The Anonymous Widower

Connecting The Bakerloo Line Extension At Lewisham To The Hayes Line

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows the lines in the area of Lewisham station.

lewishamlines

Note.

  1. The multi-track line going North-West to South-East is the South Eastern Main Line .
  2. The double-track line going South-West to North-East is the Hayes Line.
  3. The double-track going East are the North Kent & Bexleyheath Lines
  4. I think it is quite likely that the overrun tunnels for the Bakerloo Line Extension will be under the Hayes Line.

The platforms are as follows.

  • Platform 1  is the Up platform on the Hayes Line.
  • Platform 2 is the Down platform on the Hayes Line.
  • Platform 3  is the Up platform on the North Kent & Bexleyheath Lines.
  • Platform 4 is the Down platform on the North Kent & Bexleyheath Lines.

They are numbered from bottom to top in the map.

Services running through the area include.

  • Slow London to Hayes via Platform 1
  • London to Orpington via Platform 1 and the Courthill Loop
  • Slow Hayes to London via Platform 2
  • Orpington to London via the Courthill Loop and Platform 2.
  • Dartford to London via Platform 3
  • Slade Green to London via Platform 3
  • London to Dartford via Platform 4
  • London to Slade Green via Platform 4
  • Fast London to Hayes via the Ladywell Loop
  • Fast Hayes to London via the Ladywell Loop

If the Hayes Line were to be directly connected to the Bakerloo Line Extension, some services would be difficult to run.

But suppose the tunnels were connected to the Hayes Line between Courthill Loop North Junction and Ladywell Junction, the following services would still be possible.

  • London to Orpington via Platform 1 and the Courthill Loop
  • Orpington to London via the Courthill Loop and Platform2.
  • Fast London to Hayes via the Ladywell Loop
  • Fast Hayes to London via the Ladywell Loop

The slow services between London and Hayes would use the Bakerloo Line Extension.

Services On The Hayes Line

Currently, there are two trains per hour (tph) to both Charing Cross and Cannon Street. Some fast services avoid Lewisham, but all services stop at London Bridge.

In the Wikipedia entry for Hayes station, this is said.

In 2004, the Strategic Rail Authority proposed withdrawing services to Charing Cross from the Hayes Line. Following a campaign led by local Councillors and the Hayes Village Association, the plans were withdrawn.

So the locals have form in getting what they want.

Intriguingly, Charing Cross station has two Underground stations; Embankment and Charing Cross, on the Bakerloo Line.

But it will surely lose some of the National Rail services, if Hayes station becomes part of the Underground.

Some must stay, as if all were discontinued, getting to the City could mean a roundabout route and I suspect another campaign would be started by the good burghers of Hayes.

In Thoughts On The Power System For The New Tube for London, I felt that changing to a conventional three-rail electrification could be possible on the deep-level Underground lines.

At Hayes station, it would enable both National Rail and Underground services to both serve the station.

The design of the new Tube for London could well sort out that problem!

Beckenham Junction

This map from carto.metro.free.fr shows Beckenham Junction station and its connection to the Hayes Line at New Beckenham station.

In some ways Beckenham Junction station would make a good terminus for the Bakerloo Line Extension.

  • Platform 1  could be converted to use by the Underground.
  • There is a four tph service between Victoria and Bromley South stations.
  • There is a two-platform station for Tramlink.

But would the flat New Beckenham Junction, where trains join the Hayes Line, have the capacity to handle all the trains and Tubes, going hither and thither?

At the very least use of Beckenham Junction as a terminal for the Bakerloo Line, would need a lot of innovative thinking.

In Could Beckenham Junction To Birkbeck Be Run Using Third-Rail Tram-Trains?, I proposed using tram-trains with a third-rail capability.

This would allow the Birkbeck to Beckenham Junction section of the route to become a conventional railway again and have a higher capacity.

This was my conclusion in the post.

By replacing the trams to Beckenham Junction station with tram-trains, capable of running on both 750 VDC types of electrification and with a limited battery capabilty, would simplify operation at Beckhenham Junction and enable Tramlink services to be extended to Bromley South station.

The collateral benefit, is that Bromley town centre could get a Tramlink connection.

Going East from Beckenham Junction station, the track is only double, but if the New Tubes for London were fast enough, they could gp on to Bromley South station.

 

 

 

 

October 7, 2018 - Posted by | Travel | , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] In Connecting The Bakerloo Line Extension At Lewisham To The Hayes Line, I showed that it would be reasonably easy to connect the overrun tunnels for the Bakerloo Line to the Hayes Line. […]

    Pingback by Connecting The Bakerloo Line Extension At Lewisham To The North Kent And Bexleyheath Line « The Anonymous Widower | October 9, 2018 | Reply


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