The Anonymous Widower

Would A Solar Roof With Added SeaTwirls Work?

This picture shows Oakwood station on the Piccadilly Line.

Note.

  1. The station is the second most Northerly on the line.
  2. It opened in 1933.
  3. It is a classic Charles Holden design.
  4. It is a Grade II* Listed building.
  5. The station is on top of a hill and has an elevation of 71 metres above sea level.

This Google Map shows a close-up of the roof.

There might be a few aerials on the roof, but no solar panels.

Oakwood’s Location And Weather

I used to live near Oakwood station and it had its disadvantages.

  • Cycling home was always up a steep hill.
  • It could get very cold at times.

There even used to be a plaque at the station, which said that if you flew East, the first land you would hit would be the Urals.

Oakwood station could be an ideal renewable power station.

  • The concrete and brick box of the station is probably exceedingly strong.
  • Solar panels could cover the flat roof.
  • SeaTwirls or other vertical turbines could be mounted around the solar panels.
  • There could still be spaces for the aerials.
  • I wonder what the reaction of English Heritage would be.

Should we call this mixed solar and wind power generation, hybrid renewable energy? Or do we overdo, the use of hybrid?

London Underground have other stations of a similar design including Sudbury Town and Acton Town.

The Wider Area To The West Of Oakwood Station

This Google Map shows the area to the West of Oakwood station.

Note.

  1. The striped roofs at the top of the map, with sidings for trains to the North, is Cockfosters Train Depot for the Piccadilly Line..
  2. The large building in the South-West corner is Southgate School, which I watched being built in the early 1960s, from my bedroom window in our house opposite. It is a concrete frame building typical of the period.
  3. Oakwood station is at the East side of the map and indicated by a London Underground roundel.

I think the possibilities for hybrid power generation in this area are good.

Cockfosters Depot

Cockfosters Depot could be an interesting site to develop as a renewable power station.

  • There’s no way the site could be developed for housing, as it’s in the Green Belt.
  • Road access is bad, but access for trains is good.
  • I estimate that the depot is an area of at least five square kilometres.
  • It’s still windy in the depot.

But it could have a solar roof and a few vertical wind turbines over the whole depot as designs and panels improve.

Southgate School

Southgate School could have a similar setup to Oakwood station.

Opportunities At Cockfosters Station

This Google Map shows a 3D image of Cockfosters station and the buildings around it.

Note.

  1. Cockfosters station is indicated by the roundel.
  2. The station is a Grade II Listed building.
  3. The station has an elevation of 97 metres.
  4. Half of the station car park is going to be turned into housing.
  5. Trent Park lies to the North of the station.
  6. The road in front of the station is Cockfosters Road, which to the North joins the M25 at Junction 24.
  7. The building between Cockfosters Road and the railway used to be offices, but it is now being converted into housing.

That high roof of the housing development, must be an ideal candidate for solar panels and vertical wind turbines.

Conclusion

I have tried to show the potential of just one of the small hills that ring London.

 

 

January 11, 2023 - Posted by | Energy | , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] Would A Solar Roof With Added SeaTwirls Work?, I showed this map of […]

    Pingback by Cockfosters Train Depot – 12th January 2023 « The Anonymous Widower | January 12, 2023 | Reply


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