The Anonymous Widower

High Speed Rail Group Calls For Cross-Irish Sea Rail Tunnel

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Infrastructure Intelligence.

This is the first paragraph.

The High Speed Rail Group (HSRG) has called for a cross-Irish Sea rail tunnel to be built as part of seven key transport improvements to “strengthen the union between the four nations of the UK”.

The Irish Sea tunnel is only one of the projects proposed.

The full list of improvements is as follows.

  • Glasgow/ Edinburgh – London
  • Birmingham/ Manchester – Glasgow/ Edinburgh
  • Cardiff – Birmingham – Newcastle – Edinburgh
  • Cardiff – Liverpool/Manchester
  • Galashiels/Hawick – Carlisle
  • Manchester Airport – Chester – Bangor – Holyhead
  • Edinburgh/Glasgow and London – Belfast

I think these extensions are logical and in Could High Speed Two Be A One-Nation Project?, I proposed that High Speed Two be extended into a railway that link the whole of Great Britain and Ireland together.

 

January 6, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , | 8 Comments

Lockdown Scepticism Is Part Of The Brexit Divide

The title of this post, is the same as that of an article on the London School of Economics web site.

It is a must-read article about the views of the British on lock-down.

This is a paragraph.

Additionally, there are indications that lockdown scepticism is becoming increasingly entwined with the Leave/Remain divide that dominates most aspects of British politics. Many pro-Brexit Tory MPs are increasingly critical of the high costs of lockdown on individual freedoms and the economy and have been pushing, both publicly and privately, for easing of the restrictions.

If this view is reflected in the general population, will it increase your chance of Brexiteers getting the Covids, simply because they may be more tempted to break the rules?

January 6, 2021 Posted by | Health, World | , , , , | 4 Comments

Northern Line Extension ‘On Track’ For 2021 Opening

The title of this post, is the same as that of this article on Transport Network.

I’m looking forward to using the line in the Autumn.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout of the extension.

 

Note.

  1. The extension starts from the existing Kennington Loop at Kenning station.
  2. There is an intermediate station at Nine Elms.
  3. As with many two-platform stations, there is a cross-over in the approach. It is shown in a picture in the article.

Hopefully, the extension will eventually be extended to Clapham Junction.

Step-Free Interchange At Kennington Station

I have been worried about this and from the comment of others like Melvyn, I am not alone.

This map from cartometro.com, shows the track layout at Kennington station.

Note.

  1. Elephant and Castle station is at the North-East corner of the map and is on the Bank branch of the Northern Line.
  2. The pair of tracks going North-West are the Charing Cross branch of the Northern Line.
  3. The pair of tracks going South-West are the Morden branch of the Northern Line.
  4. Trains going South  to Morden can use either Platform 2 or 4, depending, whether they have come Charing Cross or Bank.
  5. Trains going North  from Morden can use either Platform 1 or 3, depending, whether they are going to Charing Cross or Bank.
  6. The Kennington Loop allows trains from Charing Cross that arrive in Platform 2 to go direct to Platform 1 to return to the North.
  7. There appears to be a revering siding, which can also reverse trains from either Platform 2 or 4 and send them North from Platform 1 or 3.
  8. Chords South of the platforms allow trains to and from Charing Cross to access the tracks to Morder and the reversing siding.
  9. The Battersea Power Station branch, is shown in dotted lines and connects to the Kennington Loop.

I took these pictures at Kennington station today.

Note.

The platforms are in two pairs, which are connected by walk-through passages, with Platforms 2 and 4  for Southbound trains and Platforms 1 and 3 for Northbound trains.

  1. Each platform has a proper clock.
  2. The only access to the pair of platforms is by steep long stairs.
  3. The stairs need to be rebuilt with proper handrails on both sides.
  4. The last picture shows the handrails at Moorgate station.

Currently, the system allows journeys between the North and Morden, either directly or with a walk-across change at Kennington station.

  • Going South to Morden, if you get a train, that reverses at Kennington, you would wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 2 or 4, that is going the whole way.
  • Going North from Morden, if you get a train going to the wrong Northern destination, you would get off at Kennington and wait for a train to turn up on either Platform 1 or 3, that is going to the destination you desire.

What is needed on all platforms, is more comprehensive information displays.

  • Displays on Platforms 2 and 4, would show details of all Southbound trains. whether they terminated at Kennington or went to Morden, or in future went to Battersea Power Station station.
  • Displays on Platforms 1 and 3, would show details of all Northbound trains.

Displays would indicate destination and time as now, but with the addition of platform, where you catch the train.

If there is one problem it is taking a train between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

This public domain drawing from the Internet shows the station, after the Kennington Loop had been built in the 1920s and 1930s.

Note.

  1. We are looking from the North.
  2. The Kennington Loop at the far end of the station.
  3. The four platforms of the station numbered 2, 4, 3 and 1 from left to right.
  4. The stairs between the two pairs of platforms, leading to overbridges.
  5. The lift tower and a spiral staircase leading to and from the surface.

I can now sum up the step-free status of the station.

  • Passengers entering or leaving the station, must walk up or down a staircase like that shown in the first picture.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the same direction, just walk across to the other platform in the pair.
  • Passengers needing to change to another train going in the opposite direction, as they would going between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations, will need to climb one set of stairs and descend another.

It does appear that in an ideal world lifts will need to be added.

Thoughts On Future Step-Free Access At Kennington Station

In the future, it is planned that the Northern Line will be split into two lines.

  • Battersea Power Station and Edgware
  • Morden and High Barnet

Will this increase the number of passengers, who need to do the opposite direction change, as there will just be more trains running on all branches?

Alternative Step-Free Access

But, there may be another way to go between Battersea Power Station and Morden stations.

  • Take a train from Battersea Power Station to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take a train from Waterloo back to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 2 at Kennington to Platform 4.
  • Take the first train from Platform 4 to Morden.

The reverse journey between Morden and Battersea Power Station stations would be.

  • Take a train from Morden to Kennington.
  • Walk across from Platform 3 at Kennington to Platform 1
  • Take a train from Platform 1 to Waterloo.
  • Walk across the platform at Waterloo to the Southbound platform.
  • Take the first train from Waterloo to Battersea Power Station.

Note,

  1. Both routes have two changes; one at Kennington and one at Waterloo,
  2. All changes are step-free.
  3. All changes are very simple

It should also be noted that Battersea Power Station, Nine Elms and Waterloo are all or will be fully step-free stations.

The two routes I have outlined have one big advantage. They already exist and the only costs would be training of staff and indicating the routes to passengers.

January 6, 2021 Posted by | Transport | , , , , , | 2 Comments