • Exploratory – Sheringham Shoal and Dudgeon Extensions – 719 MW

Note.

  1. These wind farms total to 12.3 GW.
  2. As the UK needs about 23 GW, these wind farms can power about half the UK.
  3. But no matter, as the East Anglian Array is planned to go to 7.2 GW and only 4.7 GW is so far operational or planned.
  4. So there could be up to another 2.5 GW to come.

This is not bad news for Rishi Sunak’s first days in office.

There’s More To Come

The National Grid press release finishes with these two paragraphs.

Last year, National Grid Ventures also ran a non-statutory consultation on Nautilus, a proposed MPI linking Britain and Belgium, which proposed a connection at Friston. National Grid Ventures is now investigating the potential to move the Nautilus MPI project to the Isle of Grain in Kent.

Much of the UK’s electricity network was built in the 1960s when the country was more reliant on fossil fuels. Today, we need to connect huge volumes of renewable power, such as offshore wind, to the network, to help deliver the government’s energy security strategy and net zero targets and to transition to a cleaner, more affordable, and more independent energy system. New infrastructure, and network upgrades are necessary to get the new clean energy from where it’s generated to where it’s needed.In addition to these proposals in Suffolk and Kent (and the East Anglia GREEN proposals which are currently being consulted on) the need for new network infrastructure has also been identified in North and South Wales, the Scottish Islands and West Coast, the East Coast of Scotland and Aberdeenshire, Lancashire, North-East England, and Yorkshire & Humber.

National Grid have numerous plans to connect up all the renewable energy being developed.

October 26, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

National Grid’s North Sea Link Strengthens Electricity Supply And Repays Its Carbon Cost In Just Six Months

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

These are three bullet points from the press release.

  • World’s longest subsea electricity cable has been in operation since Oct 2021.
  • 5.7 terawatt (TWh) hours of clean power have been shared between GB and Norway, strengthening security of supply for consumers in both countries.
  • It has saved 800,000 tonnes of carbon in the first year, paying off its carbon cost after only six months of operation.

This must surely be considered a good start.

These two paragraphs describe the operation in the first year.

During its first year of operation, the link has imported 4.6 TWh of clean electricity – enough to power 1.5 million British homes for a year.

North Sea Link has also exported 1.1 TWh to Norway, demonstrating the vital role that interconnectors play in strengthening energy security and maximising the benefits of clean energy sources for consumers across the UK and Europe.

In The Monster In The Mountains That Could Save Europe’s Winter, I describe what makes the North Sea Link so important.

It gives the UK access to the Norwegian Bank Of Electricity or Ulla-Førre, which is a complex of five hydroelectric power stations and a massive lake in the Norwegian mountains to the East of Stavanger.

  • The power stations have a total generating capacity of 2.1 GW.
  • Lake Blåsjø is able to hold enough water to generate 7800 GWh of electricity.
  • Ulla-Førre can also supply electricity to Germany, through the 1.4 GW NordLink.

If Ulla-Førre has a problem, it is that if Norwegian weather is dry, the filling of Lake Blåsjø could be difficult, which is where the interconnector comes into its own, as excess UK wind power or the 1,185 MW Hartlepool nuclear power station, can be used to send electricity to Norway for storage.

In An Update To Will We Run Out Of Power This Winter?, I predicted we will add the following capacity to our renewable generation in the next three years.

  • 2023 – 2925 MW
  • 3024 – 3726 MW
  • 2025 – 6476 MW

This is a total of 13,127 MW.

As a Control Engineer, I can see the following happening.

  • Several of the UK’s gas-fired power stations will be mothballed.
  • Some of the UK’s gas-fired power stations will be fitted with advanced control systems so they can supply more precise amounts of electricity.
  • Some UK electricity is stored in Ulla-Førre for onward sale to Germany.
  • Some UK electricity is stored in Ulla-Førre for withdrawal back to the UK, when needed.

One of Ulla-Førre’s main tasks could be to ensure that no UK electricity is wasted.

Conclusion

With all these wind generated electricity and electricity transfers, the Crown Estate, National Grid and the Treasury should be coining it.

The Germans are already building the 1.4 GW NeuConnect between the Isle of Grain and Wilhelmshaven to import more electricity.

But I do believe that another interconnector will be needed.

 

 

 

October 20, 2022 Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

National Grid Installs LineVision Sensors To Expand The Capacity Of Existing Power Lines

The title of this post, is the same as that of this press release from National Grid.

These are four bullet points from the press release.

  • LineVision’s Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) technology trialled for first time in Great Britain following successful deployment on National Grid’s electricity networks in the US.
  • The sensors and data analytics platform will highlight spare capacity on overhead power lines allowing for the integration of more renewable power.
  • Technology has the potential to unlock 0.6GW of additional capacity, enough to power more than 500,000 homes and save £1.4 million in network operating costs per year based on the results from the US networks.
  • Combined with the construction of new infrastructure, the innovative technology forms part of National Grid’s work to upgrade and adapt the electricity network to meet increased demand and help deliver a net zero grid.

In some ways this seems like the sort of story, that could be filed under Too-Good-To-Be-True.

But as a Graduate Control Engineer, I’m willing to give National Grid and LineVision the benefit of the doubt.

  • It appears to be technology proven in the United States.
  • That experience should feed over, once the manuals are translated into the dual English-American form of English.
  • I suspect that applying this technology to interconnectors could increase their capacity.
  • I also think that as we add more storage, power sources or interconnectors to our electricity network, this will open up more savings.
  • As the UK power network gets more complicated, the system should come into its own.

This is an excellent decision by National Grid.

October 20, 2022 Posted by | Computing, Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Should Hospitals Be The Power Backup Locations?

I was reading an article in The Times about how protestors were blocking roads in Central London and they’re inadvertently stopped an ambulance.

So this question occurred to me. Why I don’t know, but my mind has always jumped about and put thoughts together?

Consider.

  • The latest generation of energy storage that could be used to back up the grid are coming down in physical size.
  • Hospitals have complex power systems, as they use a lot of electricity.
  • Hospitals need emergency power backup.
  • Because of their high electrical use, hospitals will have a high capacity connection to the National Grid.
  • Some modern treatments need a lot of electricity.
  • Will ambulances be battery-powered and will need to be charged up, whilst delivering patients?
  • Many bus routes terminate at the local hospital, so if the buses are battery-powered, these could be charged as well.

As an Electrical and Control Engineer, I feel that to put a town, city or are’s back-up battery at the hospital would be a sensible idea.

Hospitals should be designed to be health, energy and transport hubs for their communities.

October 11, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage, Health, Transport/Travel | , , , | Leave a comment

Accelerating The Delivery Of Offshore Wind Farms

It is one of Kwasi Kwarteng’s ambitions to accelerate the delivery of offshore wind farms.

In The Growth Plan 2022, these groups of wind farms are mentioned.

  • Remaining Round 3 Projects
  • Round 4 Projects
  • Extension Projects
  • Scotwind Projects
  • INTOG Projects
  • Floating Wind Commercialisation Projects
  • Celtic Sea Projects

My thinking in this post, will probably apply to all of these groups.

These are my thoughts.

Accelerating Delivery Of A Wind Farm

This will have these positive effects.

  • Electricity will be delivered earlier.
  • Customers will have a more secure supply of electricity.
  • The wind farm owner will start to be paid for their electricity.
  • The Crown Estate will start to be paid for their leases. Although, these might start at signing.
  • National Grid will be paid for the transmission of the electricity.
  • An energy storage company could be paid for storing surplus electricity.
  • Construction teams and engineers can move on to the next project.
  • Expensive construction hardware like ship-mounted cranes will no longer be needed.
  • I also suspect that the government will raise some taxes from the various companies involved.

It looks like it’ll be winners all round.

How Will Delivery Be Accelerated?

These are some thoughts.

Overall Project Time

In How Long Does It Take To Build An Offshore Wind Farm?, I came to these conclusions.

  • It will take six years or less from planning consent to commissioning.
  • It will take two years or less from the start of construction to commissioning.

I suspect that as we have been building offshore wind farms for some years, that it will be very difficult to reduce these times significantly.

But as some wind farms take quite a few years to progress from the initial proposal to planning consent, I suspect that improvements to the planning process may speed up the overall construction time of a wind farm.

Project And Resource Management

Good project and resource management will always help.

Better Design And Construction Methods

I always remember in the early days of North Sea Oil, being told by a very experienced project manager that construction of production platforms was accelerated by the availability of larger and more powerful cranes.

Are we approaching the design of the ultimate wind farm? I doubt it, as in the last few months, I’ve seen two very radical new designs.

In Hexicon Wins UK’s First Ever CfD Auction For Floating Offshore Wind, I show this image of one of their TwinHub turbine installations being towed into place.

The TwinHub home page has a title of The First Floating Offshore Wind Project in The Celtic Sea.

This is the description on the page.

The TwinHub offshore wind demonstration project intends to prove how Hexicon’s innovative design with two turbines on one floating foundation can further reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (also referred to as LCoE) before large scale commercialisation. The TwinHub project is a stepping stone to help kick-start floating wind in the Celtic Sea, an area identified as a hotspot for floating wind by the UK Government. It will pave the path for larger and larger projects to help support The Crown Estates’ ambitious target of 4GW of floating wind in the Celtic Sea.

Scroll the page down and there is a fascinating short video of a pair of wind turbines in operation.

  • It appears that when there is no wind, it automatically goes into a safe parked mode.
  • As the wind rises, one turbine starts up.
  • The second turbine starts up and the float turns so they face the wind.

It appears to be a classic example of disruptive innovation.

I have a feeling that this type of installation might have generation, assembly and cost advantages over a single turbine mounted on a single float.

RCAM Technologies are also creating interesting designs for mounting turbines and energy storage using 3D-printed concrete.

What Ts The UK Government Doing To Accelerate Projects?

This article on offshoreWIND.biz, was published in late September 2022 and is entitled BREAKING: UK Puts Massive Amount Of New Offshore Wind Capacity On Fast Track and this is the first paragraph.

The UK will speed up planning and development consent processes for projects from the recently completed, currently ongoing, and upcoming (floating) offshore wind leasing rounds to bring new energy capacity online faster and facilitate economic growth and job creation.

The article is based on what Kwasi Kwateng said on the 23rd of September about speeding up projects in the 2022 Growth Plan.

A Quick Summary Of Our Wind Energy

The article has this paragraph, which summarises our wind energy.

For the UK, which currently has around 14 GW of offshore wind capacity in operation and 8 GW under construction, the projects from the listed auction rounds could bring well beyond the targeted capacity for 2030, which was recently raised to 50 GW.

I can see the target being raised again to at least 60 GW.

 

September 30, 2022 Posted by | Design, Energy | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Where Are The Magnificent Eighteen?

In the two classic Japanese and American films of the fifties, there were seven saviours, who worked together.

This page on the Highview Power web site talks about their proposed CRYOBattery in Yorkshire, where this is said.

Highview Power’s second commercial renewable energy power station in the UK is a 200MW/2.5GWh facility in Yorkshire. This is the first of 18 sites for UK wide deployment strategically located to benefit from the existing transmission infrastructure.

As the UK’s energy problem is much worse than the problems in the films, perhaps we need more saviours.

In this article on the Telegraph, which is entitled Britain Will Soon Have A Glut Of Cheap Power, And World-Leading Batteries To Store It, Rupert Pearce, who is Highview’s chief executive, is quoted as saying the following.

Highview is well beyond the pilot phase and is developing its first large UK plant in Humberside, today Britain’s top hub for North Sea wind. It will offer 2.5GW for over 12 hours, or 0.5GW for over 60 hours, and so forth, and should be up and running by late 2024.

Further projects will be built at a breakneck speed of two to three a year during the 2020s, with a target of 20 sites able to provide almost 6GW of back-up electricity for four days at a time, or whatever time/power mix is optimal.

Is this Humberside CRYOBattery, the one on the web site described as in Yorkshire? It’s certainly in the old East Riding.

In Highview Power’s Plan To Add Energy Storage To The UK Power Network, I came to the conclusion, that the Humberside CRYOBattery will most likely be built near Creyke Beck substation, which is close to Cottingham.

  • Dogger Bank A, Dogger Bank B and Hornsea 4 offshore wind farms will all be connected to the Creyke Beck substation.
  • These wind farms have a total capacity of 3.4 GW.
  • The Humberside CRYOBattery, now looks to have a maximum output of 2.5 GW.
  • It looks like the Humberside CRYOBattery would be a well-matched backup to the three planned wind farms and perhaps even a few more turbines.

Building the Humberside CRYOBattery at Creyke Beck substation would appear to be a sensible decision.

We Only Have Half A Story

It looks like we’ve only got half a story, with a lot of detail missing.

  • Will there be eighteen or twenty of Highview Power’s CRYOBatteries?
  • Will they have a power output of 400 MW or nearly 6 GW for four hours?
  • Will they have a storage capacity of 2.5 GWh or 30 GWh?
  • Is the web site or the CEO correct?
  • Have Highview Power and National Grid signed a deal for the next few CRYOBatteries?

I am expecting to see a big press statement at some time, perhaps even in the next few days, that will clear everything up.

If it was me, I would invite the new Prime Minister to the opening of the Carrington CRYOBattery and make the statement there.

The joint publicity could be equally valuable to both the Prime Minister and Highview Power.

August 28, 2022 Posted by | Energy, Energy Storage | , , , , , | Leave a comment